#1
Hi all,

So i'm making a guitar, but since this is the first time I've ever done it I need some help.

The guitar has a mahogany body and mahogany neck, with a quilted maple top on the body and headstock.

The thing I need help is with how I'm going to paint the guitar.

I live in Australia and Nitrocellulose is extremely expensive (or from what I can find), I will do the standard black water based ink on the maple sanded off and then stained blue.

My questions are:

1. Do I need to prime the maple top with 1k or 2k or whatever?
2. Same thing but with the mahogany body^.
3. What do I do after the blue staining.
4. I have access to Polyurethrane sprays, but I'm not too sure how to apply it.
5. What do I need to buy?
6. How do I paint the body black (fully opaque), again no nitrocellulose.

Those are the questions I currently have in mind,
Thanks in advance.
#2
You dont prime with 2k if you are using polyurethane. 2k is auto clear, and if you are are using it you only use it, nothing else.
You need to grainfill the mahogany first.
You can brush polyurethane, but it will take a lot to get to look good. Spraying is really the only way to go while doing guitar work.
You paint the guitar black by painting it black... then clear coating.
#3
Quote by Explorerbuilder
You dont prime with 2k if you are using polyurethane. 2k is auto clear, and if you are are using it you only use it, nothing else.
You need to grainfill the mahogany first.
You can brush polyurethane, but it will take a lot to get to look good. Spraying is really the only way to go while doing guitar work.
You paint the guitar black by painting it black... then clear coating.


Thanks, what paint do I use, can I use some acrylic spray paints?
#4
The first question I'd ask is what sort of finish do you want? Satin/gloss? There are a ton of ways to get a nice satin finish but if you're looking for gloss it's probably going to be poly.

Be mindful of the weather at the moment too. I know where I am (SA) it's bloody wet and freezing recently. Humidity + spray does not mix - especially on clears.
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#5
Quote by N_J_B_B
The first question I'd ask is what sort of finish do you want? Satin/gloss? There are a ton of ways to get a nice satin finish but if you're looking for gloss it's probably going to be poly.

Be mindful of the weather at the moment too. I know where I am (SA) it's bloody wet and freezing recently. Humidity + spray does not mix - especially on clears.


Yeah I'm looking for an extremely glossy finish. We only had a bit of rain recently and in my basement there is hardly any moisture. My main concern is how to spray without getting an uneven coat or dripping.
#7
I just painted one of my guitars and it turned out nearly flawless with no prior experience.

I used some plain rattle cans of acrylic spray paint. But these are the important things you need: (kung fu wisdom inbound)

- Common Sense - Don't under any circumstances paint in an enclosed area, or when it's wet, or spray too much at a time

- Patience - I took probably two weeks painting mine three colors. Probably overkill, but that paint sure was dry.

I was thinking of a third thing but forgot. Whoops. Anyway, pretty much all else is secondary to the first two. Don't rush it. It's faster to take your time and do a lot of really thin coats than it is to mess up and start over.

Oh, and the link if you wanted to see:
http://electricguitargear.blogspot.com/2014/06/how-to-paint-squier-strat.html

Good luck with your guitar!
#8
I used black acrylic on mine and clear-coated with rustoleum specialty clear lacquer, High gloss finish and cheap depending where you buy it, comes in a spray can.
#9
Quote by Matt (GGR)
I just painted one of my guitars and it turned out nearly flawless with no prior experience.

I used some plain rattle cans of acrylic spray paint. But these are the important things you need: (kung fu wisdom inbound)

- Common Sense - Don't under any circumstances paint in an enclosed area, or when it's wet, or spray too much at a time

- Patience - I took probably two weeks painting mine three colors. Probably overkill, but that paint sure was dry.

I was thinking of a third thing but forgot. Whoops. Anyway, pretty much all else is secondary to the first two. Don't rush it. It's faster to take your time and do a lot of really thin coats than it is to mess up and start over.

Oh, and the link if you wanted to see:
http://electricguitargear.blogspot.com/2014/06/how-to-paint-squier-strat.html

Good luck with your guitar!

The third point is probably related to patience - many thin coats > any number of thick coats.

Applying spray paint(or clear) in thin coats prevents the paint beading, and gives a more even finish.