#1
Yeah I know that sounds like something else but allow me to explain

I had come back from guitar center with some new nylon strings. i was looking forward to restring the guitar a friend of mine gave me before he moved back to columbia. While restringing the guitar i noticed that the fourth string was didn't sound right. I don't mean out of tune right, i mean something was up against it right. so i checked the neck and found what the problem was.

it turns out the problem was with one of the filings in the nut. Specifically the filing in where the fourth string was. Apparently, the filing was lower than the other 5 and caused the fourth string to touch the first fret.

I would like to fix this problem but i am not sure how. I thought about putting some sort of plastic through it to level it out but i don't know.

Anyone care to throw in their two cents?
#2
A small piece of thin card or paper in the slot under the string sometimes works but the best way to solve the problem is either to replace the nut or place a thin shim under the existing nut and deepen the other slots.

When you fret each string at the 3rd fret there should be just a very small gap between the bottom of the string and the top of the 1st fret - just enough to slide in a thin piece of paper.
#3
Here's how I do it:

Clean the bottom of the slot a little with fine abrasive paper.

Get some cotton (not synthetic) thread and lay a few strands neatly side by side in the bottom of the slot to make a single layer.

Secure the thread ends taughtly in the slot with tape or poster putty on the fretboard and head stock.

Apply superglue carefully to the threads in the slot with a toothpick until they are just flooded and the glue has wicked a little way along the threads. Don't overdo it!

When the glue is dry, cut the threads off flush with the nut with a sharp knife.

If that isn't enough, repeat, adding another layer of threads. If you have to add a lot of threads, you might need to reshape the bottom of the slot with a needle file, but it should be necessary with a couple of layers.

Dead easy, invisible if you use white cotton, and very durable - I've had some now holding up for about 10 years.
#5
Standard stuff, that. I use bone dust... But then I usually have a lot of chunks of bone around from.... Making nuts.
Either works... You just have to carefully angle the resulting repair. If you don't have a set of dedicated nut files... Sometimes a hacksaw blade will work for the upper strings.
Or... You can obtain a cute little item from the hardware store called a "torch tip cleaner". It's a bunch of tiny little round wire-gauge files that just happen to be the right size for most all guitar strings... Only a few bucks.
#6
Quote by Bikewer
Standard stuff, that. I use bone dust... But then I usually have a lot of chunks of bone around from.... Making nuts.
Either works... You just have to carefully angle the resulting repair. If you don't have a set of dedicated nut files... Sometimes a hacksaw blade will work for the upper strings.
Or... You can obtain a cute little item from the hardware store called a "torch tip cleaner". It's a bunch of tiny little round wire-gauge files that just happen to be the right size for most all guitar strings... Only a few bucks.


Interesting you should mention the torch tip cleaners. I recall that the first time I saw it suggested was by Bob Dorgan on RMMGA - usenet, it would be more than a decade ago. He is a welder by trade, and he might might be the originator.

I've been using them for years, I make a little bowsaw thingie for the thin ones out of brazing rod to keep them taut.

The bone dust and baking soda methods work fine, but you need to recut the nut slot. You don't with my method - my music store mate has adopted it in his repair shop because it is fast, simple and sets hard enough for good acoustic contact.
#8
Quote by Nanobotter
nut in a nutshell.

Use liquid super glue with baking soda.


What's the reason for baking soda? Just to make it white?
#9
Quote by rohash
What's the reason for baking soda? Just to make it white?

Just top make a paste. Thin super glue takes forever to build up depth. Although I think bone dust would have more snob appeal....

You might get away with medium thick cyano-acrylate and a spritz of accelerator.

You have to be careful with the accelerant though, builds up a ton of heat.