#1
I've been playing for over a year i have played electric guitar i have never really played acoustic but recently i have been trying i am having trouble with strumming and fretting barre chords its seems very difficult does anyone have any tips on switching and learning to strum?
#2
Tbh, it's just about getting used to it, and stay consistant at it. You could always get it setup, so it's easier to play, and get some lighter strings.
#5
#1 tip would be don't be a wuss.

Lighter strings and a setup will help, but you'll get used to the feel of the acoustic as you play more. This isn't something that'll be solved by asking a question online, you've really just gotta play more and it'll get easier as you play.
#6
Quote by mattousley
Is 3mm setup good?
you could maybe get 2.7 to 2.8 out of it, after that you might be chasing buzzes up and down the fret board.

A set of electric lights, (.009 to .042), has less than 100 lbs. tension total.

A set of acoustic lights (.012 to .053), has a 165 pounds of tension total.

Which one should be easier to play?

To learn to strum, listen to people strumming, and strum along with them. In other words mimic

An acoustic is a far different animal than an electric. It teaches you that you need to learn how to sing, and not rely on anybody other than yourself to establish the rhythm.

As far as barre chords go, ignore them. All those simple open position "cowboy chords" that you've been ignoring on an electric, and playing "power chords" instead, sound like angels singing on an acoustic. If you want the angels to sing higher, slap on a capo.

Or, buy a 12 string acoustic and practice with that. When you go back to the 6 string, it will seem very easy to play.
#8
If you're just practicing and getting used to it, drop your tuning a step to d standard, you'll find it much easier to fret bar chords while you build up strength.

As for strumming, all you can do is practice
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#9
Barre chords on a acoustic may seem impossible at first but they really aren't that bad. Practice about 5 minutes a day on them by using a full barre and an E major and A minor shape(these are the most common), switching on and off and moving up the fretboard to the 12th fret and back down to the 1st. Do this in your daily routine and you'll be playing them pretty well after a few weeks; just need to get those finger/hand muscles accustomed. Some tips: Make sure your thumb is in the middle of the neck and positioned directly underneath the index(barring) finger, maybe slightly ahead, and pinch it tight just behind the fret. Also tilt your index finger slightly on it's side and experiment with moving it higher and lower until you find the right spot on your finger that holds all the strings cleanly. You'll want the bony parts of your finger hitting the strings not the fleshy parts.

A capo is a useful tool to change the pitch of the guitar but it's no substitute for barre chords. many songs which use a capo still have barre chords. You'll want to learn how to play them sooner or later or you will be really limited on the songs you can play. I've only been playing 7 months and quite honestly I still suck, but I can play barre chords so I'm sure you will be able to as well.

Action: My acoustics are set up @ 2.5 mm on the 6th string and 2.0 on the 1st measured at the 12th fret. I wouldn't want to go any lower than that unless you have a high end guitar with an excellent fret job or else you may get a lot of fret buzz. I get a little bit at those measurements. You'll also want to check the action at the nut. .022" at the 6th string down to .018" at the 1st using a feeler gage.
#10
Quote by rohash
...[ ]....A capo is a useful tool to change the pitch of the guitar but it's no substitute for barre chords. many songs which use a capo still have barre chords. You'll want to learn how to play them sooner or later or you will be really limited on the songs you can play. I've only been playing 7 months and quite honestly I still suck, but I can play barre chords so I'm sure you will be able to as well.......[ ].....
A capo is often used to change the SHAPES of the chords, as often as the pitch. And yes, there will still some barre shapes even with a capo being used. Most notably B minor, playing in the key of G. (Or the most common "shapes" of G if you will, (G, C, D, Em, Am)

Another thing a capo is used for, is to match the pitch of the open strings to the notes in a key.

The guitar as a whole, sucks for playing in keys with flats. Consider the names of the open strings. Every one is a sharp key. So, some good uses for a capo would be the keys of, Ab, F, Bb, Db, & Eb.

With a capo in place in these keys, the open strings are much more likely to be usable as drones.

I know there's a certain machismo attitude with some players, on the order of, "real guitar players don't use capos", but that's bull sh!t, they do.

Besides, if you can play barre chords on your acoustic, then you're probably aware that asking questions on the internet, won't toughen up your fingers, playing will.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 14, 2014,
#11
I practice everything over on my acoustic, when I find something I really like, I plug it in.
#12
Quote by Captaincranky
A capo is often used to change the SHAPES of the chords, as often as the pitch. And yes, there will still some barre shapes even with a capo being used. Most notably B minor, playing in the key of G. (Or the most common "shapes" of G if you will, (G, C, D, Em, Am)

Another thing a capo is used for, is to match the pitch of the open strings to the notes in a key.

The guitar as a whole, sucks for playing in keys with flats. Consider the names of the open strings. Every one is a sharp key. So, some good uses for a capo would be the keys of, Ab, F, Bb, Db, & Eb.

With a capo in place in these keys, the open strings are much more likely to be usable as drones.

I know there's a certain machismo attitude with some players, on the order of, "real guitar players don't use capos", but that's bull sh!t, they do.

Besides, if you can play barre chords on your acoustic, then you're probably aware that asking questions on the internet, won't toughen up your fingers, playing will.


Agreed, a capo is a very useful thing. I have 3 of them, 1 in each guitar case. Still gotta learn those barre chords though.