#1
how do you memorize chord notes? a minor is a c e but the notes that you play appear a e a c e open a minor
#2
learn the theory behind what makes up the chord (i.e. intervals). E.g. minor chord is root, minor third and fifth.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#3
A chord is a theoretical concept. It doesn't tell you how high the notes are or what order they're played in. "Voicing" is the term applied to how the performer plays a given chord.

There are a few rules-of-thumb regarding voicing. One such rule is that the third need only appear once in the chord.

If you've got two or more octaves in the chord, you're generally going to have the third in the top octave, the fifth in the middle octave, and if you have a bass player, another root note a whole octave down. This is called "open voicing" and examples include your "open Am", "open E," and "F shape barre chord."

"Closed voicing" is when you have only one octave and the notes appear in the slightly more obvious order of root, third, fifth. Examples are "open C" where the notes are C, E, G, C, E.

Once you understand this you should find it easier to link new chord shapes to the ones you already know. You may notice, for example, that an A barre chord on the 5th fret has the same intervals as the open A shape only with an extra root note in the top octave.

Hope this helps with your question!
Last edited by Declan87 at Jul 20, 2014,
#4
I know what chords use what noes maj 1 3 5 min 1 b3 5 Aug 1 #3 #5 and Dim 1 b3 b5 I need help memorizing how they appear G B D appears as G B D G B G
#5
Quote by tyawesome1
I know what chords use what noes maj 1 3 5 min 1 b3 5 Aug 1 #3 #5 and Dim 1 b3 b5 I need help memorizing how they appear G B D appears as G B D G B G

That's because some notes in your chord are doubled. Actually you have 3 G's there which is absolutely unnecessary.
Last edited by Elintasokas at Jul 21, 2014,
#6
Quote by Dave_Mc
learn the theory behind what makes up the chord (i.e. intervals). E.g. minor chord is root, minor third and fifth.


This is, in my opinion, one of the few truly useful subjects in 'traditional' music theory.

I do think that it is rather pointless to just memorise 'A minor' and 'G7' and so on. Learning about the chord structures and legitimately understanding them is better than taking the shortcut and just memorising chords as they appear on a chord chart.

Intervals are pretty basic and in my opinion the single most important aspect of understanding tonality. A strong understanding of intervals and how they shape chords will allow to improvise and use chords as they come to you.

If you want you could also just sample them; that's a perfectly valid method as well.
#7
Quote by tyawesome1
how do you memorize chord notes? a minor is a c e but the notes that you play appear a e a c e open a minor


I'm a little unclear - are you trying to know, just, theoretically, what notes make up a chord? Or are you trying to remember a way to play it on the guitar?
#8
I know how to spell out the name of the chords, for example G7 is G B D F (because a dominant 7th chord is 1 3 5 b7 of G major scale)

I usually put the guide tones, meaning the very important notes of the chord which are the 3rd and 7th on the D and G strings. Then I experiment: I could leave out the fifth, put the root on the bass chord and choose what extension i want on the top strings.

Building and making your own shapes and voicings makes it much easier to remember them than to just memorize shapes from a chord book without understand the functions of each note


So at the start, learn how to name the notes of the chord you want to play (and don't worry about the notes that repeat. a minor is A C E and in practice you can repeat or not any note from that triad)
Last edited by SuperKid at Jul 21, 2014,
#9
Technically, I don't memorize chords. I memorize the intervals of each chord. I know all major chords are 1, 3, 5. All minors are 1, b3, 5. 7ths are 1, 3, 5, b7. And so on.
#10
^ Yeah. It actually takes less effort than memorising billions of chords. And I'm all about minimum effort for maximum return. EDIT: Ok to be fair, I'm all about minimum effort regardless of the return.

I mean, heck, I know very, very few chords (I learnt a couple of the most usual barre shapes for handiness). But I can work them out if I'm stuck.

As HotspurJr implied though, that doesn't mean you can't memorise the most usual chord shapes, too- even people who understand the theory probably know how to play an open G major chord or whatever, they aren't (well, I'm not ) working it out from first principles or anything like that.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#11
I think you should memorize at least the basic shapes and all inversions. Even if you know how they are built, you can't build them in real time unless you remember all the notes on the fretboard perfectly and all minor/major scales perfectly (which is possible but takes a lot of practice)
Last edited by Elintasokas at Jul 21, 2014,
#12
Quote by Dave_Mc
that doesn't mean you can't memorise the most usual chord shapes, too- even people who understand the theory probably know how to play an open G major chord or whatever, they aren't (well, I'm not ) working it out from first principles or anything like that.

well, yeah…. you don't want to have to calculate the theory in the middle of playing a song. Having all those chord shapes under your fingers, and their sounds in your ears comes in pretty handy.


Quote by tyawesome1
how do you memorize chord notes? a minor is a c e but the notes that you play appear a e a c e open a minor


It takes work. Look at some chords you know…. figure out what the notes are. For example, If you know how to construct say an Am chord, you'll know it's ACE…. now look at your chord shapes and ask yourself which note is this? A ? C? or E?

You could also learn the arpeggio shapes and learn to make the connection between that and the chords.

