#1
Recently started gigging and I have collected a few pedals over the years and like many i'm looking into making a pedal board. The only thing is I have had some problems with my feet over the years and i'm not the best at clicking the pedals by foot.

Does anyone here put there pedals on top of there amp or something of the sort? Are there any options that can make things a little more convenient for me? Sorry if this is a dumb question guys but the usual easier way of doing it by foot might not be the best for me.
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#2
what specifically do you find difficult about switching with your feet?

Unless you have some sort of disability, or you're not actually playing for large parts of your songs, I would still reccomend powering through an uncomfortable process and learning to switch with your feet.
#3
Hmmm unless you have your own sound guy to trigger those effects I don't see how it would be possible.

Mostly because your hands are probably occupied already by playing the song. For that very reason everything is designed to be used by foot.

If you could manage to stick 3 or 4 buttons (or incorporate those and plug midi) on your guitar, maybe you could use your fingers to press the buttons and change effects.


Edit: I picture these switch like on a Fender Jaguar. And right beside your guitar jack, insert a midi jack.
Last edited by Taz9 at Jul 23, 2014,
#4
One option would be to use a multi effect pedal with presets so that the footswitching could be kept to a minimum.

Another would be to take pedals like delay/reverb and set them subtle enough so that they do their job, but they can still stay on all the time. And set your overdrive as always on and use your volume knob on your guitar to clean it up.
Originally posted by primusfan
When you crank up the gain to 10 and switch to the lead channel, it actually sounds like you are unjustifiably bombing an innocent foreign land.


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#5
You can set up a guitar to do MIDI switching (rotary switch) or have a switching pad attached to the guitar.
#6
What about getting a guitar like the Kay Effector that has built in effects?

(There are probably others, but that's the one I can think of off the top of my head)
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#7
What is it about switching with your feet you find difficult?

Need to know that before offering advise really
#8
Get a music stand, or something like one, and velcro your pedals to it. Assuming you only have a few pedals.

You might have to put some weight at the base, so it doesn't fall over. Cable tie your cables so there isn't a mess and voila.

Dave Navarro has one of his delays on a stand.
#9
I think one of the huge difficulties you're going to encounter is that most pedals take a significant amount of pressure to switch. (Hence the term "STOMP" in stompbox...)

Since you can't use your feet and you're going to need the switching to be as smooth as possible due to limited availability of your hands, getting a tech to change out the switches for units designed to be operated by hand seems a logical first step. A programmable pedal looper with soft-touch switches might be something to consider.

Also, for you jokers saying "power through it, do it with your feet", you need to stop. You don't have a clue about the TS's situation, nor is it any of your business. He asked a specific question, how about we work on answering it?
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
Last edited by Arby911 at Jul 23, 2014,
#10
Quote by LivinJoke84
What is it about switching with your feet you find difficult?

Need to know that before offering advise really


No, you don't need to know. There are any number of conditions including diabetes induced neuropathy that can make working with your feet impossible. Assume it's a disability and let it go at that, and get busy answering the question.
#11
Quote by dspellman
No, you don't need to know. There are any number of conditions including diabetes induced neuropathy that can make working with your feet impossible. Assume it's a disability and let it go at that, and get busy answering the question.


There are many different levels of disability though. He might have trouble with a "click" style footswitch whereas a soft touch footswitch wouldnt be an issue. If that was the case people could recommend soft footswitch pedals.

But if he cant use his feet at all then its a different issue.

So depending on what the problem is (obviously dont need intimate details) would depend on what advise to give

Anyway, if its the latter:-

One way to do it is just have someone at the side of the stage do it for you, or maybe another member of the band?
#12
No, seriously -- MIDI switching is probably your go-to solution. The only question will be the nature of the switches you use. Guitarists have long used MIDI to change multiple stomp boxes at once (no one tap dances THAT fast), and it allows them to keep the actual boxes in their backline, often in rack shelves. http://www.thegigrig.com/ is a typical outfit that will help you set up complicated FX switching.

But even they use stomp switch setups. They may have an idea for you, but I'm thinking that the solution could be as easy as stacked and push-pull switching (check out the Carvin SH575 for an example of that):



Another option is something like the controller that came with the old Zoom 9002 (maybe 3" x 1"). The 9002 itself threaded onto your guitar strap, and this controller used a mini-phone jack to plug in. The controller itself velcroed onto your guitar. This, or a membrane-type switching setup, would handle bank and channel switching quickly and easily.

