#1
Hi, I'm building an electric guitar with the scale length 648mm (I'd prefer mm to inches). So yeah I used stewmacs fret calculator (http://www.stewmac.com/FretCalculator) and found out that for a tuneomatic bridge this is what it told me : 649.588mm (± 0.5mm) from nut to center of treble-side post. Mount bass-side post 1.5mm - 3mm further from the nut.

That makes sense, but my question is after you have mounted that bridge part, where is the second part(I think its called a tailpiece) go, well does it matter precisely for this part where it goes/ how far away from the actaul bridge part.

Thanks
Ps if you do know the answer can you give me the distance it should be from either the bridge or the nut
#2
I don't think there's a fixed distance for it. I just did a rough check, and the stop bar/tailpieces on my Gibson SG Special and LP are about the same distance apart(1 1/2 fingers width), but the gap on my Epiphone LP is 2 fingers.

It's worth noting, though, that on the Gibsons, the strings are in contact with the TOM bridge, but not on the Epi. Whether that makes a difference to tone or anything, I'm not sure I could say.
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#3
Thanks, I was just wondering, because I know if you place the bridge wrong it screws up the intonation, but I guess the tailpiece wouldn't affect it much.
#4
I have heard, though I can't confirm, that the tailpiece placement can affect sustain.

There's probably someone here that actually knows more, though.
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#5
Quote by slapsymcdougal
I have heard, though I can't confirm, that the tailpiece placement can affect sustain.

There's probably someone here that actually knows more, though.

As I understand it, placing the tailpiece closer to the bridge would mean more downward pressure on the bridge because of the higher break angle. As far as I know - though I stress that all this is just wisdom picked up in fragments from people who know more - that'd mean (slightly!) more sustain and (slightly!) harder bends because the extra friction would make it harder for the string to move in the saddle. I doubt there's any hugely perceivable effect, except when placement is taken to an absolute extreme (i.e. the complaint of poor sustain on Fender Jaguars).

In short, there are some effects of where you put the tailpiece, but I don't think any of them call for precision. The important thing seems to be having it relatively close to the bridge, same reason Gibson headstocks are angled back and Fender headstocks have string retainers/string trees. If you stick it in more or less the normal place I doubt you'll have any serious problems.
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Last edited by K33nbl4d3 at Jul 12, 2014,
#6
The measurement from my LP blueprint is 15.2 CM from the rear (strap pin to mount screw line). But as mentioned it does vary.

I notice you mentioned mounting the bridge first, this is backwards, you should mount the tail piece first to ensure proper string alignment. Then string up both E strings and this will dictate where your bridge goes. If you do it the other way round you can end up with the strings not running straight between the bridge and tail piece.
Last edited by Manton Customs at Jul 12, 2014,
#7
Quote by Manton Customs
The measurement from my blueprint is 15.2 CM from the rear (strap pin to mount screw line). But as mentioned it does vary.

I notice you mentioned mounting the bridge first, this is backwards, you should mount the tail piece first to ensure proper string alignment. Then string up both E strings and this will dictate where your bridge goes. If you do it the other way round you can end up with the strings not running straight between the bridge and tail piece.

I have done around 100 guitars with TOM bridges, and never done it this way, and they pretty much all came out straight.
I personally dont think you need to do the taipiece first, but whatever will work best for you.
#8
Quote by Explorerbuilder
I have done around 100 guitars with TOM bridges, and never done it this way, and they pretty much all came out straight.
I personally dont think you need to do the taipiece first, but whatever will work best for you.


Just a tip I thought would be useful as it makes a lot of sense and ensures everything is correct...almost idiot proof!
#9
Don't forget the hole for the groundwire. The tailpiece is adjusted in height so the strings don't touch the back of the TOM frame as they come off of the back of the saddles. Strings touching the TOM frame behind the saddle effects the tuning and tone of the string.
Adjust the TOM saddles for optimum range. Make sure the string's intonation point is within the saddles adjustment to help locate the post holes.
The critical thing is to make sure the strings are centered on the fretboard. Use the dots or edge of the fretboard to align a loose pair of strings to help center the strings. This locates the tailpiece and bridge centerlines.
Last edited by Guitbuilder at Jul 12, 2014,