#1
What do you guys think about this. Obviously you need great skills to be a great player but I myself find that on certain guitars the tone gives me a sort of inspiration and I start playing things/ doing things I wouldn't normally do. Ive had this experience with a few different guitars. They just feel so good to play that you start playing better than you normally would. I know most people will probably say this is ridiculous, but I wanted to see if anyone had any similar experiences.
#2
I would have to agree and have had similar experience. You need to have a comfortable instrument and a tone + any effects you like that really suits you to feel inspired to practice.
#3
Its not ridiculous. A well made and set up guitar is easier to play...period. I have a Suhr that almost plays itself, and its so intuitive for me to play because the strings feel they are exactly where they should be and the neck plays almost effortlessly. Several of my Reverends are that way as well.

Best,

Sean
#4
I play better when I don't feel like I'm fighting the instrument.
#6
Yes it can make a difference.Ive seen myself struggle with a riff on one guitar and then nail it on another guitar.
#7
Of course it can.
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#8
I would argue that decent equipment is the most important thing when trying to get better. Playing on a "bad" guitar just isn't fun.
#9
The guitar is a tool. Even the best hammer won't make a novice into a master craftsman, but an uncomfortable, shoddy one won't help them get better.
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#10
Quote by Vlasco
I play better when I don't feel like I'm fighting the instrument.


I play better when I feel like I am fighting the instrument. Guitars with really low action and slinky as **** strings bore me. It feels like I'm not actually doing anything. My favourite guitars I've played so far were my LPJ and an ES-33

(edit: es-335)
Last edited by Himynameisben95 at Jul 25, 2014,
#12
I almost quit playing because my guitar was heavy and crappy and after playing it for 2 years it just wasn't fun anymore and I wasn't getting any better. I was offered a great deal on a Parker Pm-20 Pro so I bought it and within hours of playing I was breaking through plateaus and really enjoying playing again.
#13
Quote by Himynameisben95
I play better when I feel like I am fighting the instrument. Guitars with really low action and slinky as **** strings bore me. It feels like I'm not actually doing anything. My favourite guitars I've played so far were my LPJ and an ES-33

(edit: es-335)

This is why the definition of a 'good' guitar cannot be defined (especially when it comes to Gibson). I've hated lots of technically great guitars and I've loved lots of techncally lower spec guitars.

My current main guitar is an LP Studio, one of the cheapest in the Studio range, yet I chose it after trying 100s of guitars, some of which cost 4 times the amount I spent. It had the X factor that other (often more expensive guitars) lacked.

There's a conversation going on in another thread about how a lot of Schecter's guitars just feel sterile, and there you're talking about high spec guitars that somepeople would rate as among the best.

There's no such thing as a 'good' guitar. There is such a thing as the 'right' guitar.

When you find that right guitar, it will make you want to play it more, and it will bring the best out of you.
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Last edited by GaryBillington at Jul 25, 2014,
#14
Quote by GaryBillington
There's no such thing as a 'good' guitar. There is such a thing as the 'right' guitar.

^Agreed. I like my MIM squier given to me by my uncle more than a Fender strat my friend has. That said, there're definitely bad guitars. Although a great guitar player can make most guitars sing anyway but the right guitar will feel nicer to you and of course you'll feel more motivated.
#15
Quote by Himynameisben95
I play better when I feel like I am fighting the instrument. Guitars with really low action and slinky as **** strings bore me. It feels like I'm not actually doing anything. My favourite guitars I've played so far were my LPJ and an ES-33

(edit: es-335)


That's pretty cool
#16
Quote by GaryBillington


There's no such thing as a 'good' guitar. There is such a thing as the 'right' guitar.


I couldn't agree more. A while ago I had two guitars, a very simple Shelter stratocaster and a Epiphone flying V. I paid a lot more on the Epiphone (more than twice the amount), however I could get a much better sound and play a lot better on the Shelter. Sadly, due to some financial trouble, I had to sell both. Never again I found a guitar I felt so comfortable with, specially within the same price range.
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#17
One thing about a better guitar is that takes away the excuses. When you are learning to play and you think your guitar is not a decent guitar it becomes a great excuse as to why you can't learn as fast as others. It nonsense of course because a great guitar player can make a Fender Bullet Strat sound like a great guitar and a clasic 59 Les Paul Burst can sound like crap in the hands of someone who doesn't play well. But I think you are right. When the guitar feels good to you and has the tone you are looking for, you play longer and longer and that just natually leads to playing better.
#18
To me the acutal skills/chops are the most important thing and guitars second.

It was not always like that. Back in the early '90s I went through a couple of guitars quickly and as far as playing better I guess I did develop somehow as I played a lot and learned too. Bought tab books and magazines as well.

My first guitar was a Applause Strat and the inspiration was a boy from the former school I went to who had a white one + the price was fair enough.

