#1
I have been playing guitar for 15 years, however the last 8 years i have made absolutely no progression.

I find myself playing the same notes and chords all the time and i lose the motivation when trying to learn new ones. Im a blues player and want to learn so many different styles. I try to play metal, but it still sounds blues just with lots of distortion, this is the same with whatever i attempt to do.

Ive looked for local guitar teachers and after hearing me play they have all said that i am technically better than they are so they are unable to help. I dont know any other guitarists to learn from.

What do i do? Has amyone else had this "players block"?

Thanks
#2
I'm not an expert by any means when it comes to playing guitar, but I think something that seems to work for me, in these types of situations, is learning a song/style that is completely opposite to what you're used to.
#3
Hello KillerQueen,

I've had players block before and I found it to truly excruciating, I have several suggested solutions for this problem.
1) step outside your comfort zone, whether it be learning a song from a band you find using various search engines (google, youtube).
2) learn a song that you believe is far beyond your playing abilities (Yngwie Malmsteen, Steve Vai, The Faceless, and Jason Becker are what I suggest) even if you cant play the song you can still analyze how they play their scales, chords, and arpeggios, and incorporate those into your style.
3) study music theory (if you haven't already). While this is a daunting task its very useful when expanding your style.
4) I'm an expert guitarist in many styles, and I would be happy to give you lessons via webcam, email, or if you happen to be in Portland OR in person.

I hope this helps you,
Lyra Carmer
#4
You need to listen to lots of different music. The reason why you can't play metal is b/c you don't listen to enough if it.

Have you looked in to any theory? That will help solve your limited chord vocabulary.
#5
Quote by TheKillerQueen
I have been playing guitar for 15 years, however the last 8 years i have made absolutely no progression.

I find myself playing the same notes and chords all the time and i lose the motivation when trying to learn new ones. Im a blues player and want to learn so many different styles. I try to play metal, but it still sounds blues just with lots of distortion, this is the same with whatever i attempt to do.

Ive looked for local guitar teachers and after hearing me play they have all said that i am technically better than they are so they are unable to help. I dont know any other guitarists to learn from.

What do i do? Has amyone else had this "players block"?

Thanks


Technical is nothing more than a function of consistent correct practice. I have students that can wipe the floor up with me, and that's okay. I don't set out to practice technique to the degree they do, so I don't expect it either. It's also not as intimately connected to my personal goals. I have competent technique and I can hold my own, and that's all I need. Technique means nothing to me in regards to being a "good guitar player" because its one small facet of the big picture we call "playing the guitar". If you ask them who is the better player, they will all point at me. They understand that technique is a small thing, but it doesn't make them a better player (I might argue that some of my students ARE better players than I am, and I taught them to play! That's not a bad thing at all, in my book!) Thats a testament to their own work and personal investment, and I applaud their accomplishments.

I say that, because if you equate the concept of technique with knowledge I think you've created a larger hole for yourself. As I read this, and forgive me, but you don't understand what you are playing when you play it. You've learned some patterns that have developed into tendencies and habits, and you sound like you have a very narrow skill set of limited use, and seem to be getting less satisfaction from it.

I'd like to learn more about you. I think looking for a local teacher, was a good step, but it doesn't sound like you have teachers that are competent enough to help you, to put it bluntly. I respect that you're willing to invest into your development, because that instantly puts you into the category of people that are more likely to succeed, and I am happy for you about that.

I do offer free mentoring as well, and as I said, I'd like to learn more about you, and if you'd like have a look at the Adademy link in my sig, and also feel free to contact me if you have any questions.

In a nutshell, I think understanding more, and having greater options combined with the technique gains you already have, position you in the best place to not only be a great technical player, but to also understand what you're playing, how and why it works, and open up an infinite number of new doors and ideas.


By the way are you intentionally trying to play in some off time thing, on your SC, or is it a tracking thing, that makes it all sound off time?

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jul 13, 2014,
#6
Personally, I think part of the problem is that you equate "progression" with "learn moar notes". There's only twelve notes in Western music. There's a finite number of scales, modes, what-have-you. There's (probably) a finite number of chords. You're eventually going to hit this wall again and then you'll have wasted a lot of time on something that doesn't ultimately fit your goals.

What do you want to do, and why do you want to do it? If the answer is "learn moar notes", then WHY do you want to learn moar notes? Is it because you think it'll make you "better"? It probably won't. You're going to keep switching styles every time you get bored and eventually you'll be trying to compose in Q#-minor because you're stuck on the merry-go-round of "gotta be different! Gotta learn moar!".

Eventually you're going to come to realize that there's a practical wall that you're going to hit just absorbing knowledge for knowledge's sake, and mastering the Bb9add13 augmented chord* won't actually make you a better player.

I'd say you should decide what it is you really want to get out of playing music and work towards that. Because ultimately, whether you know eight scales or eighty, if you don't enjoy playing them it doesn't matter.

Beyond that, what Sean said.


*I just pulled a random name out of my ass. Don't flip out on me about how it doesn't exist, assuming it doesn't.
Last edited by CarsonStevens at Jul 14, 2014,
#8
One thing that really helped me open up my musical style was alternate tunings. I'm not talking drop d or downtuning really ****ed up Sonic Youth and Pavement tunings. Even if you dont like that style of music try alt-tuning your guitar into oblivion. It lets you explore a whole new instrument with the familiarity of a guitar.