#1
Hello guys, it's my first time posting on these forums so if I posted this in the wrong section I apologize in advance.

Alright, so basically I found a what seems to be an old classical guitar in the cellar which is in decent condition, aside from the neck. The guitar itself is over 30 years old and is of an unknown brand. I'm guessing that the problem is that it has been fitted with steel strings instead of nylon strings, which haven't been replaced since the guitar has been purchased. As such, the neck has been pulled out of place as a result of tension caused by the steel strings.

There are problems in tone after the 12th fret as well, although considering that the notes after the 12th fret are barely reachable the guitar is still decently playable and honestly I'm surprised that the neck hasn't snapped after being exposed to decades of high tension if that was the problem in the first place. The action is high, although manageable, and I believe that if the neck can be put back into its original position, the guitar will be more than playable.

Overall, I'm wondering whether there is a possibility of repairing such a problem. I'm posting here first before going to a guitar repair shop so that I won't have to go there for no reason. Here are some pictures of the issue I'm talking about:

http://i.imgur.com/SapwRPB.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/mvxchSQ.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/IH7fKux.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/HBxzxZl.jpg
Last edited by Hexaddict at Jul 14, 2014,
#2
It looks to me as if that strange mod was done to fix a high action. Getting it back to something like normal would, I am sure, cost many times more than the guitar is worth - unless it has great sentimental value.

If it were mine I would do rough fix - put a wedge under the fretboard extension and a heel cap to bring the heal to a more normal-looking position. I had a requinto that was stored in my brother-in-law's hot attic for 20 years, and it had a practically fallen apart. I glued it back together again, and got the action down by cutting a wedge out of the back of the heel. I disguised the heel repair with black bog made from epoxy and powder paint:



The point is that it is a rough but effective fix that doesn't look too bad.