#1
I lost one of my bridge pins so I
replaced with a new one from my another guitar,
But it has a different size

Would it be okay to use it?
#2
Might be. Only way to find out is to try it. But take care in case you encounter "flying bridge pin phenomena".
#3
My experience has been that Ibanez and Crafter as well, use a straight shank bridge pin. They're most likely interchangeable with each other, But I don't know the results of putting an earlier sytle tapered pin into those maker's bridges would be.

Ibanez calls thenm "advantage" bridge pins: http://shop.ibanez.com/p/5abp14f-advantage-bridge-pin-white-w-black-dot At six bucks a pop, I wonder to whom falls that "advantage".
#4
Quote by Captaincranky
At six bucks a pop, I wonder to whom falls that "advantage".


I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#5
If it fits, it is OK. I personally don't like bridge pins that don't seat fully in the hole, they look like an accident waiting to happen and can be hard to get out. OTOH, I have pins on one guitar that are so loose they will just fall out when the strings are slack, no problem because pressure from the string ball firmly holds them in when the string is under tension.
#7
Quote by Tony Done
If it fits, it is OK. I personally don't like bridge pins that don't seat fully in the hole, they look like an accident waiting to happen and can be hard to get out. OTOH, I have pins on one guitar that are so loose they will just fall out when the strings are slack, no problem because pressure from the string ball firmly holds them in when the string is under tension.


I was watching a relative video the other day posted by Martin Guitars.
And there was an expert technician of Martin, saying that they purposefully make the pins a bit thicker so that they seem they do not fit perfectly.
They stick out a bit and don't fall their entire body in the hole.

He then said that they do this because as the years pass, the holes wear out and their diameter increases. So , in time the pins will fall deeper into the holes but still they won't be loose to cause problems.

Martins are expected to be played for many years after all so they are forced to foresee things like that I guess.

Anyway, I found it interesting and it was unexpected to me and thought to share.
#8
Quote by gogonias
....[ ]...He then said that they do this because as the years pass, the holes wear out and their diameter increases. So , in time the pins will fall deeper into the holes but still they won't be loose to cause problems....[ ]....
Something this fails to take into account, is that the ball ends of the strings, are way harder than the soundboard and its braces. So, after a while, the string balls start to eat through the soundboard, (actually the stiffener around the sound hole, I think), regardless of whether or not the pins have seated, or are still sticking up.

My cure is saturating that section where the strings make contact, with cyanoacrylate adhesive, ("Crazy Glue" or similar).

Your methodology and / or results, may of course, vary.