#1
Hi, I'm sorry for making another thread but I have a few questions. First what are the basics to writing what they call "Brutal Death Metal" and how would I aproach the subject. I'd like some theory and tips aside from "the learn some of it" (I have trouble with things such as ccomplexity, high tempos, and of course palm-muting) or "listen to more of it" (I do listen to it). I'm quite fond of bands like Cannibal Corpse, Dying Fetus, Behemoth (Blackened Death Metal) and Dethklok (Melodic Death Metal).
Second how does one get that "grind" sound (you know like grindcore)? I'd like just the basics (chord progressions, scales, basics, techniques, ect) and how the style works (I'm not a fan but think the sound is intriguing). I'm not asking for "Grindcore scales" here but tips. I know it's related to Punk but what else? I'd suggestions, not jerk comments like "Grindcore sucks" or jokes like "play punk really fast and sloppy".

One Shot One Kill by Dying Fetus
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9JFosCClvNQ
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#2
There are some great tabs on UG. Napalm death, suffocation, carcass, defeated sanity, beneath the massacre, incantation, king diamond, cryptopsy. But, you will be lucky to get a harmonic analysis of a rock fusion tab these days let alone any kind of heavy metal comprehension. Everyone talks about the basics of pentatonic and diminished triads but never speak out side the box of a natural modal chord cycle.

I would say write every riff in the same key and put the chorus a b3 from the main root. also, the heavy "Bridge" or breakdown sections normally slow about 7bpm every 8 bars and cycle the bass line to a 5th on root instead of a straight unison. So use Edim pentatonic and Gmin dim pentatonic for all your riffs every song. Learning to harmonise like iron maiden and metallica "justice for all" and being able to program drums and understand rhythm rudiments phonetically is also a plus. Imho, probably the most creative of contemporary performance structures, you might find it easiest to record your riffs ad-hoc unquantised on the computer and then add backing to the recording, worry about the global tempo quantise later. wish I could help more.
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Last edited by 094568029434geo at Jul 20, 2014,
#3
Quote by 094568029434geo
use Edim pentatonic and Gmin dim pentatonic for all your riffs every song

I couldn't disagree more with this kind of statement. A genre is NOT about using X & Y scales. You can use any scale, IF you use it in a manner that fits what you are going for.

Also, Grindcore isn't really related to Punk. Early on, it was related to Hardcore (aka "Hardcore Punk"), but that is its own separate thing from Punk and always has been. I would say Grindcore and Death Metal were the first instances of Extreme Metal (followed closely by Black Metal) after Thrash Metal.

Anyway, learn from the greats. Study them. Find out what "worked" and what "didn't work". Be inspired. A short list of the "Grindcore greats":
  • Terrorizer
  • Repulsion
  • Carcass (early work)
  • Napalm Death
  • Agathocles
  • Impetigo
  • Blood
  • Gut
  • Brutal Truth
  • Exhumed
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Jul 21, 2014,
#4
Quote by RonaldPoe
Hi, I'm sorry for making another thread but I have a few questions. First what are the basics to writing what they call "Brutal Death Metal" and how would I aproach the subject. I'd like some theory and tips aside from "the learn some of it" (I have trouble with things such as ccomplexity, high tempos, and of course palm-muting) or "listen to more of it" (I do listen to it.)


Very few types of music allow you to learn their fundamentals by reading an essay on them. You need to immerse yourself in the subject matter and analyze what is happening, and when it comes to music like grindcore or a lot of death metal you should think more conceptually than theoretically.

If you hope to recreate this music with any sense of character then you will need to do it this way, otherwise, you may as well be wasting your time.
#5
I think minor Seconds and Tritones are a large part of it. They really epitomize the dissonance elements. Take a standard thing that sounds good, and vary that good note by shifting it a half step away in either direction. These are all hallmark "moves" of this genre.

Best,

Sean
#6
Quote by Sean0913
I think minor Seconds and Tritones are a large part of it. They really epitomize the dissonance elements. Take a standard thing that sounds good, and vary that good note by shifting it a half step away in either direction. These are all hallmark "moves" of this genre.

Best,

Sean


^ That's a great way to describe it IMO.
#7
Sig contains the answer
Quote by AlanHB
It's the same as all other harmony. Surround yourself with skulls and candles if it helps.