#1
I finally decided to put time and effort in learning music theory. because for a long time i tried to play what sounds good to me. I truly believe that a first hand information from a teacher is the best way to go. But i cannot afford to pay it because i also support my family. and if its affordable, i cannot seem to find any musician in the place where i live (place where theres a lot of farms and open fields).

So my last resort is the internet. but when i search the google or youtube there are so many scattered information so i get a little bit confuse where to start or where to go next. sometimes they say a little bit of good information but to continue you need to subscribe or pay them. or sometimes i watch like 15mins videos but in the end i learn something not helpful at all.

what i would like to see is like a lesson plan. like what you see when you open table of contents of a book. step by step, from lvl 0 to lvl 99 topic to another topic. are there any downloadable ebooks, or sites that guided you as well? I will be very grateful for any kind of help. thanks alot
Last edited by vintoz04 at Jul 18, 2014,
#2
Yes, by now as you can tell , the internet is littered with guitar lessons all over the place. I got a good start learning the fundamentals of theory from Doug Mark's Metal Method course, the old and new version. I believe the new version is level 6, and old is level 5...get both. They should give you a good jump start. Doug Marks is one of the few instructors I came across that seems like he genuinely cares and tries in helping the student understand in the most simplest way possible. His lessons are well put together.

Check out Creative guitar studio or musictheory.net

The thing is....you can read about theory all day, but you really need to learn how to apply it.
Last edited by Unreal T at Jul 18, 2014,
#3
Quote by Unreal T
Yes, by now as you can tell , the internet is littered with guitar lessons all over the place. I got a good start learning the fundamentals of theory from Doug Mark's Metal Method course, the old and new version. I believe the new version is level 6, and old is level 5...get both. They should give you a good jump start. Doug Marks is one of the few instructors I came across that seems like he genuinely cares and tries in helping the student understand in the most simplest way possible. His lessons are well put together.

Check out Creative guitar studio or musictheory.net

The thing is....you can read about theory all day, but you really need to learn how to apply it.


thanks man, i will definitely check what you gave me. and yes im will try to apply music theory. thats my goal actually. before i didnt care much about theory. for im a fan of dimebag and he said he doesnt know theory.but when i discovered satriani, he emphasized how much important it is. and i can hear the difference from his music. but
again, thanks.
#4
Quote by vintoz04


what i would like to see is like a lesson plan. like what you see when you open table of contents of a book. step by step, from lvl 0 to lvl 99 topic to another topic. are there any downloadable ebooks, or sites that guided you as well? I will be very grateful for any kind of help. thanks alot


Harmony and Theory, by Shroeder and Wyatt, if you want a step-by-step textbook.

If you would rather have a structured lesson plan that focuses on practical examples (eg, songs you know) then check out "Songwriting Secrets of the Beatles" by Pedler.

That being said, you do not know a piece of theory until you can hear it in practice. This can not be emphasized enough. You MUST develop your ear while you learn theory, and make sure you can HEAR what the books are talking about. Otherwise you don't really know it.
#5
John Oswin's music theory videos on YouTube (I think he has around 40 or so) are absolutely fantastic. I learned more about music theory from his lessons than everything else put together. His ways of remembering chords are brilliant and *they really work* to help me remember exactly how all the chords are constructed. It's been a big help to my guitar, bass and piano playing.
#7
First, I would suggest ignoring any sort of shortcut method. Don't look at a tab, a scale pattern/chart, etc. Learn the actual notes you are playing and why you are playing them.

The 3 most important things I would say are:
Learn the notes on the fret board (so you can apply your theory - which is the point)
Learn keys/scales
Learn how to make major and minor chords

That is the foundation and also 99.9% of the stuff you will need. Other things you can do later and they will be easier to understand.

And go SLOW and be patient. Start with one key (and remember when you learn a major key, you also are learning a minor key, and vice versa). I would suggest C since there are no sharps or flats. It's better to know one key REALLY well than several poorly. Also, I would suggest getting a loop station if you don't have one because playing a progression into it and soloing/improvising over it is an amazing way to apply your knowledge to the guitar.

Also, learn the guitar one string at a time. Then add a string. Then try to connect it with the one you already know. Then add another, etc.
Earth without ART, is just Eh...
#8
Learn note names, intervals, the major and minor scales and keys, scale and chord construction and chord functions. I would start with note names and intervals but they all kind of overlap each other.

And yeah, you need to listen to the sounds, not just learn it on paper. Otherwise it's really hard to understand theory because music is all about sound.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#9
thanks again, so i guess il start memorizing notes in the fretboard first.
#10
Id also recommend checking out Sarah Spisak's Melodic Principals for Rock Guitar, again by Metal Method guitar lessons. I think she offers some really structured and invaluable lessons. Very underrated lessons.
#13
If you can't afford a teacher. I would recommend buying a book.

The method I use is called ''The AB guide to music theory''. It covers basic theory. I'm progressing very slowly because I also need to do a lot of school stuff and sometimes I just forget it exists. But if I do read it. It's a blessing. It explains everything very well.