#1
Hello, guys.
I'd like to ask you a question.
(Excuse my english, I'm non-native and im not very fluent in it)

I've learned basic chords, and scales, and stuff
and I can play them very flexibely from memory.
And there are some songs that I can play completely.

But the problem is that I can't really figure out what chords
Do I have to use on my song.
When I'm singing a melody, which is very simple and easy,
I don't really know which chord would be in harmony with
that melody.

For folk music, or pop music, I can listen to the record and
Figure out the chords and stuff
But how do I find suitable chords for my singing?
What should I learn?

Again, I'm really sorry for my english.
Last edited by Joeasdd1 at Jul 21, 2014,
#2
You would probably benefit by taking a basic Music Theory class, where you learn about scales, how the scale affects the sound, basics of harmony, etc.
Other than that, for your own songwriting, just keep trying chords until you hit the one tha tmakes you say 'Yeah! that's the one!'
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#3
first of all be tension free!! chill because ur playing a musical instrument. okay here is the deal. evey chord is associated with a note, dat you should be able to sense it. now humming in the same pitch, this is important, by this you will understand the pitch of the chord...playing guitar for a song is all about matching the pitches.
#4
You could taking the opposite approach: create a chord progression and then build a melody over top of those chords. This way, you already have the notes from the chords in your ear when you're making your melody. Good luck!
#5
You need to learn the I, IV, & V chords in a number of major keys. These are the chords built on the 1st (tonic), 4th (sub dominant), & 5th (dominant) note of every major key.

A great many popular songs, use only these 3 chords.

In the key of C major, these chords would be C, F, G

In G major, G, C, D.

Anyway, when you're picking out music by ear, some trial and error will be necessary.

In a process of elimination, to determine if a song is in C or G, listen for the differential chord. If you hear an F, the song is most likely in C. When the D chord is present, the key is often G.

Most songs end on the tonic or "I" chord, which is another useful clue to find your key.

A chord is formed on each and every note of the major scale. Some are major, some minor, and one is diminished (7th).

Every major scale follows this pattern, 1 major, 2 minor, 3 minor, 4 major, 5 major, 6 minor, 7. So for C major, the chords would be C, Bm, Dm, F, G, Am, B dim

Here's a simple song to get you started, it uses the I, IV, V, chords, with a vi minor thrown in here and there.

Noe of this is set in stone. You have to experiment. Blues often follows different rules and uses all V7 chords. Fleetwood Mac will record an entire album with 2 chord songs. (Well, I' m joking a bit about that). It's just intended to give you a beginning look at basic key and song structure,

BTW, "Brown Eyed Girl", is always a huge hit at parties.

http://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/v/van_morrison/brown_eyed_girl_ver3_crd.htmhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9AsvlJSU6qE