#1
so after a LOT of searching, we finally found a lead guitarist for our band. He's our age (16) and has been playing for 3 years. He even turned out to be a nice person and actually has a lot of desire to be in our band.

So today we jam, and he turns out to be a metal freak. Like in love with Bullet for My Valentine, Avenged Sevenfold, Metallica, etc. Which isn't necessarily bad because it's his taste, but our band is a bit more blues/hard rock and some alternative type of songs as well. So when he was improvising to a funk rhythm today (i'm the rhythm guitarist), he was playing some mad metal solos or something.

He's a self-taught guy and isn't in love with 'lightning fast solos and kewlz arpeggios'. I told him to play a slow solo and he thought slow solos are boring. And I noticed that his basics are a bit weak as well in some cases- he sometimes misses the beat and couldn't properly even play the 'oh so boring and simple' lead part of Boulevard of Broken Dreams, but can play many Kirk Hammett solos. I've been only playing for only 1.5 years and can't play too much, but I feel like whatever I can play, I can play solidly.

Now I know some of you think we should kick him out as his style doesn't match ours. But he's a good guy and in our area, it's very difficult to find lead guitarists interested in our band and if he's out we'll have nothing. So I'm just seeking your advice on our situation.
#2
The best advice I can give is to be honest upfront. Tell him now that you are questioning whether he fits in with your sound. If he wants to work toward playing what you think he should be playing then that's great. But if not, it will save you all the trouble of having a long, drawn out 'relationship' based on you getting the lead guitarist you want. It sounds like you know what you want in a lead guitarist so you could do it yourself and find a rhythm guitarist or go without a true lead and see where you get.

That being said- everyone has their own style and that will come through whether trying to play a certain genre or not. That's what makes playing in a band fun for me...you get 4-6 people with different influences in a room and see what comes out. A new genre may be born from that interaction. Or you get the same recycled ideas if everyone has influences that are too similar.

Also, if you are playing covers then allow time to learn the piece of music. Just because a solo or lead line is simple and you know it well does not mean that everyone else that plays guitar has memorized said piece. We all take different routes to learning how to play.

Just my two cents. Hope something in there is useful.
#3
If you're in a cover band, and he doesn't want to learn the songs properly, he's not a very good fit.

You've noted that he struggles playing slow solos. As your ear develops you'll realise that he struggles playing fast solos too.

As a note for the future, if any band member ever says "I'm not playing X because it's boring/easy", that's a huge warning sign that it's not going to work out. It means that the person would rather play a part that shows them off than a part which is good for the song and you music will suffer as a result.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#4
Everybody brings different stuff to the party. The trick is matching various talents to the music at hand. Have a band discussion and talk about goals, musical styles, and playing material that is well suited to your skills. Maybe you get to play the lyrical solos and he will be in reserve for the barn-burners. It can work if you are are all in this together. Pointing fingers and saying "you are this or that" generally reduces bands to rubble.

After a frank conversation with all the members you will figure it out. Lead guitarist will adapt, the band will adapt or he will move on to something more up his alley.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Jul 25, 2014,
#5
Quote by Aichuuk
I told him to play a slow solo and he thought slow solos are boring. And I noticed that his basics are a bit weak as well in some cases- he sometimes misses the beat and couldn't properly even play the 'oh so boring and simple' lead part of Boulevard of Broken Dreams, but can play many Kirk Hammett solos.

Kick him out and learn how to play lead yourself, or kick him out and find a new lead guitarist. Yes, I realize lead guitar players may be hard to find. But if he can't or won't play the bolded type of thing, then he's more trouble than he's worth.
#6
While I agree with the other guys, I just want to comment on this bit;

Quote by Aichuuk
it's very difficult to find lead guitarists interested in our band and if he's out we'll have nothing.


Technically, you already have nothing, because you have a guitarist who refuses to fit with the band properly. You can't gig with him like this, so it's basically the same as not having a lead guitarist at all. You're not beholden to this guy, so don't feel like you are.

Also, the whole time I was reading your post I was reminded of that one scene in the episode of Metalocalypse where Skwisgaar and Toki were trying to learn the blues. They had to play with cinderblocks tied to their fingers because they were playing too fast.
#7
Find middle ground between your music and his, share each other's musical tastes and discuss likes/dislikes about all of it. If he's a reasonable guy (and if you are as well), then communication about this shouldn't be difficult.