#1
My local shop has a 73 sg special (block inlays not trapezoids) and it is priced at 699$. THe reason why it is that price is because it is halfway through a refinish (body is bare wood and some work cosmetically needs to be done to the headstock ) but I am handy with refinishing. The main detractor is that is has a headstock repair at the nut basically. I put it on hold and Im thinking it over. IT plays great and has the original gibson t-tops(valuable on their own) Just coming here to see and thoughts or advice on it
#2
Pic's?
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#3
id haggle with them a bit first, but if you think you can make it the way you want it then go for it.
#4
no pics of it , didnt have the ability to take any in the shop sadly and yeah my plan is to try and bring it down maybe to 550 or something like that just kinda throw cash on the table and see what they do
#5
Is the broken headstock done good? can you feel the fix easy or is it pretty smooth like it should be?

It is very hard to really say without being able to see it. What is acceptable to me at a cetrain price may not be to you.
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#6
I get that its just tought because for me its a great opportunity to get a 70's sg at a time in my life where i couldnt afford a mint one haha. the headstock fix is smootheth but more visible than some ive seen
#7
Well it comes down to do you mind doing some work to it. Do you like it and are you cool with the price?
How are the frets?
how is the action?
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#8
frets and action are really nice , i picked it up and played it , loved it but didnt see the headstock break. put it down thinking itd be out of my price range then they told me 699 and th eheadstock details and ive got GAS
#9
I think im also slightly concerned that that is higher than it should be priced , sigh. im most likely buying it lol
#10
Overpriced. 70s Gibson’s are not worth paying “vintage” markup. And $700 is too much for any SG special that wasn’t played by Pete Townshend. Spend another hundred or two and you can find a recent used SG Standard in good shape. An old SG that needs a refinish and has had a headstock break should be $100 to someone who will part it out on eBay.
#11
ok your going a little overboard with that , the t-tops alone are worth 300$ conservatively 100$ for a guitar is a ridiculous price and a decent 70s sg would easily go close to 2k or at least 1500
Last edited by torontoguywww at Jul 12, 2014,
#12
I have a 72 that I wouldn't trade for the world, same thing as the one you're looking at, with the block inlays. If you're willing to pay or spend the time to refinish it then I say go for it.
#14
Mine has no damage and nearly perfect frets but the humbuckers were replaced in the 80's with some Duncans of about the same value (when I looked up the winder code etc etc they were each about 150ish on ebay). The tuners were replaced with ones that actually work, and the two toggle switches were added which I find useful but lowered the value. I paid 1000 shipped and would have gladly paid more for a guitar that I enjoy this much, even if that price was considered above market value.


#15
Quote by torontoguywww
ok your going a little overboard with that , the t-tops alone are worth 300$ conservatively 100$ for a guitar is a ridiculous price and a decent 70s sg would easily go close to 2k or at least 1500


The qualifier here is decent. The guitar OP is asking about is shit. It has a neck repair and the finish has been destroyed. It’s junk.
#16
Quote by jpnyc
The qualifier here is decent. The guitar OP is asking about is shit. It has a neck repair and the finish has been destroyed. It’s junk.

No, not junk but it is not gonna be worth what the shop really wants for it. You know how many old Gibson's I have seen with broken headstocks and shit finishes? Alot and they are still worth some money. If the repair was fixed and there are no playability issues, how is it a junk guitar?

Besides the real value of a guitar is what someone is willing to pay for it.
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#17
The 70s was one of the worst for Gibson in terms of quality instruments and a thrashed and broken one even more so. You should be able to find a 70s SG in good condition fairly easily for less than $1k.

For reference: I bought my 67 SG Special a while ago for $200. All original in good condition.

Keep looking.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#18
If the guitar plays the way you like it, then what does it matter if the overall quality output of that era is poor?
#19
Quote by Vlasco
If the guitar plays the way you like it, then what does it matter if the overall quality output of that era is poor?


$$$ value only. If that run down beat up axe gets his mojo going he should offer them $300 for it and give it a nice new home. In that condition it has zero vintage guitar value and a refinish results in less value, not more. I suspect a lot of 10 yr old Sgs are better players at the same price but there is something about an old guitar.

I went and checked out a 90s Les Paul DC that was selling for $500 last year. There were some good ones in that era. It was the most banged-up, neck repaired, hack-modded guitar I have ever seen. All the LP vibe had been effectively killed off and I would not have bought it for $20. YMMV
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Jul 13, 2014,
#20
If good playing 70s SGs that get his mojo going aren't common and they won't let it go for 300 then what does standard value count for anyways? To me an extra 300-400 bucks for a guitar I know I like, isn't in current production, and that I will have for decades is beyond insignificant.

Unless of course you're one of those people that just buys guitars by the dozen and constantly recycles them and aren't sure if you'll be keeping it past next week.
#21
Aside from the structural and cosmetic issues, 1973 isn't exactly considered a banner year for Gibson. I would consider what you are looking at more like just an old guitar, certainly not "vintage" in the way pre-CBS Fenders and '50s-early '60s Gibsons are... At $700, it is no bargain. But it could be a fun project that could yield a great playing and sounding old Gibson, and once restored, would easily be worth what you have into it, and will likely appreciate over time.

If you do some rattle can or oil finish it won't raise the value much above whatever you pay for it. The finish would have to be vintage correct, and look professional.
#22
Yeah, probably not a great investment to pay into and most shops won't talk prices down a whole lot. If you're confident in your finishing skills and the headstock is repaired well then it could make a good player with a good personal story related to it.
#23
Quote by Vlasco
If good playing 70s SGs that get his mojo going aren't common and they won't let it go for 300 then what does standard value count for anyways? To me an extra 300-400 bucks for a guitar I know I like, isn't in current production, and that I will have for decades is beyond insignificant.

Unless of course you're one of those people that just buys guitars by the dozen and constantly recycles them and aren't sure if you'll be keeping it past next week.


Naw, I just hate paying too much for an old beater that some seller has attached a false "vintage" description to in order to jack up the price.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#25
I'd say pass on this one.

"Vintage" isn't all it's cracked up to be, and the vintage market is going to be on the decline over the next few years (baby boomers selling off their guitars, and their big money no longer interested in the nostalgia pieces).

There's nothing inherently "mojo" about an older solid body guitar, the '70's weren't good to Gibson and that's certainly true about one that's had a neck repair. There's no musical benefit, no investment benefit.

The only benefit is to the shop that pulled it away from the chipper and said, "You know, *somebody* will buy this..."