#13
Quote by Arby911


Also, for you jokers saying "power through it, do it with your feet", you need to stop. You don't have a clue about the TS's situation, nor is it any of your business. He asked a specific question, how about we work on answering it?



Quote by dspellman
No, you don't need to know. There are any number of conditions including diabetes induced neuropathy that can make working with your feet impossible. Assume it's a disability and let it go at that, and get busy answering the question.


are you guys serious? He's the one asking for help. We're the ones trying to get more information to help him in his specific situation. If he tells us he has a disability and how it affects him, we'll work from there and find alternate solutions but we really can't assume anything, we'd be operating in the dark and might be offering counterproductive advice that would do him more damage in the long term.

It's not a question of judging or being snoops but getting information necessary to the comprehension of the problem

If one of your guitar students told you he didn't want to learn bar chords because they hurt his hands, would you instantly accept that maybe he's got a weird disease and reccommend alternate tunings to simplify his life so he'd never need to do a bar chord or simply get him to try it the hard way for a bit so you can get more information about the specific problem.


If you want me to answer the question based ONLY on the info in the first post, my answer is:

"Neither I, nor anyone here can help you in an efficient way unless you post more information about the details of your problem"
#14
What is it that you have trouble with when trying to turn them on by foot? Do you accidentally hit the wrong pedal, miss it completely?
#15
Quote by flexiblemile
are you guys serious? He's the one asking for help. We're the ones trying to get more information to help him in his specific situation. If he tells us he has a disability and how it affects him, we'll work from there and find alternate solutions but we really can't assume anything, we'd be operating in the dark and might be offering counterproductive advice that would do him more damage in the long term.

It's not a question of judging or being snoops but getting information necessary to the comprehension of the problem

If one of your guitar students told you he didn't want to learn bar chords because they hurt his hands, would you instantly accept that maybe he's got a weird disease and reccommend alternate tunings to simplify his life so he'd never need to do a bar chord or simply get him to try it the hard way for a bit so you can get more information about the specific problem.


If you want me to answer the question based ONLY on the info in the first post, my answer is:

"Neither I, nor anyone here can help you in an efficient way unless you post more information about the details of your problem"


Yeah, we're serious, you're being a knob. Assume, as per the OP, that he CAN'T, WON'T or CHOOSES NOT TO use his feet and respond accordingly. It's really not that difficult...

If we do find out differently later, revise as necessary.

He asked what time it was, not how to build a watch.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
Last edited by Arby911 at Jul 23, 2014,
#16
Thanks for all the help guys and I'm not sure why there is conflict in this thread I'm only asking if there is an alternative to using your feet....

I have had operations on both of my feet and they have caused me problems over the years. I'm not 100% incapable of using a stompbox obviously I can stand on stage for hours but my feet are a bit clumsy I'm just trying my best to not trip over a cord or something and look like an idiot on stage. If there is something I can get to make things easier for me (like this midi control on my guitar) im gonna check it out. If there is absolutely no other way I will keep my effects to a minimum and give it a try. I would just be nice to be able to focus on my guitar solo coming up rather than struggle with my cursed feet on a pedal.
Jackson DK2
1962 Fender Esquire
PEAVEY JSX 212
PEAVEY 6505+ 112
#17
Thank you for the info.

Would you say that the problem comes more from the spaghetti of wires on stage or the physical act of pressing on a pedal?

Can you give us a rundown of all the gear (guitars, amps, pedals etc) that you're using now?

On average, do you use many differents effects at the same time? Also once they're set up, do you leave them "as is" for the whole song or do you need to change in the middle?

How much money (if any) would you be willing to spend on fixing this issue?
#18
As dspellman noted, a good midi controllable setup would work well, since there are plenty of midi controllers designed for hand operation. That's probably your most likely 'off the shelf' solution.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#19
Quote by Arby911
Yeah, we're serious, you're being a knob. Assume, as per the OP, that he CAN'T, WON'T or CHOOSES NOT TO use his feet and respond accordingly. It's really not that difficult...

If we do find out differently later, revise as necessary.

