#1
'Verily, verily, I say unto you, Except a corn of wheat fall into the ground and die, it abideth alone: but if it die, it bringeth forth much fruit.'

the Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky loved this quote very much, beginning his final novel The Brothers Karamazov with it and inscribing it on his tombstone. I've read it like ten times trying to figure out what it means but can't. so someone - explain your interpretation of it.
#2
Quote by genghisgandhi
'Verily, verily, I say unto you, Except a corn of wheat fall into the ground and die, it abideth alone: but if it die, it bringeth forth much fruit.'

the Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky loved this quote very much, beginning his final novel The Brothers Karamazov with it and inscribing it on his tombstone. I've read it like ten times trying to figure out what it means but can't. so someone - explain your interpretation of it.


I think it means that although a sacrifice in the present may seem meaningless or worthless, it may eventually be incredibly influential/useful later on.
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#3
Quote by genghisgandhi
'Verily, verily, I say unto you, Except a corn of wheat fall into the ground and die, it abideth alone: but if it die, it bringeth forth much fruit.'

the Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky loved this quote very much, beginning his final novel The Brothers Karamazov with it and inscribing it on his tombstone. I've read it like ten times trying to figure out what it means but can't. so someone - explain your interpretation of it.


When a single wheat falls it brings many offspring from its seeds. Could be applied to any failure/death that leads to more, better, and brighter things?

For instance in his case maybe something as simple as ideas for writing that were thrown out, but ended up leading to or becoming something greater.

Either that or it's too deep for me to fathom.


^never saw the sacrifice angle. Makes sense too.
"Nobody likes an unkempt shrubbery - The Monty Python appreciation society"
Last edited by swishy at Jul 5, 2014,
#4
Bro just ****ing accept your place in the universe. It's by accepting your mortality that you are able to produce the most good.

Something like that. I dunno, I'm getting drunk on wheat beer.
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#5
the sacrifice thing makes since, especially reading my bible's more modern translation, but the next verse is kind of bizarre and sends a weird message - 'Those who love their own life will lose it; those who hate their own life in this world will keep it for life eternal.'

this whole thing is too deep for me
#6
It's like a martyr thing I think. The Book of John consists of the days just before Jesus' crucifixion, so I assume it has something to do with his legacy and the need for his sacrifice.

Except a corn of wheat fall into the ground and die, it abideth alone

The corn (Jesus) won't matter (as much) unless it dies.

but if it die, it bringeth forth much fruit

When Jesus dies his legacy will be enhanced exponentially. Seeds could also represent disciples to spread the word.

EDIT:
Quote by genghisgandhi
but the next verse is kind of bizarre and sends a weird message - 'Those who love their own life will lose it; those who hate their own life in this world will keep it for life eternal.'

this whole thing is too deep for me

At least in my youth group, much emphasis is placed on a life dichotomy: the flesh life (what we're all living right now) and spiritual life (that which we nurture during flesh life to prepare us for judgement into heaven). I think the passage refers to the flesh life, meaning if one indulges in worldly luxuries then that person is straying from the spiritual path.
Last edited by Skullivan at Jul 5, 2014,
#7
Quote by genghisgandhi
the sacrifice thing makes since, especially reading my bible's more modern translation, but the next verse is kind of bizarre and sends a weird message - 'Those who love their own life will lose it; those who hate their own life in this world will keep it for life eternal.'

this whole thing is too deep for me


It's one of those paradoxical things. Someone who loves life will see that true virtue lies in making life better for future generations through self-sacrifice. On the other hand, people who hate (or fear) life will try to extend it as long as possible in order to try and "fix it".
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#8
"i'm gonna tell you true things. if a corn of wheat does not die, it waits alone. if it does die, it makes many more of itself."
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#9
It basically means life's not about waiting for the storm to pass, it's about learning to dance in the rain.
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#10
Quote by ErikLensherr
It basically means life's not about waiting for the storm to pass, it's about learning to dance in the rain.

p sure you got that from a Ricky Martin song.
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#11
Quote by snipelfritz
p sure you got that from a Ricky Martin song.

SHE'S INTO SUPERSTITION!
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#12
Context-wise, John 12 is pretty much all about Jesus predicting his own death. He's stating that a corn of wheat yields no increase unless it is cast into the ground, it's an illustration of life through death. He's saying something along the lines of "I'm going to die soon, but my death will be the start of something else."
#13
Quote by SlackerBabbath
Context-wise, John 12 is pretty much all about Jesus predicting his own death. He's stating that a corn of wheat yields no increase unless it is cast into the ground, it's an illustration of life through death. He's saying something along the lines of "I'm going to die soon, but my death will be the start of something else."


In my interpretation, it fits well with Buddhism, Hinduism, and other similar religions.
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#14
Quote by zgr0826
In my interpretation, it fits well with Buddhism, Hinduism, and other similar religions.

See, I understand this perspective. When considering the Gospel, we should do more to ignore that Jesus is in it. Because considering the Gospel with no Jesus is smart and not totally retarded.
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#15
John was a starving roman looking at his fathers dead crops while standing outside during high noon. Dude was delirious.
#16
Quote by Wormholes
John was a starving roman looking at his fathers dead crops while standing outside during high noon. Dude was delirious.


