#1
Hey all,

So in an effort to help people and do promotion for our band, we will soon start filming "self help" videos promoting DIY recording and other band related matters. One of our members is an actual sound engineer so we'll be able to provide good content.

At the moment we're still putting ideas for videos together. Ideally we want subjects that are not already covered on youtube so we can maximise the help and the exposure.


So my questions to you are:

Which areas of recording (or any other music/band subject) are lacking on youtube?

Did you ever look for a guide online but come up empty handed?

Thanks!
#2
Have a look at all of the threads and then choose the most "popular" questions.

Also explain stuff - what mixing is actually about, what mastering is actually about, why over-compressing stuff isn't a good thing...
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#3
i think songwriting is always something that is overlooked in these "tutorials." i would personally be interested in seeing how someone puts their original ideas together even if i had never heard of the band. there are bits and pieces - sometimes on special editions of albums you'll see studio footage where some members of the band are obsessing over a tiny little detail in the song - but those seem rare. i would watch that stuff.

i can see this being difficult to make engaging though, you don't want to focus on a little detail of some song nobody's heard for 20 minutes. record songwriting/recording sessions and then heavily edit them, maybe?
Quote by archerygenious
Jesus Christ since when is the Pit a ****ing courtroom...

Like melodic, black, death, symphonic, and/or avant-garde metal? Want to collaborate? Message me!
Last edited by vIsIbleNoIsE at Jul 11, 2014,
#4
cool, thanks for the advice. Songwriting will definitly be tricky but I'll try to find a way to approach it.

Feel free to post any other ideas!
#5
Gain staging.

For instance... the difference it makes between turning up the gain on the preamp vs boosting the levels in the mix; the difference between hitting a compressor hard with the signal and compressing a lot vs hitting a compressor fairly lightly and compressing a little; etc.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#6
Yeah I'd say there's no real tutorial on gain staging in mastering, another one is MIX BUS compression i've been looking for ages on a decent tutorial on mix bus compression and there all very brief giving limited information.
#7
Quote by vIsIbleNoIsE
i think songwriting is always something that is overlooked in these "tutorials." i would personally be interested in seeing how someone puts their original ideas together even if i had never heard of the band. there are bits and pieces - sometimes on special editions of albums you'll see studio footage where some members of the band are obsessing over a tiny little detail in the song - but those seem rare. i would watch that stuff.

i can see this being difficult to make engaging though, you don't want to focus on a little detail of some song nobody's heard for 20 minutes. record songwriting/recording sessions and then heavily edit them, maybe?

I should make a tutorial/'documentary' style video on how I turn an original idea into a fully-formed demo. It's very easy in Ableton, and I'm not even making electronic music. I think that would be really helpful for people to see. Maybe I'll put something together in the next week or two, whenever the next riff hits me and demands to become a song.
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
Princeton Reverb, Extra Reverb
P-Bass - Mustang Bass
Apogee Duet 2 - Ableton Suite
#8
It would be nice to hear an experienced recording engineer talk about the real life experience of dealing with "newby" musicians who have never been to a real recording studio. What are the things they need to know before getting there? What is the relationship between engineers, producers and musicians? How much should you expect to budget both financially and time wise on a project (some general ideas)? What are the often hidden charges that studios will have for additional CD's or other media? What questions should you ask before booking time at a paticular studio?
Things of this nature for first timers have not experienced working in a pro studio.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Jul 28, 2014,
#9
Quote by Rickholly74
It would be nice to hear an experienced recording engineer talk about the real life experience of dealing with "newby" musicians who have never been to a real recording studio. What are the things they need to know before getting there? What is the relationship between engineers, producers and musicians? How much should you expect to budget both financially and time wise on a project (some general ideas)? What are the often hidden charges that studios will have for additional CD's or other media? What questions should you ask before booking time at a paticular studio?
Things of this nature for first timers have not experienced working in a pro studio.

Honestly, that list of questions is something you email to the producer/engineer before your session. I had a week-long back-and-forth with my mastering engineer on my last EP before sending him the final mixes, so I'd be best prepared.

Showing that kind of willingness to ask questions and be flexible is something that any engineer/producer will appreciate, and start everything out on a very positive note. Also, if you find that they're really dickish to you after emailing them questions like that, cancel your session and tell them it's because their communication is not up to your standards.
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
Princeton Reverb, Extra Reverb
P-Bass - Mustang Bass
Apogee Duet 2 - Ableton Suite
#10
Cool idea flexiblemile, I am planning to do a similar thing at some point and since there is room for both of us on the internet I'll share some good advice.

Humour and cats my friend, those are the keys to success.
#11
I see a lot of mixes in the Crit My Mix thread with waaay too much compression on the mastering stage. Not only that, but the attack and release times are so wrong that it sounds like a mess. At the very least if there was video that could be stickied, it would help with a lot of mixes. I'd make one but I don't really have the time right now with work and the semester about to start up again.

Though I could do a written tutorial with sound clips- any thoughts?
Quote by WCPhils
According to that chart, women like men with a Pringle canister down there.
Michael Kelly Patriot Glory
Ibanez RG8
Blackstar HT 20 w/ Jet City cab
whole bunch o' pedals