#1
Ok, I have problems with writing bridges and transitions from verses to choruses and what not, like I write a good riff on guitar and then I sit there scratching my head like "How do I follow this up?" "how do I compliment this part" or even simply "how do I keep this song going?"

I find myself going to the F and F# chord a lot because it sounds different and it sounds like an obvious transition from one riff to another since I usually write in E or Eb....but that's not good enough, its like autopilot for me and even then I get stuck on the F/F# chord and I don't know how to go from there to anything else that isn't universally recognizable So how do I overcome it? I guess is the right question. Tips? Formulas?
Gear:
1987 Charvel Model II
2010 Carvin ST300C
1990 Charvette 100
1991 Ibanez RG560M
2006 Fender Mexi Strat
Jackson/Charvel Star W/ Custom Graphics.
Ovation CP 247 Acoustic
Line 6 POD HD Pro X
Pro Tools 9

Tutorial: Studio Quality Programmed Drum Sounds
#3
Yeah see I know theory a bit and I doesn't really help. Like if I do a 1-6-5, I find it really typical to go to the 2 chord, and then when I go to the 4 or the 7 chord it just sounds odd to me
Gear:
1987 Charvel Model II
2010 Carvin ST300C
1990 Charvette 100
1991 Ibanez RG560M
2006 Fender Mexi Strat
Jackson/Charvel Star W/ Custom Graphics.
Ovation CP 247 Acoustic
Line 6 POD HD Pro X
Pro Tools 9

Tutorial: Studio Quality Programmed Drum Sounds
#4
Other then using your own inner ear, that meaning, imagining the next sound;
Analyze the progressions in songs that you like, and see what they do, then, knowing your theory, you can replicate it and use it.

Learning inversions all over the neck for every chord type also helps a lot as they can sound quite different and beautiful.
And secondary dominants play a big role in a more "sophisticated" sound.
Last edited by Ignore at Jul 16, 2014,
#5
Actually I'm in a similar situation.

If I do something like A7, D, E for the verse then G, D, C D for the chorus finding a bridge progression. Like I get it's to extend the song and the professions I listed aren't typical....it's typical for the stuff I make.

So yeah...I'm watching this thread!
#6
Quote by flaaash
Actually I'm in a similar situation.

If I do something like A7, D, E for the verse then G, D, C D for the chorus finding a bridge progression. Like I get it's to extend the song and the professions I listed aren't typical....it's typical for the stuff I make.

So yeah...I'm watching this thread!


For that progression you could use a F-G-C progression and it would give it a different sound and it would be a smooth transition, now as far changing it up you could probably a B chord somewhere in there, provided the melody allows for it but that's probably what I would do....then feel guilty about it
Gear:
1987 Charvel Model II
2010 Carvin ST300C
1990 Charvette 100
1991 Ibanez RG560M
2006 Fender Mexi Strat
Jackson/Charvel Star W/ Custom Graphics.
Ovation CP 247 Acoustic
Line 6 POD HD Pro X
Pro Tools 9

Tutorial: Studio Quality Programmed Drum Sounds
#7
Come up with vocal melodies. When I'm writing and I come up with a verse riff, for instance, I'll try to come up with a vocal melody over it. That melody usually indicates to me what the next part should sound like. Does it get quiter or louder? Does it call for a key chance? That usually gives me a pretty good idea of what I should be doing on guitar.
#8
A common way is to do your bridge in the relative minor/major key of whatever your song is in. So if your song is in C, do your bridge in A minor. It changes up the song, kind of makes you forget about the original feeling for a while and then that makes the ending more exciting when you go back to the original key. So, you play a lot in Em, so try doing a bridge in GM.

Or sometimes you don't have to do anything different but change up the strumming pattern. For instance, Can't Stop (RHCP), the bridge follows the same chord progression as the intro/verse, it's just strummed chords instead of a riff. But they actually do the chorus in the relative major (GM) which is their way of changing keys instead of the bridge.

Don't be afraid to learn what other artists/songs do. Look what they do and apply it to your song. Don't worry about "stealing" their idea, because they stole it from someone, who stole it from someone, who stole it from someone else, etc.
Earth without ART, is just Eh...
#10
Quote by Sean0913
I find a lot of bridges start from the IV.


I think that's very common, because the IV often feels like it's "going somewhere."

The relative and parallel majors or minors are also common choices.

But really, the way to figure out how to write a bridge is to go listen to a bunch of bridges. Figure out, by ear, what a dozen songs you love, in the genre that you're trying to write, are doing in their bridges.

Because we can point to things like starting on the IV, and that might happen to be true for the music we're listening to, but that might be different music from the music you're listening to. You might find that what we like sounds cliched and obvious to you. And if you write a song because somebody on the internet said, "A lot of songs do X" then you're, on some level, writing it because of the cliche.

Use your ears. Study the music you love (BY EAR!). The music you love, filtered through your brain, will lead you places that only you can go.