#1
Does anyone out there use Reaper? if so, whats it like and is it easy for a complete Tech 'Tard like me to use? A run down of equipment needed would be cool too.
Cheers in advance..
#2
Lots of people use Reaper. It's the recommended software in the stickied thread which also details the equipment you need.
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#3
There's a pretty steep learning curve - the user manual is 400+ pages, alhtough you don't need to know ALL of it when starting.
Reaper is the software (DAW). You need lots of equipment to use it correctly - mics, audio interface, monitors, etc.
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#4
there really isnt a steep learning curve. you put up a new track, arm it and push record. i got a friend going in about 5 minutes. if youve ever used sound recorder, the basics of reaper arent much more than that.

there is a lot too it, but you can get the basics down first and then work on the advanced stuff as you learn the software.

to get started, all you really need is an interface. you plug your guitar into it (or a mic if you so choose) and thats about it. you can get fancy with monitors, but you dont need to when learning. to learn to mix, you will want monitors, but to start out it isnt a huge issue.
#5
I don't think I've ever read an instruction manual for a DAW before.
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#6
If you want to use the full abilities of Reaper, you do need to read the appropriate sections of the manual (or have someone show them to you).
If you just download and install the DAW, buy an interface and download/install the correct drivers, you still need to set your Preferences in Reaper - input, output and MIDI devices, for example.

If you don't want to use the full abilities, just arm a track, record, save. Oops, you got a mono track and wanted stereo. Oops, you wanted to add some reverb with the included VST ReaVerb, but you don't hear any reverb.
The manual tells you where to find (free) impulse files to use, where to install them and how to tell ReaVerb to find them in your computer files. The manual tells you how to set up your file system for easy access to songs, templates, and tracks, how to set up an instrument buss/group. These are just examples - Reaper allows you to do much more.

If all you want to do is hit a button to record, play it back to jam along, get a little digital recorder like a Zoom H2n.
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2012 Taylor 310ce
2011 Fender CD140SCE
Ibanez 12 string a/e
73 Epi 6830E
72 Fender Telecaster
Epi Dot Studio
Epi LP Jr
Chinese Strat clone
Washburn Mandolin
Luna 'tatoo' a/e uke
antique banjolin
Squire J bass
#7
I looked at tutorials online that cover the specifics of what I want to do, in the process it means I learn what all the tools I'm using actually do. If there was something VERY specific I wanted to know then I'd go to the manual.

Reading a whole manual is never a good idea, they're references, not novels.
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Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
Last edited by ChemicalFire at Jul 22, 2014,
#8
Cool, well at this point im just looking at pluggin in and recording a few jams. Down the track I could get a lot deeper into it - crawl before ya walk kinda vibe.
#9
Quote by ChemicalFire
I looked at tutorials online that cover the specifics of what I want to do, in the process it means I learn what all the tools I'm using actually do. If there was something VERY specific I wanted to know then I'd go to the manual.

Reading a whole manual is never a good idea, they're references, not novels.

Yeah, I only turn to the manual when I know very specifically what I'm trying to do, its way too easy to overwhelm yourself plowing through 400+ pages of any manual.
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#10
I've had reaper for about 60 days now and even though I don't have anything to compare it to, I really liked the results I got from it, the pricing is super cheap, the company seems really down to earth and focused on giving the customer a great experience. I'll probably upgrade to pro tools eventually, but on my budget for my purposes, I think reaper is great.
#11
Quote by ChemicalFire
I looked at tutorials online that cover the specifics of what I want to do, in the process it means I learn what all the tools I'm using actually do. If there was something VERY specific I wanted to know then I'd go to the manual.

Reading a whole manual is never a good idea, they're references, not novels.

I use the reaper forums. Bunch pof great guys there.

The customizability of reaper means it is even more powerful than any manual could explain. Especially if you SWS extensions.

Track in my sig was recorded and mixed in reaper start to finish. Never opened the manual once, but to each their own. I'm sure there would be a thing or two I'd learn from the manual, but the guys at reaper forums really cover a lot of options of how to do things, even stuff like new macros and tips on how to mix and stuff like that.