#1
Hi everyone !! (this is my first post here !!! )


Asssume that I am improvising,
the rhythm guitarist plays I, IV, V 7

hence building up tension every-time he plays the dominant 7th chord ,
and then relaxation as he plays the I ,
this makes the chord progression sound interesting (At least to me).

Lets say , the lead guitar player "i.e me" decides to bring in emotion...you can say tension...at a certain point in my solo.

How do I use the chord progression to my benefit ? How do the chords help me build up tension in the listeners whenever I want to ??

And i'm not modulating, the scale is the major-ionian.


Please also explain how do the chords decide the "feel" of the solo. Well, I know that the chords that go beneath a solo must be from the same scale as the solo. But what else ???
#2
You don't HAVE to play the same notes as the chords (notes diatonic to a key), you can play the notes outside the key if you like too - there's nothing stopping you.

Otherwise see if you can create a complementary melody line to the song rather than a bunch of exercises strung together.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#3
Well, the chords define the feel of the solo because you listen to them and get inspired by them and come up with a melody that fits the chords. Just listen to your backing track. C-F-G7-C sounds different than Cm-Fm-G7-Cm. But chords are not the only thing that create the "feel" of the song/solo. It has to do with a lot of other things like tempo, rhythm, dynamics, instrumentation, arrangement... The backing track pretty much defines what sounds good and what doesn't. A shred solo wouldn't work on an "emotional" ballad and a slow "emotional" solo wouldn't work in a Slayer song.

When you improvise, I don't think there's such a thing as bringing in "emotion". Improvisation is all about playing what you feel. You need to learn to recognize the pitches you hear in your head and replicate them on guitar. If you can hear clear sounds in your head (not just things like "now I want more emotion"), playing good stuff gets a lot easier. That way you can play what you want and can think purely in sounds.

What do you mean by emotion? It can mean so many things. Sometimes playing faster or picking harder adds "emotion". Sometimes bending adds "emotion".

If you want tension, don't play chord tones. But remember to release the tension (by playing a chord tone). Otherwise it will sound like you have no idea of what you are doing.

Just use your ears. Learn stuff by ear. Analyze your favorite solos. Learn to play them. You need to have a good ear to be able to improvise well.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Jul 10, 2014,
#4
There are no words to describe how chords "Feel". That's subjective and also depends on so may other things - Rhythm. timbre, tempo, etc.

It is not possible to describe what a chord sounds like in a key, but it can be memorized and trained. That's what ear training is. A I - IV - V7 is a very simple progression as well as a great place to start your chord ear training.
#5
The chord tones are your starting point. They are what the listener expects to hear, and the art of making interesting music is all about knowing when to satisfy expectations and when to defy them. That's what non-chord or chromatic tones are for, stepping outside what the listener expects.

An easy way to get a feel for when to use chord tones vs non-chord tones is to just sit down with a chord progression and start playing chord tones on the downbeats. Keep it simple. Then, add non-chord tones on the upbeats. And then switch it around - non-chord tones on downbeats.

As for emotional content, that's hard to quantify. Learn and imitate music you find an emotional connection with. There aren't any steadfast rules, you just have to listen to music and analyze it to work out what other people do in their solos.
#6
Quote by aditya.aditya.1
Hi everyone !! (this is my first post here !!! )


Asssume that I am improvising,
the rhythm guitarist plays I, IV, V 7

hence building up tension every-time he plays the dominant 7th chord ,
and then relaxation as he plays the I ,
this makes the chord progression sound interesting (At least to me).

Lets say , the lead guitar player "i.e me" decides to bring in emotion...you can say tension...at a certain point in my solo.

How do I use the chord progression to my benefit ? How do the chords help me build up tension in the listeners whenever I want to ??

And i'm not modulating, the scale is the major-ionian.


Please also explain how do the chords decide the "feel" of the solo. Well, I know that the chords that go beneath a solo must be from the same scale as the solo. But what else ???



If in diatonic thinking, try the 9 or 11 and 6 of the tonic being played.

If non-diatonic, use tritones, minor seconds, and even chromatic.

Best,

Sean
#7
There are several approaches you could use depending on the result you want. As already mentioned, using chord tones will give you a nice melodic solo which the audience will probably thank you for. Since the progression is diatonic, any note within the whatever key the song is in will be 'fair game' i.e. won't sound bad though you'll have to use your ears a lot more, take care of your phrasing and obviously know the location of all the notes in the key all over the fretboard. Another (and often overlooked) option would be to play off and embellish whatever melody the song has.
#8
Thankyou, all ! I think I get the gist of what you guys say.!!

But if I am using Chord tones in my solo, does it mean that I am "ARPEGGIATING" ??
i.e . using arpeggios???

If that, then how am i gonna resolve the key of my solo ?? If i am to use a different mode every time the chord changes .
#9
To answer your questions:

They will only be arpeggios if you play arpeggios. Otherwise the notes will just be chord tones.
You aren't using modes.
The chord progression will resolve itself no matter what you do or say.
You don't need to change your scale every chord, you can simply play notes from the I chord's scale (ie. Notes diatonic to the key) over everything if you like.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#10
Quote by AlanHB
To answer your questions:

They will only be arpeggios if you play arpeggios. Otherwise the notes will just be chord tones.
You aren't using modes.
The chord progression will resolve itself no matter what you do or say.
You don't need to change your scale every chord, you can simply play notes from the I chord's scale (ie. Notes diatonic to the key) over everything if you like.

Thanks. But what is meant by playing modally ??
#11
Quote by aditya.aditya.1
Hi everyone !! (this is my first post here !!! )


Asssume that I am improvising,
the rhythm guitarist plays I, IV, V 7

hence building up tension every-time he plays the dominant 7th chord ,
and then relaxation as he plays the I ,
this makes the chord progression sound interesting (At least to me).

Lets say , the lead guitar player "i.e me" decides to bring in emotion...you can say tension...at a certain point in my solo.

How do I use the chord progression to my benefit ? How do the chords help me build up tension in the listeners whenever I want to ??

And i'm not modulating, the scale is the major-ionian.


Please also explain how do the chords decide the "feel" of the solo. Well, I know that the chords that go beneath a solo must be from the same scale as the solo. But what else ???

First you need to get locked in to the meter that you're both playing, and tap your foot on the strong beats, which should come naturally.

You're already on the right path by using chord tones and arpeggios. These chord tones should land on the beat.

Adding tension takes practice and ear training, but a good starting point is to use the chord tones as the skeleton of your improvising, then flesh it out with chromatic notes (outside notes / notes not belonging to the scale / outside the key.

Important: Keep it simple. Start with crotchets, or even minims and semi breves. Slowly bring in some quavers. Always being aware of the down / strong beat.
#12
Quote by aditya.aditya.1
Thanks. But what is meant by playing modally ??


There are a number of different definitions but you have to focus on getting your basics down first. The answers will just confuse you.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#13
Quote by aditya.aditya.1
Thanks. But what is meant by playing modally ??

It means you use modes in your playing. But I really wouldn't worry about that, right now. You need to understand more basic harmony and such before you tackle modes.
#14
try some studies of conterpoint: there are a lot "rules" that may help you, for example counterpoint forbids the movement in fifths, the use of parallel octaves, etc. a lot of thing you can learn from it lml just search a book of counterpoint