#1
I have a pretty simple question regarding practicing scales. Do you guys repeat the top note when coming back down the scale? Or do you only play each note once when playing scales. I never considered repeating the top note a problem because I end up on a metronome click back at the root note if I repeat the top note and i'm playing regular 8th or 16th notes. Then recently I was looking at online videos to review beginner material and see if I had any gaps in my guitar knowledge (hehe) and I found a lot of people who never repeat the top note when playing scales. Is it different for triplets too? Is it personal preference? I never had a teacher so I never found it odd before but this little thing is really bugging the heck out of me.
#2
Scale notes don't have a sequential order. They're notes and that's all. You can play them any way you want. Sounds to me like you have a serious misunderstanding of what scales are for. Scales aren't designed for practicing 32nd notes up and down a fixed shape. Most people cringe in fact when someone does that.
Last edited by vayne92 at Jul 23, 2014,
#3
Thanks for your answer. I totally get what you mean, but practicing scales helps me build up finger strength and speed, as well as learning theory and practicing technique so yes, I do practice scales up and down, although most of my time playing guitar is not doing that, I assure you.
Last edited by yamahaducky8910 at Jul 23, 2014,
#4
Please, stop what you are doing there. No one cares about your speed, exept guitarists, learn to play the scale, speak through it, add notes to it, express yourself. If you believe that going up and down a scale makes you a musician or a guitarist then you are wrong. Stop copying all those shitty ass youtube guitarists. Music is not scales up and down, music is expression. All I see this days in people 's solos is "look how fast I can play this scale" or "look at this new technique I learnt". Make music out of your guitar, learn to speak through it and leave everything else behind. I haven 't listen to guitarists that cant sweep pick, cant play lighting fast, but what the play expresses them, and tha I like.
#5
Frankly, I don't care much for speed either. I'm not impressed one bit by guitarists that can play lightning fast but don't have an ounce of musicality behind it. This is not what I'm aspiring to at all. I just asked the simple question of whether I should repeat the top note when I go down a scale. How else am I supposed to learn a scale and learn how to use it if I never practice the scale? Please stop twisting my words.

Just to rephrase again, I agree with everything you said, and I understand music is more than playing fast, which I can't do anyways, and I'm NOT trying to do THROUGH scales. I'm learning scales and I wonder how they are played up and down. That is all.
Last edited by yamahaducky8910 at Jul 23, 2014,
#6
I see what you're saying, and honestly I'm not sure why these comments are so harsh, I have been playing guitar for quite a while and have also played in orchestra, and running up and down scales for practice is a normal thing to do. And I only play the top note once while playing the scale, but it doesn't really make a difference how many times you play it.
Last edited by telemaster16 at Jul 23, 2014,
#7
Yeah I've been in my school's orchestra too, along with playing piano for a good amount of years. I thought scales were just a part of a daily routine thing to do but maybe that was just all my classical training talking. Who knew it would be so rejected here. Thanks for answering. I'll just practice both so I can get different up and down picks on different notes. Thanks again.
#8
Quote by yamahaducky8910
I have a pretty simple question regarding practicing scales. Do you guys repeat the top note when coming back down the scale? Or do you only play each note once when playing scales. I never considered repeating the top note a problem because I end up on a metronome click back at the root note if I repeat the top note and i'm playing regular 8th or 16th notes. Then recently I was looking at online videos to review beginner material and see if I had any gaps in my guitar knowledge (hehe) and I found a lot of people who never repeat the top note when playing scales. Is it different for triplets too? Is it personal preference? I never had a teacher so I never found it odd before but this little thing is really bugging the heck out of me.


normally don't repeat the top note.

IIRC from piano lessons at the very start you repeated the top note but then once you got further along that was frowned upon. I might well be misremembering, though.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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#9
Quote by Dave_Mc
normally don't repeat the top note.

IIRC from piano lessons at the very start you repeated the top note but then once you got further along that was frowned upon. I might well be misremembering, though.

Personally, I always repeat the top note, though I do it mostly out of habit even if it is frowned upon. I think it pretty much comes down to personal taste. If you feel the need to repeat the top note, then repeat the top note. There's not any rules (as far as I know) for how to properly practice a scale. Practicing both ways sure can't hurt though, especially when alternate picking and all.
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#10
Quote by Dave_Mc
normally don't repeat the top note.