Then I got into different shapes Like V, Explorer, Les Paul and ESP super strat (KHII). I guess trying to get some experience how they were. They looked cool when my favorite artist played them. Anyway had them all but due to artist change somewhat and the offer on hand it got to single coil Strat build.

Then it got to single coil Strat only for a while and then things had to change so the 5500$ Jackson RR that was really the holy grail. Can we do this? YES! The universe said so I went for it.

My single coil Strat has always been a bit of a fight as it is not clear to hide your weak skills anywhere so it will come out of the amp pretty loud and clear.

My Jackson always feels right even from day 1 back in 1997 but my strat is more fun to practise on and it sounds pretty good too.
#19
Absolutely, as everyone else has been saying.

A great guitar won't make you better than you are, but it will make you as good as you can possibly be, and conversely a bad guitar can make you seem worse than you really are.

The amp (and cab/speakers) is very important too, similar thing with that.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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#20
Quote by hanginout
What do you guys think about this. Obviously you need great skills to be a great player but I myself find that on certain guitars the tone gives me a sort of inspiration and I start playing things/ doing things I wouldn't normally do. Ive had this experience with a few different guitars. They just feel so good to play that you start playing better than you normally would. I know most people will probably say this is ridiculous, but I wanted to see if anyone had any similar experiences.


I would say yes and no.

A better guitar is probably easier to play in a lot of ways, but it's also probably more responsive to whatever you're doing.

(I say probably because there are all sorts of definitions of "good" guitars).

That is to say, you might be able to get away with some sloppiness in your technique on a worse guitar, because the guitar isn't capturing every nuance of your playing that well anyway. But on a better guitar, all of a sudden you can hear every inconsistency.
#21
Quote by HotspurJr
I would say yes and no.

A better guitar is probably easier to play in a lot of ways, but it's also probably more responsive to whatever you're doing.

(I say probably because there are all sorts of definitions of "good" guitars).

That is to say, you might be able to get away with some sloppiness in your technique on a worse guitar, because the guitar isn't capturing every nuance of your playing that well anyway. But on a better guitar, all of a sudden you can hear every inconsistency.

Yeah I kind of disagree. ^

A good guitar is one that sounds good, and feels good to play.

So whatever you play the sound on the better guitar is just better because the instrument itself sounds better. Even the mistakes sound better.

And because it feels good to play you are less likely to make the same number of technical errors that you would make on a crap guitar.

With a bad guitar even when you do it right it can sound wrong. - Makes learning on a crappy instrument pretty tough. I guess you could say that it is harder to identify if a particular crappy sound is a result of the crappy guitar or poor playing and so it can hide your mistakes in that way. But on a good guitar even your mistakes sound better.

I think also the great sound is very encouraging and gives more positive feedback in your mind so you end up feeling better about playing and improve.

I remember for a long time playing an Ibanez acoustic guitar. Pretty run of the mill acoustic guitar, not expensive but not a complete piece of crap either. Having come from playing a classical guitar the strings were tough and it was hard to play. Over time I got better an felt pretty comfortable on it. I picked up another guys guitar, a Washburn. It came to be just how I felt and expected acoustic guitars to sound.

I then played a guys Martin guitar, and this was a decent one too. I found out later he had spent over $5000 on it. But he had it at a party (to which I was asked to bring my guitar but declined because I didn't want it to get damaged -haha). But playing on this thing was like silk. The only way I could describe it is as though the guitar were playing itself. (I think someone else here said that in one of their posts too). Everything I did felt soo good, it was like I couldn't do anything wrong. The difference between that instrument and anything I have played before (or since) was amazing.

Whenever someone comes to me and says they want to learn, or that they want their kids to learn and ask what kind of guitar they should get. I spend a long time talking to them about making a decent investment in a reasonable quality instrument. One of the biggest impediments to learning an instrument is learning on a piece of shit instrument.
Si
#22
Quote by Dave_Mc
Absolutely, as everyone else has been saying.

A great guitar won't make you better than you are, but it will make you as good as you can possibly be, and conversely a bad guitar can make you seem worse than you really are.

The amp (and cab/speakers) is very important too, similar thing with that.

This.

Also, if you have a bad guitar, you don't want to play it because it doesn't feel good to play. Having a good guitar can inspire you and make you want to play more because it feels so good to play (and sounds so good). And yeah, the same can be said about amps. A good tone will make you want to play more. If your amp sounds bad, you don't want to play.
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#23
^ Yeah, also a good point.

Also worth bearing in mind that a good guitar which is set up badly won't play well either.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#24
Quote by 20Tigers


I think also the great sound is very encouraging and gives more positive feedback in your mind so you end up feeling better about playing and improve.

(snip)

Whenever someone comes to me and says they want to learn, or that they want their kids to learn and ask what kind of guitar they should get. I spend a long time talking to them about making a decent investment in a reasonable quality instrument. One of the biggest impediments to learning an instrument is learning on a piece of shit instrument.


Oh, I largely agree.