If you read music, and read chords often, that helps as well.

Quote by Elintasokas
I think you should memorize at least the basic shapes


+1 though I'd say start with a few and build as you go. Just like scales, you don't want to try and memorize a hundred different patterns….. learn a few…. use em….. learn some more.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 21, 2014,
#13
Quote by GuitarMunky
(a)well, yeah…. you don't want to have to calculate the theory in the middle of playing a song. Having all those chord shapes under your fingers, and their sounds in your ears comes in pretty handy.


(b)+1 though I'd say start with a few and build as you go. Just like scales, you don't want to try and memorize a hundred different patterns….. learn a few…. use em….. learn some more.


(a) yeah

(b) also yeah. barre chords are handy for getting a lot of chords for mimimal effort
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#14
Quote by Dave_Mc
(a) yeah

(b) also yeah. barre chords are handy for getting a lot of chords for mimimal effort



There also necessary if you want to play anything beyond the 1st few frets.
#15
yeah absolutely
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#16
Quote by tyawesome1
I know what chords use what noes maj 1 3 5 min 1 b3 5 Aug 1 #3 #5 and Dim 1 b3 b5 I need help memorizing how they appear G B D appears as G B D G B G

So you are asking about the basic chord shapes and how the notes appear on them? Learn the note names on your fretboard. 3 2 0 0 0 3 is G B D G B G. But you can voice it in many different ways. For example 3 5 5 4 3 3 (G D G B D G) is also G major. Same with x 10 12 12 12 10 (G D G B D).

So just learn the notes on the fretboard.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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#17
Quote by MaggaraMarine
....So just learn the notes on the fretboard.


+1. Good advice.

How did you do it? TS could learn from your experience.
Quote by AlanHB
It's the same as all other harmony. Surround yourself with skulls and candles if it helps.
#18
for me - learning the inversions of chords was the most valuable lesson in harmony..start with triads and then add the 7th tone for four note chords..

example - G triad GBD tones 1-3-5 on string set 654-EAD..G (6)B(5) D(4)-open)--ok your going to move each tone up to the next chord tone on the same string set..so G (1) moves to B on the same string B moves to D and D moves to G --the chord is now fingered on frets -7 5 5...follow this logic and find the next inversion on this set of strings...then...form the G triad on the next set of strings 5 4 3...and the next 432 and 321..so in total you have 12 close voiced chords in G major..this is also a good way to learn the notes in other positions

try this in as many keys as you want...in time you may discover many basic sounds of chord progressions using I-IV-V progressions all over the fretboard

hope this helps

play well

wolf
#19
Quote by Dave_Mc
^ Yeah. It actually takes less effort than memorising billions of chords. And I'm all about minimum effort for maximum return. EDIT: Ok to be fair, I'm all about minimum effort regardless of the return.

I mean, heck, I know very, very few chords (I learnt a couple of the most usual barre shapes for handiness). But I can work them out if I'm stuck.

As HotspurJr implied though, that doesn't mean you can't memorise the most usual chord shapes, too- even people who understand the theory probably know how to play an open G major chord or whatever, they aren't (well, I'm not ) working it out from first principles or anything like that.



Actually, in my experience as a player of nearly 30 years now, the two ideas are not necessarily mutually exclusive. It's possible to know both, and accomplish the same thing. It is quite possible learn the notes of every chord faster than just learning intervals. It's also possible to apply the ideas of intervals, simply by knowing the notes of every chord.

For example, let's say I never learned intervals. But I do learn that a C major triad is C E G. Now, I know Intervals. I know that C to E is a major third. And C to G is a 5th.

The conventional way of thinking would say, you learn the intervals first, then the formula and then start on C and apply that Major 3rd and perfect 5th and "discover" by observation and repetition that those are E and G notes. If I had followed that way of thinking I don't believe I would be able to instantly name the notes of every chord, today, without years and years of devoted practice through every permutation versus being able to accomplishing the same thing in a few weeks.

Best,

Sean
#20
Yeah possibly I'd never tell anyone there's a set way you have to do things, everyone's brain works slightly differently (or even a lot differently). I just like the "minimal effort" approach- for example, in physics I'd learn one formula but learn how to rearrange equations and (to my mind) this is a similar approach. But that's not to say it would necessarily work for everyone.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Jul 23, 2014,
#21
I also agreeing with learning the fret board (like I could tell you the 8th fret on the G string at standard tuning is an Eb without even looking at a guitar). Once you learn all the notes on the fretboard, things like inversions will be way easier.
#22
Quote by SquidNWhale
I also agreeing with learning the fret board (like I could tell you the 8th fret on the G string at standard tuning is an Eb without even looking at a guitar). Once you learn all the notes on the fretboard, things like inversions will be way easier.

+1. Good advice.

How did you do it? TS could learn from your experience.
Quote by AlanHB
It's the same as all other harmony. Surround yourself with skulls and candles if it helps.
#23
Best way to learn and memorize anything is to use it in real music.

Learn how to construct triads and 7th chords, and then get to playing some charts. Basic jazz charts contain all the information to gain a grasp of harmony in modern music.