#1
If you could go back in time to your prior self, and reprioritize some things, or change how you learned in some way, or teach yourself some things earlier on, what would you change in how you learned?
#3
I wouldn't change a thing with how I learned. Personally, I think I did everything in a good way and balanced the priority of theory and playing ability rather well.


Though I would go back a few years and tell myself to stop being a lazy slob and stop slacking with the practice.
I would probably go all out and wear some 'futuristic' style clothing and obtain a DeLorean for the trip, tell myself that if I stop being lazy my music will bring world peace and I shall be worshiped as a God.
That aught to be motivation enough.
When I was eleven I broke the patio window and my mother sued me... She's always been a very aggressive litigator.
#4
Tell myself to not take that year off of playing. Other then that I wish I had started a lot earlier, but my 5 years of playing seemed to work out when I look back. So I can't complain. Plus a million for your idea to yourself link no1
#5
I wouldn't change a thing. The struggles I had, built ultimately into what I teach today. I don't think if I'd have had it easy that I'd have the life I have now, teaching people from all over the world, having my own school, and being able to touch the lives of thousands of people. Wouldn't change a thing.

It's hard to explain if you haven't been there, but for little old me to be here in one physical place here in Texas, and to get an email from someone in the Philippines about how awesome their jam session was last night, or to be forwarded a song that a guy in the UK wrote for his wife on their anniversary, and to know that you had a hand in teaching that person, opening their eyes, expanding their musical reach, that enabled these experiences. I swear my mind can't really fathom it. I get chills just writing this.

I wouldn't change a thing...nothing. I was meant to do this. The path I took, though I had no clue about where it would ultimately lead, was the path I was supposed to take.

So, today, I'm just in a constant state of gratitude for it all.

Anything I haven't done yet...there's still time, I can still read, hear, move my limbs, and understand things. There are a LOT of things I'm not....but my story isn't fully written yet either, and for me that's a good thing.

I don't think it's for me alone though. I think for all of us, our story isn't written yet, so instead of regrets on what we haven't done, we can still evolve and do those things now. There's something very empowering about that awareness.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jul 19, 2014,
#6
I would've practiced with a metronome all the time, learned as much about theory as possible, recorded myself when I was just messing around, and wrote songs instead of just riffs.
I didn't have the patience for any of those at the time though.

The only regret I have is that I wish I had kept playing instead of letting it just sit there and collect dust for so long.
#7
I would have started way earlier and learned proper theory. Also, I wouldn't have stopped learning hard songs to improve, now I just played a lot for fun rather then going for progression once in a while.
#9
Looking back I can't regret anything but awareness is key to life.

Knowing that the sound I was mostly looking for could be found in a Mesa/Boogie Quad pre amp. I could have saved going through a few amps.

It would always sound better plugged straight in to a tube amp with no effects. No Boss pedals or Digitech is going to last and make your tone come out better.

Playing with vintage old amps are fun though do not exept them to sound like your heros. A Marshall Major 200 watt does not have gain and Blackmores were modified.

Go for the guitar you really want despite of price and if its available in a store or the like. No substitute is going to do it completely.

Always play in tune and in time. Whenever you play/practise etc.

Playing a Stratocaster versus a Jackson shows your chops and skills more clearly.

Tab books are great but not always accurate. You can benefit a lot from learning from them.

Learning on you own is fine if you can focus and control your self.

Lastly it is about making music that people would love to hear do never forget that!
#10
I would have learned how to transcribe my own music ideas earlier on and proper timing, rather than just "play by feel". You can only get so far from "playing by feel". I wish I understood timing much more when I first picked up the guitar.
#11
I'd have started earlier.

It's tempting to say I'd have also practised more efficiently etc. and been more serious about theory etc. a lot earlier, but at the same time hindsight's 20:20. Plus I still enjoy it so I must have been doing something right. It's entirely possible (especially with my personality type ) that had I taken a much more academic/efficient approach I'd have just got browned off with it and quit, or at least turned it more into a chore.
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#12
I would have learned more about intervals. I've been playing guitar for about 2.5 years, and only learned why, for example, a minor third is called a minor third about three months ago. I also had problems with some chords, so I wish I had practiced them more. Lastly, I wish I had started playing earlier.
Gear:

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"Music is the strongest form of magic." - Marilyn Manson
#13
I think the only thing I would change is how pretentious and close-minded I was for the first 5 years I was playing.

I always turned my nose up when I saw a lesson online or information having to do with learning theory. I wanted to go about it on my own. I had this weird preconceived notion that the good players out there never learned a lick of theory. That theory would somehow hinder me. In a lot of ways I can see how it could have in the first few years of playing, but to ignore it for so long was a mistake.