But, for example, a lot of expensive guitars have better dynamics than cheaper guitars. On the cheapie, everything sounds about the same volume. You switch to a more dynamic guitar, and you suddenly hear that you're not playing consistently volume-wise.

In the long run, that's great. It'll help you get better control of your dynamics. I would never argue for getting a cheaper guitar because it doesn't show you your flaws in the same way. But when you sit down with one after playing a cheapie you might be surprised at what you hear. "Oh, I didn't know I was doing that. I better work on it."
#25
Quote by 20Tigers

Whenever someone comes to me and says they want to learn, or that they want their kids to learn and ask what kind of guitar they should get. I spend a long time talking to them about making a decent investment in a reasonable quality instrument. One of the biggest impediments to learning an instrument is learning on a piece of shit instrument.


I agree here, but at the same time I wouldn't tell someone who is on a tight budget not to buy a guitar because he can't afford a nice one. I would tell him to do considerable research on what is the best guitar he can get in his price range and start somewhere. it is better to have a crap guitar rather than no guitar.

I started on the worst of the worst and every time I managed to save up and upgrade my gear it was an amazing experience to feel and hear the difference of a higher level guitar.
#26
^ Yeah it's definitely a judgement call, and will vary for each person. It's sort of a balancing act between getting a guitar sometime soon (because as you said, you won't get any better with no guitar) but not having to make do with something which is so bad that it might put you off (in which case I'd say no guitar might be better than a really bad one ).

Quote by HotspurJr
Oh, I largely agree.

But, for example, a lot of expensive guitars have better dynamics than cheaper guitars. On the cheapie, everything sounds about the same volume. You switch to a more dynamic guitar, and you suddenly hear that you're not playing consistently volume-wise.

In the long run, that's great. It'll help you get better control of your dynamics. I would never argue for getting a cheaper guitar because it doesn't show you your flaws in the same way. But when you sit down with one after playing a cheapie you might be surprised at what you hear. "Oh, I didn't know I was doing that. I better work on it."


Is that the guitar or the rest of the gear, though?
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#27
Quote by Himynameisben95
I play better when I feel like I am fighting the instrument. Guitars with really low action and slinky as **** strings bore me. It feels like I'm not actually doing anything. My favourite guitars I've played so far were my LPJ and an ES-33

(edit: es-335)


Right on, I'm the same way.
I play pretty hard and low action just doesn't work for me.
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#28
Quote by Victorgeiger
I agree here, but at the same time I wouldn't tell someone who is on a tight budget not to buy a guitar because he can't afford a nice one. I would tell him to do considerable research on what is the best guitar he can get in his price range and start somewhere. it is better to have a crap guitar rather than no guitar.

I started on the worst of the worst and every time I managed to save up and upgrade my gear it was an amazing experience to feel and hear the difference of a higher level guitar.



Often times people can spend more than they think they can and that so-called tight budget is them being scared to spend more because they aren't sure if they'll like it. I tell these people that a somewhat nicer guitar (doesn't have to be stellar) will be easier to sell if they decide to not learn the instrument, which will lose them about the same money in the long run.

I've seen enough people quit because the instrument they started on was of the absolute worst quality and they blamed all of the problems on themselves, declared themselves too stupid to play guitar, then quit. Sometimes, no guitar is better than any guitar. A year of waiting to get something worthwhile could be the difference between playing the rest of one's life versus quitting within a couple months and having a lifelong opinion that you're not cut out for playing guitar.


For those on an actual tight budget, of course, get whatever you can afford.
#29
I got way better and more committed, more enjoyment when I went from a squire to a prestige. Not just the tone and feel, but the tuning stability etc, it all adds up to a big plus. That being said, a well set up squire will beat a crap setup prestige any day, so that's more important
#30
Well sure if you don't especially care for the way your guitar sounds, and then you buy a new one and you love the way it sounds, you're going to practice more. But generally speaking I'm sure there are plenty of guys with budget equipment who can play rings around guys with whole rooms full of top-of-the-line guitars and amps.

It all comes down to how much you love the music, not how much disposable income you've got.
#31
Quote by gtc83
Well sure if you don't especially care for the way your guitar sounds, and then you buy a new one and you love the way it sounds, you're going to practice more. But generally speaking I'm sure there are plenty of guys with budget equipment who can play rings around guys with whole rooms full of top-of-the-line guitars and amps.

It all comes down to how much you love the music, not how much disposable income you've got.

Yeah. It's not that good gear makes you play better. Bad gear just makes you play worse. But a good guitarist playing a bad guitar and amp will still sound really good.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#32
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Yeah. It's not that good gear makes you play better. Bad gear just makes you play worse. But a good guitarist playing a bad guitar and amp will still sound really good.


Yeah. If there's some theoretical perfect guitar, then it lets you play with absolutely zero limitations. Everything worse than that puts slightly (or a lot) more obstacles in your way. That's the way I think about it.

And yeah obviously a good player is still a good player on crappy kit. Said same player will likely sound and play better on better kit, though.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?