#1
So I have played for about 9 years, on acoustic steel string, and electric, bass, and slight violin. None of which have I ever tried to finger pick, which I have 0 experience with. My question is this, Is it going to be harder for me to play with my fingers since I learned with a plectrum? I am 25 now, so I think I am still young enough to learn, but what time frame am I looking at to get as good on classical flamenco, as I am at acoustic steel string or electric?

And are there any specific things I should avoid doing when transitioning?

I posted this in Musician talk as well, to get a wider variety of opinions.

I reeeeaaaaallllly want to be able to learn classical.

I personally do not know nor do I want to know any theory. I know I can play chords, but which ones I don't know, I play what I like to hear. in some peoples eyes I am a horrid player, and I have been told everything from I suck balls, to I should quit, or even kill myself. These people are idiots in my opinion. I myself in my eyes am the best guitarist in the world, because I am the best at expressing my own feelings through music, NO ONE else can express my own feelings better than I can. However I want to open up a venue where I can express myself better, I am limited by the guitars I use, and I want to utilize classical guitar, because I feel it will give me more options on notes per expression. If that makes any sense.....


Thanks much!
#2
Quote by pks330
However I want to open up a venue where I can express myself better, I am limited by the guitars I use, and I want to utilize classical guitar, because I feel it will give me more options on notes per expression. If that makes any sense.....


Thanks much!


You are limited by your imagination as well as your ears, the rest is only in your head. I've personally started out classical, for what was probably a year and a half, and I do not recall ever practicing. When I took to flamenco, about 10 years later, I had scarcely a problem picking it up again.

Now having played classical music for years as well, I suspect you'll have not a problem as long as you pay close attention to your body and sound. Don't get stuck in a certain technique, do not fall into the trap of 'wanting to make a movement a certain way' because someone told you that was the right way, what works for one person may not work for another and I advise you to try everything but listen to noone in the end.

Now as a last note, fingerpicking as a style, and classical music, are two worlds that are quite far apart. Now if you have a reasonable (classical) theoretical and historical knowledge of music, you may come to understand what musical tricks define fingerpicking other than simply using your fingers in a certain way, but classical music in itself is an entirely different beast which if you have no teacher, will require you to have very good ears, a lot of patience, and love for the subject.

Then again, most things require this, assuming you'll want to reach a decent level at it.

Good luck
Wise Man Says: The guitar is obviously female, she's got hips, breasts... and a hole.
UG's Flamenco Club
#3
I don't think you will have a problem learning fingerpicking, though it might take a while.

I think you mean playing a nylon string guitar, not classical music. (If I'm wrong, you need to do a reality check if you think you can learn it without at least being able to read standard notation and apply it to the fretboard.) I'm sure you could do some kinds of nylon string fingerpicking without that theoretical knowledge. You soon get used to the feel of the wider neck and sloppy feel of nylon strings, though as a steel string fingerpicker myself, I'm thinking of getting a more crossover style nylon string than classical. - Ie the Cordoba Fusion series.
Last edited by Tony Done at Jul 15, 2014,
#4
it won't be harder for you to learn to fingerpick or play classical because you've first learned to play with a pic, but it may not be easier for you regarding your right hand, either. btw, i've known guys who started playing at 50 and got really good, so like FretboardToAsh says, you're only limited by your imagination.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#5
As Tony is saying. Learning to play some sort of fingerstyle on a classical guitar should pose no problems.
Learning "Classical Guitar", with all that implies, is quite different. Also note that "Flamenco" is quite different than traditional Classical guitar.
A lot of folks who say "Flamenco" actually are referring to "contemporary Latin guitar"... Essentially Latin pop playing which does borrow some Flamenco techniques.

Classical is a disciplined study with it's own repertoire, technique, posture, etc. Learning to sight-read is considered essential, just as it would be with any classical music instruction.