#1
Hi,

I'm living in Thailand right now, and have a chance to order a nice guitar from Holland (home country) and have it brought over.

I am playing a style like Rodrigo y Gabriela and I use my iPod as a looping machine.
http://youtu.be/drCv1BCa4xA

Right now i have a simple classic guitar (Aura) without internal microphone, so my drumming is not amplified.

I'm leaning toward buying something like an Ibanez EWN28SYENT
http://www.accentmusic.com/Ibanez-EWN28SYENT-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-p/79126.htm
Then add a Fishman Ellipse Matrix Blend for the percussion.

Does anyone have experience with this kind of setup? Is the Ellipse the way to go?
Is there a guitar setup and ready for this kinda music?
My budget is around 700 euro.

Thanks a lot!
#2
I've played those in both the steel and nylon versions, and they don't IMO sound good acoustically. - They are built for looks and amplification. I would go for something like a Cordoba Fusion or a Yamaha with pickup, but maybe if you drum hard you need durability at the expense of acoustic tone. FWIW, I think any piezo pickup should amplify the drumming; my Maton with their AP4 system certainly does. Maybe someone else can comment on that
#3
Hmm, thanks.
After a full day searching, the Yamaha NTX700 caught my interest. It's a cheaper version of the on Rodrigo uses. Only difference is different wood, but still with a spruce top. I read reviews and people seem to really love the System61 2way A.R.T pickup system it comes with.
http://asia.yamaha.com/en/products/m...up_thumb02.jpg

I'm thinking of combining this with the Baggs Lyric, but it will mean 2 jack outputs. Maybe an extra hole in the guitar and I guess a small mixer with maybe even an equalizer.

Is this all possible? Will i have any complications?
#4
Quote by Live loops
Hmm, thanks.
After a full day searching, the Yamaha NTX700 caught my interest. It's a cheaper version of the on Rodrigo uses. Only difference is different wood, but still with a spruce top. I read reviews and people seem to really love the System61 2way A.R.T pickup system it comes with.
http://asia.yamaha.com/en/products/m...up_thumb02.jpg

I'm thinking of combining this with the Baggs Lyric, but it will mean 2 jack outputs. Maybe an extra hole in the guitar and I guess a small mixer with maybe even an equalizer.

Is this all possible? Will i have any complications?


It certainly looks like a reasonable choice to me. I don't think there would be a problem with the Lyric system in terms of installation and mixing, but I would just try the system that comes with it first. You might well find that it works fine for drumming, and the Lyric could turn out to be too much of a good thing in that context. In general terms, piezo systems work well with nylon string guitars, because the quack that piezos are prone to counteracts the soft attack of inexpensive nylon strings.

Have a look at the Cordoba Fusion series as well. They are seem to be highly regarded among inexpensive nylon string guitars. My mate has this one in his shop, and I like its feel and acoustic tone a lot. - But I generally prefer cedar tops on inexpensive nylon strings:

http://www.zzounds.com/item--CODFUS12CESPIN


I haven't tried it plugged in.
#5
Quote by Tony Done
....[ ].....Have a look at the Cordoba Fusion series as well. They are seem to be highly regarded among inexpensive nylon string guitars. My mate has this one in his shop, and I like its feel and acoustic tone a lot. - But I generally prefer cedar tops on inexpensive nylon strings:

http://www.zzounds.com/item--CODFUS12CESPIN


I haven't tried it plugged in.
I came across seemingly ages ago: http://www.adirondackguitar.com/lefty/cordoba/fusion_jet14.htm This is a lefty version. Ostensibly, it should be easier to find in a RH version:

I know less than you about it. But, it does have a solid cedar top!

It comes in both a 12 fret, and 14 fret version, (as shown).
#6
Quote by Captaincranky
I came across seemingly ages ago: http://www.adirondackguitar.com/lefty/cordoba/fusion_jet14.htm This is a lefty version. Ostensibly, it should be easier to find in a RH version:

I know less than you about it. But, it does have a solid cedar top!

It comes in both a 12 fret, and 14 fret version, (as shown).


Looks good to me.

Just as a matter of general interest, I like cedar tops on inexpensive nylon string guitars and inexpensive steel strings for fingerpicking (one of my Matons has a cedar top) because they have good bright projection that doesn't need as much driving as a spruce top. They tend to liven up what might otherwise be a dull guitar - as Takamine realised decades ago. The downside is that they have less headroom than spruce, so they aren't as well suited to hard flatpicking or strumming.

It doesn't mention in the specs, but AFAIK, all those Fusion models have a slightly narrower neck than a standard classical, and the board has a radius. Steel-string player might like them better than classical neck.
Last edited by Tony Done at Jul 26, 2014,
#7
Quote by Tony Done
....[ ]....Just as a matter of general interest, I like cedar tops on inexpensive nylon string guitars and inexpensive steel strings for fingerpicking (one of my Matons has a cedar top) because they have good bright projection that doesn't need as much driving as a spruce top. They tend to liven up what might otherwise be a dull guitar - as Takamine realised decades ago. The downside is that they have less headroom than spruce, so they aren't as well suited to hard flatpicking or strumming.
I saved this page and link it once in a while when questions pop up about materials: http://www.pantheonguitars.com/tonewoods.htm It's nice to know that practical application and experience tracks with the theoretical.

Quote by Tony Done
It doesn't mention in the specs, but AFAIK, all those Fusion models have a slightly narrower neck than a standard classical, and the board has a radius. Steel-string player might like them better than classical neck.
Yeah, I have the impression that's what the "Fusion" designation is implying. The guitars are approaching a typical, (and possibly more familiar), steel string type of configuration.

I think that might hold true of Ovation's nylon string models as well. It's been so long that I've seen one, I wouldn't dare to speak with any authority about them. I know Al Stewart's guitarist, Peter White, and Al DiMeola rip up on them.

EDIT: If you've never seen it, you should give a look that Keith Medley video I posted in the other thread: (Or from the horse's mouth at YouTube): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zj5-vKuXT8s&list=RDZj5-vKuXT8s
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 26, 2014,
#8
Quote by Captaincranky
I saved this page and link it once in a while when questions pop up about materials: http://www.pantheonguitars.com/tonewoods.htm It's nice to know that practical application and experience tracks with the theoretical.

Yeah, I have the impression that's what the "Fusion" designation is implying. The guitars are approaching a typical, (and possibly more familiar), steel string type of configuration.

I think that might hold true of Ovation's nylon string models as well. It's been so long that I've seen one, I wouldn't dare to speak with any authority about them. I know Al Stewart's guitarist, Peter White, and Al DiMeola rip up on them.

EDIT: If you've never seen it, you should give a look that Keith Medley video I posted in the other thread: (Or from the horse's mouth at YouTube): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zj5-vKuXT8s&list=RDZj5-vKuXT8s


Yeah, I watched that vid, and love the way it builds up. I wonder if he retunes the harp strings for different tunes, or whether he adapts his arrangements to a ssingle tuning?

The one or two Ovation nylon strings I've seen had standard classical style necks IIRC, but I agree that they were killer guitars when amplified. John Williams played one when he had the group "Sky", and Yngwie Malmsteen used one on his "Trilogy" album.

I had a nylon string solidbody for a while, and I wish now that I had kept it, but the reso I converted for nylon strings is good fun.