#1
So I have played for about 9 years, on acoustic steel string, and electric, bass, and slight violin. None of which have I ever tried to finger pick, which I have 0 experience with. My question is this, Is it going to be harder for me to play with my fingers since I learned with a plectrum? I am 25 now, so I think I am still young enough to learn, but what time frame am I looking at to get as good on classical flamenco, as I am at acoustic steel string or electric?

And are there any specific things I should avoid doing when transitioning?
#2
It's going to be just as hard learning to finger pick now, as it would've if you had tried nine years ago. Honestly, just don't worry about it and go for it.
it's all just coming back
it's all coming back

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#3
itll be great. when you first start guitar you dont really know to not pick up bad habits. Use the learning skills and knowledge you already have to make sure you learn the technique right.
Quote by Rick540
I play in drop F. When I chug on the 6th string the floor splits open and satan crawls out.
#4
Quote by pks330
So I have played for about 9 years, on acoustic steel string, and electric, bass, and slight violin. None of which have I ever tried to finger pick, which I have 0 experience with. My question is this, Is it going to be harder for me to play with my fingers since I learned with a plectrum? I am 25 now, so I think I am still young enough to learn, but what time frame am I looking at to get as good on classical flamenco, as I am at acoustic steel string or electric?

And are there any specific things I should avoid doing when transitioning?


I went from playing electric to Classical guitar a few years in, so I know what you are in for:

1) you are actually better off having no experience fingerpicking. A fresh slate is actually preferable for classical, since it involves a pretty specific technique on the right hand. I went from zero fingerpicking experience to playing some pretty complex pieces in my first year, practicing 2-4 hours a day. Even the simplest classical pieces are 100 times more complex than anything you'll find in rock or metal, from a fingerpicking standpoint.

2) take lessons, preferably with someone from a local university with a guitar program. With a few hours a day of practice, you should be good within a year.

3) the main difference between regular guitar playing and Classical/nylon string, other than the fact that you are fingerpicking nylon strings, is left hand placement - Classical guitar necks don't lend themselves well to wrapping your thumb around the neck ( Hendrix grip).

4) check out Rodriguo Y gabriela if you haven't already, they're awesome!
#5
Can you sight read sheet music? Because fingerpicking won't be the problem, sight reading will. Fortunately for me, I could read sheet music when I started which sped things up a lot.

If you can't already start practicing now. Focus on reading from frets zero to five because you'll start out playing there.
#6
Quote by Duaneclapdrix
Can you sight read sheet music? Because fingerpicking won't be the problem, sight reading will. Fortunately for me, I could read sheet music when I started which sped things up a lot.

If you can't already start practicing now. Focus on reading from frets zero to five because you'll start out playing there.


Sight reading is not a requirement for classical.

Reading sheet music is something you will need to learn, but it's not really that crucial, especially for flamenco. Most pieces are on you tube now anyway, so you can pick up the rhythms by ear if you're not great at reading rhythms, which is the only difficult part of reading music.
#7
Believe me, as someone who "reads" but doesn't sight read very well, being a solid reader is a massive timesaver when you rely on written music. Basically, the faster you can get music from the page to your fingers accurately, the better.

If you want to get the most out of classical music, definitely get a teacher. Classical music in general is highly institutional and traditional, and everything about it has been passed down through generations of teachers and students. Trying to fumble through it without a long-term method will not net you much improvement, because you aren't likely to develop the intense focus and precision necessary to perform the music competently. Classical guitar is almost a separate instrument, and classical music has a distinct approach you don't see in a lot of artists without classical training.

Definitely take the time to decide if you want become a Classical Guitarist, or whether you just want to "Learn some classical music". You don't have to commit to being a virtuoso, but Classical music is a whole lot more than just learning new songs.
Last edited by cdgraves at Jul 15, 2014,
#8
agree with cdgraves, you may learn to play some classical music but for really playing classical you might need a teacher, mostly for technique. Lets say you start having a weird fingerpicking style but just continue developing, that will become a trouble as you advance, a teacher will make grow the right way in technique, however no need to be nervous, classical music its really fun but way more complex and precise than other guitar genres
#9
I strongly agree with the two above posts - get a teacher to start. The basic right hand grip and technique is probably the most important part.