Like the rest of the gospels, the Gospel of John is actualy written anonymously, and mysteriously states that it was written by the "disciple whom Jesus loved", nobody actualy knows who really wrote it. It wasn't even known as the 'Gospel of John' until the second century.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Jul 5, 2014,
#17
Quote by snipelfritz
See, I understand this perspective. When considering the Gospel, we should do more to ignore that Jesus is in it. Because considering the Gospel with no Jesus is smart and not totally retarded.


If you're being sarcastic, try to visualize any religion without others for perspective.
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#18
It's about giving everything to serve God. God can do a lot with the life of someone who is not living for themselves.
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#19
john 4:20

whoever claims to love god yet hates a brother or sister is a liar. for whoever does not love their brother and sister, whom they have seen, cannot love god, whom they have not seen. so pass the joint and no mids my child.
#20
Quote by zgr0826
If you're being sarcastic, try to visualize any religion without others for perspective.

I can kinda see his point though, it's a passage that is pretty much exclusively talking about Jesus himself.
That said though, I think it's plausable that Jesus was influenced by Buddhism.
Buddhism was already 500 years old in the time of Jesus. Jesus is said to have spent his early life in Egypt, and there was a large Buddhist community known as the 'Therapeutae' (Sons of the Elders) that existed in Alexandria at the time.
Professor Rudolf Seydel of the University of Leipzig has noted around fifty similarities between Buddhist and Christian parables and teachings and Professor E. Washburn Hopkins of Yale goes so far as to say, " The life, temptation, miracles, parables, and even the disciples of Jesus have been derived directly from Buddhism."
#21
Read the verses around that and it's clear that Jesus is talking about his death. Just like a seed is no good unless it falls to the ground and multiplies Jesus mission was to die in our place so that through trusting in his death we may be forgiven and have life with God. So to fulfil his mission, he had to die.


Jesus replied, “The hour has come for the Son of Man to be glorified. 24 Very truly I tell you, unless a kernel of wheat falls to the ground and dies, it remains only a single seed. But if it dies, it produces many seeds. 25 Anyone who loves their life will lose it, while anyone who hates their life in this world will keep it for eternal life. 26 Whoever serves me must follow me; and where I am, my servant also will be. My Father will honor the one who serves me.

27 “Now my soul is troubled, and what shall I say? ‘Father, save me from this hour’? No, it was for this very reason I came to this hour. 28 Father, glorify your name!”

Then a voice came from heaven, “I have glorified it, and will glorify it again.” 29 The crowd that was there and heard it said it had thundered; others said an angel had spoken to him.

30 Jesus said, “This voice was for your benefit, not mine. 31 Now is the time for judgment on this world; now the prince of this world will be driven out. 32 And I, when I am lifted up[g] from the earth, will draw all people to myself.” 33 He said this to show the kind of death he was going to die.
---
#22
Quote by Robfreitag
Read the verses around that and it's clear that Jesus is talking about his death. Just like a seed is no good unless it falls to the ground and multiplies Jesus mission was to die in our place so that through trusting in his death we may be forgiven and have life with God. So to fulfil his mission, he had to die.


Jesus replied, “The hour has come for the Son of Man to be glorified. 24 Very truly I tell you, unless a kernel of wheat falls to the ground and dies, it remains only a single seed. But if it dies, it produces many seeds. 25 Anyone who loves their life will lose it, while anyone who hates their life in this world will keep it for eternal life. 26 Whoever serves me must follow me; and where I am, my servant also will be. My Father will honor the one who serves me.

27 “Now my soul is troubled, and what shall I say? ‘Father, save me from this hour’? No, it was for this very reason I came to this hour. 28 Father, glorify your name!”

Then a voice came from heaven, “I have glorified it, and will glorify it again.” 29 The crowd that was there and heard it said it had thundered; others said an angel had spoken to him.

30 Jesus said, “This voice was for your benefit, not mine. 31 Now is the time for judgment on this world; now the prince of this world will be driven out. 32 And I, when I am lifted up[g] from the earth, will draw all people to myself.” 33 He said this to show the kind of death he was going to die.


Precisely.
It's always important to look at the context of a passage before interpreting what it's about.
#23
Quote by Thrashtastic15
john 4:20

whoever claims to love god yet hates a brother or sister is a liar. for whoever does not love their brother and sister, whom they have seen, cannot love god, whom they have not seen. so pass the joint and no mids my child.

how did you guess my favorite psalm
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#24
Quote by genghisgandhi
the sacrifice thing makes since, especially reading my bible's more modern translation, but the next verse is kind of bizarre and sends a weird message - 'Those who love their own life will lose it; those who hate their own life in this world will keep it for life eternal.'

this whole thing is too deep for me


Worth noting they sometimes didn't have conventional superlatives in Koine Greek. Sometimes when the New Testament says "hate" they just mean "love less." I.e. passage where Jesus says in order to love God you must hate your mother and father.

EDIT: changed slightly. Apparently the Greek word "miseo" was less in lieu of superlatives and more just a word that could mean different things based on context.
#DTWD
Last edited by primusfan at Jul 5, 2014,
#25
Quote by genghisgandhi
'Verily, verily, I say unto you, Except a corn of wheat fall into the ground and die, it abideth alone: but if it die, it bringeth forth much fruit.'

the Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky loved this quote very much, beginning his final novel The Brothers Karamazov with it and inscribing it on his tombstone. I've read it like ten times trying to figure out what it means but can't. so someone - explain your interpretation of it.


This is about Jesus Christ as he needs to sacrifice himself for the salvation of mankind.
#26
wtf is wheat corn? Is that what you make corn bread out of? This shit doesn't make any sense fuck the pope