He asked what time it was, not how to build a watch.



you have been reported. Your behavior is aggressive and unacceptable.
#20
Quote by flexiblemile

Would you say that the problem comes more from the spaghetti of wires on stage or the physical act of pressing on a pedal?










Quote by flexiblemile
you have been reported. Your behavior is aggressive and unacceptable.



Oh No!!
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
Last edited by Arby911 at Jul 23, 2014,
#21
Well right now I don't use any effects at all. This is my first band and I've only played 3 gigs.

I have the gear in my sig plus some other stuff suited for Country music (Tele,Roland Jazz Chorus)

As for pedals I don't have a huge selection ether as I said I'm just looking in to the whole pedal board thing now this is all new to me. Some pedals I've just collected over the years and most likely won't need and others like the noise gate would just be left on I guess.

Boss NS2
Tube Screamer TS9
Boss Mega Distortion MD-2
Arion compressor
Ibanez CS9 Stereo Chorus
Boss Phaser PH-1r
Boss Metal Zone MT-2

As it stands right now it's not the end of the world if I don't use anything I'm just thinking the future it would be nice to be able to put some character into a solo.

Pretty much I just wanted to know if there are options for me before I go fullbore on this pedal board idea.

Quote by Arby911
As dspellman noted, a good midi controllable setup would work well, since there are plenty of midi controllers designed for hand operation. That's probably your most likely 'off the shelf' solution.


Ok cool thanks for the help.

Quote by dspellman
No, seriously -- MIDI switching is probably your go-to solution. The only question will be the nature of the switches you use. Guitarists have long used MIDI to change multiple stomp boxes at once (no one tap dances THAT fast), and it allows them to keep the actual boxes in their backline, often in rack shelves. http://www.thegigrig.com/ is a typical outfit that will help you set up complicated FX switching.


Thanks for taking time to help me out dspellman
Jackson DK2
1962 Fender Esquire
PEAVEY JSX 212
PEAVEY 6505+ 112
Last edited by UFC on VHS at Jul 23, 2014,
#22
How bout a Gibson Firebird X? It already has fx built into the actual guitar. And robot tuners, which I find fascinating.
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#23
OK, I'm just brainstorming here, but as I see it, a switch is a switch. If you understand electronics, you can open up the pedal, take the on and off wires from the switch and replace them with very long ones that have maybe a toggle switch in the circuit instead of the stomp type. I'm sure you would have to drill holes in the case to run the new wires , but they could be shrink wrapped to make it really nice looking, and then the switch could be mounted on a plate of some type that could fit up on a mike stand or drum cymbal standbor something to get itbto a comfortable height for you. When all of your pedals are modified with long switch circuits the entire bundle could be held together by larger shrink tube and wire tied a few places going up the stand while you perform, then you could just snip the ties and roll the snake and plate with switches together with the pedals for easy transport. If doing this I would mount pedals to a pedal board to keep everything in order when moving.

I helped a friend take the ignition key switch off his motorcycle and mounted a toggle switch and push button starter switch on the battery box for a cleaner look on top of his forks. Back to the subject, a switch is a switch, with wire, solder, and a little imagination you could use any switch and mount it anywhere that would make it easier for your needs. Hope this rambling helps. Good luck man.
#24
This is just an idea. Might not be ideal, but I got it while reading your additional information.

If you got yourself a pretty large board and spaced the pedals really far from each other, you would have a lot of room for your foot to go. So then when you needed to turn a pedal on, you could carefully walk over to it and hit the switch without fear of hitting anything else. And if your patch cables are either threaded under the board or taped down, there will be no way to trip. Just something to think about.
Originally posted by primusfan
When you crank up the gain to 10 and switch to the lead channel, it actually sounds like you are unjustifiably bombing an innocent foreign land.


╠═══════╬═══════╣
τλε τρπ βπστλεπλσσδ
╠═══════╬═══════╣
#25
Either a midi switch to control the pedals or an FX processor such as a line 6 M13 or lower. You can even use an HD for on board effects.

Some stomp box switches have 2 contacts, some have 4 and some have 6. The $$ required if he has to pay someone to do that isn't worth it. Digital effects like the M class are near on par to pedals, esp during live situations. (Not mention resale value takes a hit if you can even sell it)

If it was me I'd be going the midi route.


I can't believe the guy got reported for using caps. What a tard and **** wad.
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