I had the ability. I was born with a pretty damn good ear and could tab things out very well from the get-go, but if I had sat down and learned what the CAGED system was and spent some time learning notes, scales, and how they relate to the key of a song instead of fret numbers, I would probably be a better player than I am now.

I still put together a whole lot of it on my own. When I sat down and learned some theory, more often than not, I would be like "ooooh, so that's what that thing is called. It has a name.", but at the same time, I probably would have learned it faster if I would have been less of a snob about it all and just sat down with a theory book 2 years into my playing rather than 5.

I realized that learning guitar with theory and learning guitar without theory were the same thing. Anyone can put together concepts and understand it all, with or without the language that theory gives you. The only difference is that theory is all there and written out. That thing you might learn a year from now (one of those epiphany moments) on your own was written in that book sitting on your shelf years before you were even born.

Anyway, TL;DR: Don't be afraid to learn some theory, and don't think that you'll be better if you never pick up a theory book. We actually learn theory as we understand music and our instrument better whether it's by the book or in our own head.

The thing is, when you hit one of the many brick walls you hit as a player, a theory book will more than likely teach you something new about music that will open a window in that wall.
#14
My brother broke my guitar a few years after I bought it. I was still learning, and not practicing often. I would have definitely practiced more and saved for a new guitar when I started working shortly after.
I didn't actually pick up guitar more seriously again until recently, but if I could go back I'd have never stopped.
I'd also have taught myself more picking techniques, different style songs, etc. earlier on instead of just sticking with the basics and only attempting songs that I enjoyed at the time.
That sounds weird, but those songs were super easy and boring to play.
I've never been into bands like Metallica until I started attempting their songs. That style has grown on me, made me a much better guitarist and made playing more enjoyable for me.
Last edited by TheMagicGnome at Jul 19, 2014,
#15
Quote by mjones1992
I think the only thing I would change is how pretentious and close-minded I was for the first 5 years I was playing.

I always turned my nose up when I saw a lesson online or information having to do with learning theory. I wanted to go about it on my own. I had this weird preconceived notion that the good players out there never learned a lick of theory. That theory would somehow hinder me. In a lot of ways I can see how it could have in the first few years of playing, but to ignore it for so long was a mistake.

I had the ability. I was born with a pretty damn good ear and could tab things out very well from the get-go, but if I had sat down and learned what the CAGED system was and spent some time learning notes, scales, and how they relate to the key of a song instead of fret numbers, I would probably be a better player than I am now.

I still put together a whole lot of it on my own. When I sat down and learned some theory, more often than not, I would be like "ooooh, so that's what that thing is called. It has a name.", but at the same time, I probably would have learned it faster if I would have been less of a snob about it all and just sat down with a theory book 2 years into my playing rather than 5.

I realized that learning guitar with theory and learning guitar without theory were the same thing. Anyone can put together concepts and understand it all, with or without the language that theory gives you. The only difference is that theory is all there and written out. That thing you might learn a year from now (one of those epiphany moments) on your own was written in that book sitting on your shelf years before you were even born.

Anyway, TL;DR: Don't be afraid to learn some theory, and don't think that you'll be better if you never pick up a theory book. We actually learn theory as we understand music and our instrument better whether it's by the book or in our own head.

The thing is, when you hit one of the many brick walls you hit as a player, a theory book will more than likely teach you something new about music that will open a window in that wall.


I would say the same thing to myself. I would explain I-ii-iii-IV-V-vi-viio to me earlier, and what the key is. I would also have wanted to pickup the acoustic guitar earlier, and gotten more serious about music sooner.

Also, I would have worked out the barre chord muscles a lot more. And although I'm glad to have the option to play with my thumb wrapped around for the power chords, but the barre is powerful position, if you can really keep the barre with your index finger with enough strength to do whatever you want with the other fingers. Wish I would have practiced that earlier.

EDIT: also, no shortcuts. Unless something is physically impossible then work at it until you get it. Except for the most part only work that hard at things that are useful in many situations. Or, if you play set pieces obviously, then you just have to get it all down perfectly. But I'm more of a freestyle kind of person, in general. Which, includes putting time into doing it a harder way, if it means being able to do more, once you master it.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Jul 20, 2014,
#17
Work on ear training earlier than I did. Six years of playing and I've only recently started to focus on my ear training over the past year (it's improved a lot, though).

Another thing would probably have been stopping lessons from my teacher sooner than I did. I quit them back in May due to the fact that I wasn't learning from that teacher anymore after like 4 years of lessons. He was a nice guy and a great player, but as for teaching, he wasn't really helpful beyond the basics. I've been considering looking around for other teachers so they can help develop further as a musician.
Skip the username, call me Billy
#19
MODES!

No.

I would have practiced with a metronome/drum machine much earlier.
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