#2
Indifferent

EDIT: That is the most pointless link ever. It basically explains that they don't really know ANYTHING AT ALL about this new planet
I hope it doesn't seem, like I'm young, foolish, and green.
Let me in for a minute, you're not my life but I want you in it


O Dayya, te echaré de menos, siempre

Y siempre
Y para siempre
Last edited by BlackLuster at Jul 9, 2014,
#3
They've been finding these for a while, It won't be impressive till we can get over to one.
#6
Isn't this the 50000000th Earth-like planet they've found? We're not gonna get there
dirtbag ballet by the bins down the alley
as i walk through the chalet of the shadow of death
everything that you've come to expect


#7
Quote by NinjaSlayHuman
It looks pretty close to Earth in that picture


NASA is clearly wrong and needs to get their shit together then.
#8
Quote by Trowzaa
Isn't this the 50000000th Earth-like planet they've found? We're not gonna get there
+1

These potentially life-harboring planets are a dime a dozen.
#10
You know, when they say 'may have found an earth-like planet' all that really means is that it's not a gas giant and it's not super close to its star. Chances are they're uninhabitable as fuck.
Check out my band Disturbed
#11
Quote by StewieSwan
You know, when they say 'may have found an earth-like planet' all that really means is that it's not a gas giant and it's not super close to its star. Chances are they're uninhabitable as fuck.

Plus, "only 16 light years away".

When you're measuring distances in light years, the word 'only' takes on a sort of sarcastic tone.
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#12
Quote by slapsymcdougal
Plus, "only 16 light years away".

When you're measuring distances in light years, the word 'only' takes on a sort of sarcastic tone.



But that's less than 4 parsecs! Walking distance.
Check out my band Disturbed
#13
Quote by slapsymcdougal
Plus, "only 16 light years away".

When you're measuring distances in light years, the word 'only' takes on a sort of sarcastic tone.


Think in terms of generational ships, homie.

A Brussard fusion ramjet can theoretically approach highly relativistic speeds, couple that with the technology of approx. 100 years from now, and you have a pretty realistic 20 year journey, plus or minus
My God, it's full of stars!
#14
Quote by Dreadnought
Think in terms of generational ships, homie.

A Brussard fusion ramjet can theoretically approach highly relativistic speeds, couple that with the technology of approx. 100 years from now, and you have a pretty realistic 20 year journey, plus or minus


Yeah, and then another 20 years to wait for images and radio transmissions to come back from there.
dirtbag ballet by the bins down the alley
as i walk through the chalet of the shadow of death
everything that you've come to expect


#16
Quote by Trowzaa
Yeah, and then another 20 years to wait for images and radio transmissions to come back from there.


Yep. That's the beauty of interstellar travel!

However, you're assuming that by the time we attempt either manned exploration or colonization (or generational ship such as in my example) of a planet 16 light years away that we won't also already have settlements either further out in our own solar system or or on other celestial bodies inbetween us and that extrasolar planet.

Hell, maybe the voyage is launched from Alpha Centauri?
My God, it's full of stars!
#17
Quote by Dreadnought
Yep. That's the beauty of interstellar travel!

However, you're assuming that by the time we attempt either manned exploration or colonization (or generational ship such as in my example) of a planet 16 light years away that we won't also already have settlements either further out in our own solar system or or on other celestial bodies inbetween us and that extrasolar planet.

Hell, maybe the voyage is launched from Alpha Centauri?


Fair point actually

But still, it'll take 20 or so years to get news and stuff to every settlement, providing we haven't discovered wormholes are a thing (are they an actual thing?) or something.
dirtbag ballet by the bins down the alley
as i walk through the chalet of the shadow of death
everything that you've come to expect


#18
wurmwholes nyugga

do you warp it?
Most of the important things


in the world have been accomplished


by people who have kept on


trying when there seemed to be no hope at all
#19
Quote by Dreadnought
Yep. That's the beauty of interstellar travel!

However, you're assuming that by the time we attempt either manned exploration or colonization (or generational ship such as in my example) of a planet 16 light years away that we won't also already have settlements either further out in our own solar system or or on other celestial bodies inbetween us and that extrasolar planet.

Hell, maybe the voyage is launched from Alpha Centauri?

