#1
Can anyone give me some advice on landing a gig as a broadway pit musician? I know its a lofty dream, but this is something I'd really love to do after college, and I'm willing to work my hardest to make it reality!


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Last edited by bakgwan at Jul 16, 2014,
#2
Learn to blow directors.

Hint: They have very sensitive balls.
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#3
(Imagine I posted a kind of funny, half-assed joke about this being the pit. I really tried, but I just couldn't.)
#4
Quote by Oyface
(Imagine I posted a kind of funny, half-assed joke about this being the pit. I really tried, but I just couldn't.)

Oh wow, yeah that's a perfect concept.
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#5
Go get a degree/diploma in jazz/contemporary guitar performance and gig a shit load in as many styles as you can with as many people as you can. Focus on chard reading and sight reading extensively. I would also take some classical guitar lessons as well (at least a few years to get the basic stuff down). It will give your fingerstyle based styles an extremely good foundation, and will help your sight-reading a LOT.
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Unless you're sure she likes you, telling her you like her has a 110% chance of failing.

But hey, at least you have a 10% chance of absolutely guaranteeing failure.
#6
Just get as many pit gigs as you can. Ask around at local theaters. You have to know how to read music and play in multiple styles. The guitar music for most shows I've played in has been kind of tricky to figure out because of how it's written, so sometimes you just have to go through the book while listening to the broadway recorded CD and it will be easier to figure the parts out. Also, some books call for doubling on mandolin, dobro, banjo, etc. and almost all call for a variety of guitars (electric, classical, acoustic, etc.) and effects.


They also tend to have a lot of parts with capos that are transposed incorrectly or in a way which is more difficult to read than it needs to be. But if you know how to read music (which you have to) then you will be fine. They really should get actual guitar players to edit the parts before publishing the books, but apparently they never bother to do that.
Last edited by MeGaDeth2314 at Jul 16, 2014,
#7
I'm pretty certain there's never been a piece of traditional notation written for guitar that was written by a person who had actually played guitar before.
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#8
Quote by snipelfritz
I'm pretty certain there's never been a piece of traditional notation written for guitar that was written by a person who had actually played guitar before.



I don't know where you're getting this idea from? There are tons of guitarists who transcribe their own music...just apparently not broadway composers.