#1
So I've spent the last couple of days or so researching chord progressions and I'm more confused then when I started, but I think I've just came on too something recently...

Basically my old approach was to try random chords from a Key and its parallel minor

for example in the key of A I would use all the chords in the A major scale + all the chords in the A minor scale...I would bounce around from chord to chord until I found something that sounded good

I want to change my approach to something that works right every time and I think I have found that approach now but it might be too basic I'm not sure

So progressions generally go (as far as I'm aware):

Any Tonic
Any Subdominat
Any/Either Dominant or Tonic
Any Tonic

Major chords scale degree:

TONIC: I, iii, vi
SUBDOMINANT: IV, ii
DOMINANT: V, iii, vii

Minor chords scale degree:

TONIC: i, III, VI
SUBDOMINANT: iv, ii
DOMINANT: v, III, VII


This approach has made my chord progressions work every single time without fail, rather then trial and error

Is this approach too simple?

Cheers!
#2
The best way when starting out in my experience is to learn specific regularly used progressions and go from there.

Have a play about with (in a major key)

i-v-vi-iv
i-vi-iv-v
i-v-iv or i-iv-v
ii-v-i or ii-iv-i
i-v-ii

All of these sound good and work in a tonne of songs that have been big hits and/or great songs over the years. Don`t try and reinvent the wheel when it comes to chords. It`s what you do with them that counts.

That being said, chord substitutions are great to play about with and spice up your chord progressions that bit more.

Get the basics down first though.
#3
A simple yet great sounding chord substitution is to take the diminished chord in a key and flatten it and turn it into a major chord. Eg. in the key of G major, the diminished chord is F#. Make it F major, it sounds great.
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#4
Quote by RSGuitarTuition
A simple yet great sounding chord substitution is to take the diminished chord in a key and flatten it and turn it into a major chord. Eg. in the key of G major, the diminished chord is F#. Make it F major, it sounds great.


that is a common trick I like to use but I think of it different

I think of it as borrowing the 7th degree of the parallel minor ... which is the same thing as saying flatten the diminished and turn it into a major

i.e the 7th degree of the C minor scale is B flat major

and flatten the diminished chord and making it a major of the C major scale is also B flat