As things stand, wouldn;t we need a multigenerational ship to reach there, too?
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#20
Too bad space isn't real
it's all just coming back
it's all coming back

it's all coming back to me
#21
I find all this stuff incredibly interesting, but it always makes me sad, because I'll most likely be dead before any major developments regarding travel to those planets occur.
#22
Quote by slapsymcdougal
As things stand, wouldn;t we need a multigenerational ship to reach there, too?


Assuming we don't improve our propulsion technology, yep
My God, it's full of stars!
#23
Quote by Dreadnought
Assuming we don't improve our propulsion technology, yep

Get me Zephram Cochrane on the line, now!
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#24
Quote by Do Re Mi


It has a less bright sun, and could possibly harbor life.

How does this make you feel?



It irks me. It could possible harbor HUMAN LIFE if it's like Earth. But what do I know? I'm not a scientist that thinks he can know everything about a planet from a pixel on a screen. And too bad I'm not closed minded and think every life form in the universe has to be like humans. Oh wait we already found non-carbon based lifeforms on Earth. I guess those don't exist.
#25
Quote by Wormholes
It irks me. It could possible harbor HUMAN LIFE if it's like Earth. But what do I know? I'm not a scientist that thinks he can know everything about a planet from a pixel on a screen. And too bad I'm not closed minded and think every life form in the universe has to be like humans. Oh wait we already found non-carbon based lifeforms on Earth. I guess those don't exist.


Do you, and people like you, seriously believe that scientists, whose exact job is related to astrobiology, are more close-minded than people like you with the REVOLUTIONARY idea that there could be different forms of life on other planets?
My God, it's full of stars!
#26
Quote by StewieSwan
You know, when they say 'may have found an earth-like planet' all that really means is that it's not a gas giant and it's not super close to its star. Chances are they're uninhabitable as fuck.

you should change your username to DebbieDowner
banned
#27
Quote by Dreadnought
Think in terms of generational ships, homie.

A Brussard fusion ramjet can theoretically approach highly relativistic speeds, couple that with the technology of approx. 100 years from now, and you have a pretty realistic 20 year journey, plus or minus

I dont feel like looking this up

what exactly is a ramjet going to be ramming in space?
#28
Quote by Dirge Humani
I dont feel like looking this up

what exactly is a ramjet going to be ramming in space?


Ideally, interstellar hydrogen. The current setback (amongst some others) to the system is that we apart from the cores of stars, we don't know of an H/H fusion capability.
My God, it's full of stars!
#29
Quote by Dirge Humani
I dont feel like looking this up

what exactly is a ramjet going to be ramming in space?

ur mom hahahaha
banned
#30
Quote by Dreadnought
Do you, and people like you, seriously believe that scientists, whose exact job is related to astrobiology, are more close-minded than people like you with the REVOLUTIONARY idea that there could be different forms of life on other planets?



When they dismiss every single planet that isn't comparable to Earth, Yes.
#31
Quote by Wormholes
When they dismiss every single planet that isn't comparable to Earth, Yes.


This is what I'm saying; you don't know what you're talking about. They don't do that. They dismiss planets where temperatures are too extreme to inhibit certain molecular bonds or reactions, where the atmosphere is nonexistent (although retain the possibility of subterranean or aquatic lifeforms), etc.

I don't think you know enough about the topic to have an informed and reasonable opinion, breh
My God, it's full of stars!
#32
Quote by Wormholes
Oh wait we already found non-carbon based lifeforms on Earth.


excuse me?
i don't know why i feel so dry
#33
Quote by Eastwinn
excuse me?

He's talking about himself.
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#34
Quote by deadsmileyface
you should change your username to DebbieDowner



I'm not being a debbie downer, I'm just not being a sensationalist. In the world of astrophysics, habitability doesn't mean 'take ur vacation here'. Europa, Jupiter's frozen deathtrap of a moon that would kill a human in about half a second, is most likely 'habitable'.


And to the guy saying scientists dismiss life that isn't just like us: No they don't. The general criteria for a planet that can support life is this: Does it have energy? Is there water (that doesn't necessarily mean H2O)? That is why we pay such special attention to Europa and Titan. Neither one of these places would support any life on Earth, but many scientists believe it's extremely possible that life exists on these two moons.
Check out my band Disturbed
#35
Europa and Titan are both really interesting. I'd love to see some good quality surface photos of both moons someday.