#1
I need help , cuz my skills is so common and un-melodic
any suggestions? tools maybe?,
#2
Post a video and we'll be able to help, right now we have nothing to go of off
"Music Without Emotion Is Like Food Without Flavour"
Paul Gilbert
#3
I can tell you what worked for me, Start listening to the blues! That way you will develop a sense for classic rock/bluesy guitar solos. While you're doing that learn the blues scale. It is just like the pentatonic scale with an additional blues note. Make sure you learn all of the five positions. That way you will know where the scale is all over the neck. Then try to combine all of the five positions anyway you can and throw in some bends and slides. Gradually you will start to get better at it. It's not that hard really, it can be a lot of fun once you get the hang of it.

I found this video by Marty and it helped me a lot, it's a good way to use the blues scale but don't just get stuck on that. Come up with your own variations as well.

Here's the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TfDmVwz24lE

It's in the key of A. It would be best for you to start in that key from the fifth Fret.

Good luck and let us know how it goes!
#4
Justin Guitar has a full course on Blues Lead Guitar.

A lot of rock licks are just recycled blues licks.
#5
I'd say practice, as with anything. After a while you'll get a feeling for what seems to work with certain kinds of music, because the feel is entirely different for genres (in my opinion). I find playing with others to be a very nice way to get inspiration, not only because of the way they play, but also because the way you interact changes the way you approach the music. Being great at developing musical ideas that work is pretty much what most professional artists are busy with, so improvising it is pretty difficult to do well (creating anything someone actually wants to hear).

If you're talking about the actual playing instead of developing musical ideas: learn how to play what you hear in your head. In the same way that you can hum musical lines when you're listening to music, you should be able to actually play what you hear in your head. I used to exclusively rely on scales and I still think they're a solid basis to start out, but after you know them easily, it's interesting to try and incorporate notes that wouldn't typically fall in the scale you're playing, and experimenting with sound.

Actually knowing what you're playing over helps immensely as well, so knowing/hearing which chords are played while you're playing can be interesting for musical ideas. Music theory helped me a lot, so I can definitely recommend it, but there are way more accomplished guitar players here who know a lot more about it.