#1
So I'm wondering whether or not I'm shooting myself in the foot by playing along with tab pro as opposed to the more strict way of using a metronome. I have been playing electric for a little less than a year using strictly tab pro. Previously I played acoustic for several years out of MelBays books (grade 1 & 2).

What I'm really asking:
Is a metronome the only way to get a true sense of timing when playing music, or is a program (tab pro) capable of getting me to the point of having a great sense of timing?

As of now, I'm pretty much incapable of using a metronome. It's not that I can't play the instrument well, I just can't with a metronome.

Do you have any recommendations for short exercises for one having a difficult time with the metronome?

Thanks guys!
#2
i don't think a metronome is absolutely essential- if you're playing alongside anything which is keeping constant time that's going to have a similar effect. i've hardly ever used a metronome, and i think (citation needed ) my timing is not too bad.

that being said, if you can't play alongside a metronome, that might be slightly concerning. As I said, I don't use a metronome but I can play alongside one just fine.

I can't give any tips about metronome use, though (as I said, I don't use one ). Hopefully someone else can help with that.
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#3
You need to be able to stay in time with the drums basically. A metronome just clicks on the beats that the drums would otherwise be playing. A simple exercise is just to start with quarter notes (one note on each metronome click) then eight notes (one on each click and one halfway in between). Try playing a rhythm part with a really simple, straightforward 4/4 feel and think of the metronome as the drums going boom-chick-boom-chick.
#4
Quote by gtc83
You need to be able to stay in time with the drums basically. A metronome just clicks on the beats that the drums would otherwise be playing. A simple exercise is just to start with quarter notes (one note on each metronome click) then eight notes (one on each click and one halfway in between). Try playing a rhythm part with a really simple, straightforward 4/4 feel and think of the metronome as the drums going boom-chick-boom-chick.


Well those types of exercises (whole/half/quarter/eigth/etc) are easy with a metronome, but I'm talking about riffs and runs where there is a combination of triplets, sixteenth notes, quarter notes on the offbeat all in one song/solo is a big problem for me.
#5
Practicing to a metronome is the true test of whether you have a good grasp of time. You don't always have to do it, but you should definitely practice with it sometimes.
#6
Quote by JGM258
Well those types of exercises (whole/half/quarter/eigth/etc) are easy with a metronome, but I'm talking about riffs and runs where there is a combination of triplets, sixteenth notes, quarter notes on the offbeat all in one song/solo is a big problem for me.


Some people like to count those out with the old one-e-and-a two-e-and-a etc, that gives you the subdivisions of the beat. Of course you'd have to start really slow. Otherwise just start with simple 4/4 stuff and gradually move on to the more complex stuff, a little bit at a time.

If you can really get a feel for where the main beats fall within a rhythm part or solo, then all the other stuff in between tends to fall into place - eventually.