IIRC from piano lessons at the very start you repeated the top note but then once you got further along that was frowned upon. I might well be misremembering, though.
That said, a diatonic scales has 8 notes. If you don't repeat the top note, and still count in 4/4 time, wouldn't that be a hemiola? At least to the extent you'd need a 1/4 note rest to align the timing when playing only 7 notes on the way down. (Assuming an even time signature, of course).

In any case, I think everyone should practice scales with a plan, particularly beginners. By this I mean, varying the key, naming the notes on the fret board as you play, and obviously changing position.

Still in all, there are harder thing to perfect in the way of technique, than running up and down scales.

Hammer ons, pull offs, slides, vibrato, changing position, I feel are all worth working into one's practice routine.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 23, 2014,
#11
Thanks for the answers everyone. Just confirming that there's no set "right" way to play scales again. I think I'll practice both ways with alternate picking just for practice sakes. And Captaincranky, the reason you mentioned is why I usually play scales and always repeat the top note because with 8 notes up and down, I get to a perfect metronome click when coming back to the root note, or beginning of the scale. I'm also aware that scales are not all that there is to practice. I also practice hammer ons and pull offs.... consequentially also with scales atm and sliding from different positions. I also apply all this stuff when learning random new songs too so I'm not just drilling scales the entire time I play guitar, as previous posters had thought.
#12
Quote by yamahaducky8910
...[ ]...I'm not just drilling scales the entire time I play guitar, as previous posters had thought.
Some of the answers you got were Pavlovian in nature. Ring the bell, and people accuse you of wanking on scales.

Your OP was poorly phrased, and so destined to incur some of the responses you received.

No harm, no foul though, welcome to UG.
#13
Quote by Captaincranky
Some of the answers you got were Pavlovian in nature. Ring the bell, and people accuse you of wanking on scales.

Your OP was poorly phrased, and so destined to incur some of the responses you received.

No harm, no foul though, welcome to UG.



Haha thanks. I totally get where they are coming from. I haven't been in an english-speaking country for the past few years so my english is bound to get worse without practice. I'm sorry that I wasn't clear in my original post.
Last edited by yamahaducky8910 at Jul 24, 2014,
#14
If you want some decent practice out of it, other than the usual, play them thinking in irregular numbers. Think 7 notes, or 13, that way you can play the same thing in an incredibly large amount of different ways. Because the beat keeps shifting over the same pattern.
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#15
When you practice scales you should be doing them up and down the entire neck. They aren't worth much if you only practice them in root position. The "knowledge" part of scales should be pretty straightforward once you learn them. After that the idea is to make key/scale part of how you visualize the instrument, and that requires practicing the location of the notes all over.

Once you hack through figuring it out, scales are just like a 15 minute workout you can do to warm up. Definitely one of the easier things you can do with a large, long term payoff in your playing.
#16
Quote by SexyBeast810
Personally, I always repeat the top note, though I do it mostly out of habit even if it is frowned upon. I think it pretty much comes down to personal taste. If you feel the need to repeat the top note, then repeat the top note. There's not any rules (as far as I know) for how to properly practice a scale. Practicing both ways sure can't hurt though, especially when alternate picking and all.


I couldn't care less, I have no time for pointless rules, but I think if you're doing academic exams where scales are a part of that, you're normally expected not to repeat the top note. Don't quote me on that, though.

Quote by Captaincranky
That said, a diatonic scales has 8 notes. If you don't repeat the top note, and still count in 4/4 time, wouldn't that be a hemiola? At least to the extent you'd need a 1/4 note rest to align the timing when playing only 7 notes on the way down. (Assuming an even time signature, of course).

In any case, I think everyone should practice scales with a plan, particularly beginners. By this I mean, varying the key, naming the notes on the fret board as you play, and obviously changing position.

Still in all, there are harder thing to perfect in the way of technique, than running up and down scales.

Hammer ons, pull offs, slides, vibrato, changing position, I feel are all worth working into one's practice routine.


you just hold the last note for the required time.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#17
Quote by Captaincranky
That said, a diatonic scales has 8 notes. If you don't repeat the top note, and still count in 4/4 time, wouldn't that be a hemiola? At least to the extent you'd need a 1/4 note rest to align the timing when playing only 7 notes on the way down. (Assuming an even time signature, of course).
Quote by Dave_Mc
...[ ].....you just hold the last note for the required time.
I didn't actually need that explained to me, but thanks for the heads up.

FWIW, the syntax of ther OP was absolutely perfect, at least if you're trolling.

Our TS claims it's because he hasn't been in an English speaking country for many years.

The best thing I can think to do, is take him at his word. Thread resolved.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 24, 2014,
#18
haha no worries
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?