#1
Me and my two friends (Brian and Dillon) want to start recording covers of our favorite songs. I can play guitar/drums, Brian can play keyboard/drums, and all three of us can sing, I have more of a mid-range tone, Brian has a deeper voice and Dillon can hit higher notes than us. I realize we don't have bass but it's hard to find anybody in my area that can play an instrument. We don't really have a specific type of music we play, because my favorite is punk/metalcore, and Dillon and Brian's is more pop so we play really anything we can as long as all of us like it. The problem is we don't know how to actually record ourselves. There is an endless list of different recording microphones for all different types of things but I would like to know if there is one that can be kind of an "all-around" and record most of anything with decent quality. Were not looking to sound like professionals, we just want something a little more sophisticated than playing the instrument next to the computer haha. Also I've only messed around with Garageband and don't know if its worth including with recording/mixing the sound. One more thing, I would like to know which room would be more suitable for home recording and what we could do to create less interference in recording. Thank you for replies.
"One good thing about music, when it hits you, you feel no pain."- Bob Marley
#3
Besides the ample information here, check out this thread and this one at homerecording.com. Do a lot of reading (and ask specific questions) before buying gear.
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#4
You can start simple and build up on it. Too big of a question to answer in one sweep...

Garageband is good enough to get started. I'd even recommend a dedicated multitracker that doesn't have too many options, like a Zoom R16 (or one of the Tascams, Boss, Fostex units) which will let you learn the basics on its own and then when ready you can expand and connect to a computer as an audio interface.

One all rounder mic that can capture everything decently, like Audio Technica AT2020 or a dynamic like Shure PG57 if on budget or SM57 if not on budget and go from there. If you want to record everything at the same time you'd need an interface/recorder that can record as many audio sources you'd need at a time.
Last edited by diabolical at Jul 16, 2014,
#5
Get yourself a basic interface (1/4inch to usb ) I have both a fasttrack pro by m-audio and a line 6 podx3 both these allow me to hook up my instruments straight to my pc then you want a recording program ( I would go with cubace but theres so much choice just google it and pick one that you like from theres its a question of learning how your gear works in order to get sound from your instrument to your computer ! Best of luck!!!
#6
I would recommend for an interface a fasttrack pro for easy recording, but as far as microphones go the SM57 seems to be a well-rounded choice and probably an SM58 for vocals. They don't break the bank either.
#7
I would recommend for an interface a fasttrack pro for easy recording, but as far as microphones go the SM57 seems to be a well-rounded choice and probably an SM58 for vocals. They don't break the bank either.
#9
I agree with the 57 instrument and 58 vox ive used this oonce for a demo and the quality was surprising! (Dont forget you want a flat room no reverb or outside noise)
#10
57 and 58 are essentially same mic, same capsule and the 58 has added windscreen and pop filter. You can get away with 57 on vox and guitar, just buy pop filter or make one out of stockings. Alternately Sent e835 works also great if not better as mic for both.
#11
Before I start, let me ask why you want to make these recordings. Why? Different recordings have different purposes. If you want to simply hear what your rehearsals or gigs sound like, a Zoom H2 is a fantastic and inexpensive piece of gear that is easy to use. If you need a high quality demo to get gigs or whatever, consider booking into a local project studio where you'll spend not too much money to work with someone else who already has the gear and the know-how to get you there. If you want to release an album, do at the very least option B and take your time with it, or even save up for a pro studio.

However, if your reason for this is because you want to learn to record, then read on... with the following caveats:
1. Learning this takes time. You were a crappy guitarist after playing for six months and entirely not yet ready to gig for people. The person down the street from you was a crappy carpenter after six months and entirely not yet ready to make furniture for anything other than occasional use at the cottage. Like any other skill, be prepared to spend years getting really good at it.
2. It's going to cost you. You don't gig with a $200 rig. The carpenter down the street mostly doesn't do screw all with $200 worth of tools either. Once you get into this, you'll find your gear collection breeding like rabbits. (that will be money that you will probably no longer be spending on guitar stuff, assuming you will need to prioritize your spending....) If you want to start making release-ready recordings, you'll be spending thousands of dollars, just like the auto mechanic, carpenter, dentist, chef, etc. will spend a good deal of money on their tools.

The long and the short of it is this.... if you want a recording, spend a couple hundred dollars at a project studio, and get it done this weekend. If you want to learn to record, then your so-called "home recording" will take at least a couple of years and a couple thousand dollars or so. But then you'll have a new skill set, and some tools to support it.

Quote by JacobyDB
There is an endless list of different recording microphones for all different types of things but I would like to know if there is one that can be kind of an "all-around" and record most of anything with decent quality.


Think of mics like saws. Different ones are used for different purposes. You have scroll saws, hacksaws, coping saws, reciprocating saws, cross-cut saws, miter saws, etc. Is there one good all-arounder that can cut mostly anything most of the time? No. Often times, a circular saw will cut most of the things you want most of the time, but I'd sooner cut my own head off than to try to use one for fine detailing.

Mics are like that. An SM57 is like your circular saw. It will get you a decent recording on most things most of the time. But geez.... there really is so much that it doesn't do well, or at least doesn't do as well as a myriad of other mics, not all of which cost a ton of money. (like drum overheads.... a better bet would be the Behringer ECM8000's, which come in at a third of the price of the SM57; or like kick drum.... a better bet would be the Sennheiser e602 which you could probably get used for not much more than the price of a new SM57; or like most voices.... a better bet would be something like an AT2020 or a Behringer C1, both of which cost less than a 57)

The problem is, the ECM8000's will totally suck for your vocals (probably), the 602 will sound like ass for drum overheads, and the C1 would most definitely not be my first choice for kick. You need a collection of mics like you need a collection of saws, if you're going to do much of anything, anyways.


Quote by JacobyDB
One more thing, I would like to know which room would be more suitable for home recording and what we could do to create less interference in recording. Thank you for replies.


Go into any given room. Stand in the center of the room and clap your hands. Move around towards the perimeter of the room and clap your hands. If you hear an echo-ey, hollow, or ringing kind of sound, it's not a good room to record in. (The reason for the hand clap over, say, speaking, is that it is a sudden transient, so you'll hear the decay rate. You won't hear it near as well with something like talking in the room, but the mics will.)

Diabolical suggested the Sennheiser e835. If I had one "desert island mic under $200", I'm pretty sure that would be it. (not that I have any inkling of what I might record WITH on a desert island.... haha....) IMHO, it beats the pants off any SM57/58 or similar mic out there. Side-by-side, singing through an 835 makes the SM58 particularly sound like you're singing through moving blankets. Also, Sennheiser has an outstanding pedigree as a brand. (as does Shure....). The MD421 and MD441 are legendary. They also own and manufacture Neumann mics. Their evolution series (any mic prefixed with an "e", like the e835, e602, e906, etc.) are all great mics for their price ranges. I highly recommend it.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Jul 19, 2014,
#13
^ Yes!!

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.