#1
Hi,

I'm looking at getting a new guitar. At the moment I have an ESP LTD and I'm looking for an upgrade/change. As much as I love the guitar I have, I want something with a thicker/faster neck.

I mainly play metal, rock and blues (primarily metal), anything from AC/DC to A7X to Billy Talent. I play a lot of improv and I love to play scales so I'd like something that would cover these areas well. I'd also like a floyd rose if it's within my budget (£500-£750).

Ideally, I'd like this to be my go-to guitar indefinitely (I wanna be playing this for the next 30 years) so I'd like it to be very well built and not have to make any modifications.

I've looked at a few brands that I'm interested in like Schecter, Ibanez and PRS (especially PRS) and I can't come to a decision, so I was wondering if anyone had tried any of these guitars and would recommend them or suggest a few more.

Thanks for any advice you can give me.
#2
Well, within your price point, the PRS SE custom(I have one in tobacco burst)is a good guitar.
The trem won't take the sort of abuse an FR or similar will, but on the other hand, for tuning stability and comfort, I rate it far above the trem on my Mexi strat. It's also got a coil split, so there's a bit of extra tonal variety in there, too. Can't really say where it sits with regards to neck thickness, though.
As for something with an FR, I got my Jackson soloist for around the £750 mark. It's neck-through, so the heel is very comfortable. I've had no issues with the FR as yet. This has a thinner neck than the PRS, but again, what that means next to your current guitar... If you can get one to try, I'd suggest giving it a go.
#3
It's worth considering the new Washburn Parallaxe series. I've always used Washies and they are real shredders with a massive range of specs and tones, as well as the extended cutaway like on Nuno Bettencourts guitar.
#4
If they don't look too 80s for you it's hard to beat the japanese-made Charvels Richtone has in stock (or coming into stock) for £600.

What do you mean by "thicker/faster neck"? Most would say thinner is faster.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#5
Thank you all for the advice. I find it hard to play with thin necks due the size of my hands and I struggle to get any speed when the strings are so close together.

Are there any Washburn Parallaxes you'd recommend in particular? Really like the look of them.
#6
For blues, rock and some metal with a fatter neck, I'd recommend looking at Reverend Guitars. The necks are a medium oval- not too fat, not too skinny. Nearly all models are well within your budget.

Which would be best for you depends on exactly what you want to play. If you play more metal, look for models with the RailHammer Chisel (hotter) or Anvil (hottest) pickups. The regular HBs and RailHammer HyperVintage pickups will handle everything else.

Where to buy in the UK:
www.vintageandmodernguitars.co.uk/reverendsetneckguitars.html
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#7
Quote by louishasler
Thank you all for the advice. I find it hard to play with thin necks due the size of my hands and I struggle to get any speed when the strings are so close together.

Are there any Washburn Parallaxes you'd recommend in particular? Really like the look of them.

It may be that rather than a thick/thin neck, you might want to look at different fingerboard radii. More or less curve might help your playing comfort.
#8
Quote by louishasler
Thank you all for the advice. I find it hard to play with thin necks due the size of my hands and I struggle to get any speed when the strings are so close together.

Are there any Washburn Parallaxes you'd recommend in particular? Really like the look of them.


ah ok, no worries

i haven't tried the parallaxes. i haven't really tried any washburns since the old pro series (x40 pro, x50 pro and the idols), which were pretty nice. No idea what they're like now, though.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#9
Quote by slapsymcdougal
Well, within your price point, the PRS SE custom(I have one in tobacco burst)is a good guitar.
The trem won't take the sort of abuse an FR or similar will, but on the other hand, for tuning stability and comfort, I rate it far above the trem on my Mexi strat. It's also got a coil split, so there's a bit of extra tonal variety in there, too. Can't really say where it sits with regards to neck thickness, though.
As for something with an FR, I got my Jackson soloist for around the £750 mark. It's neck-through, so the heel is very comfortable. I've had no issues with the FR as yet. This has a thinner neck than the PRS, but again, what that means next to your current guitar... If you can get one to try, I'd suggest giving it a go.


Well, PRS DID just come out with an SE Custom 24 with a Floyd on it, although it may be a bit above his budget. I'm not sure how much it would be in pounds.
#10
You mentioned the size of your hands being a factor, but didn't mention WHAT size they were. Large? Small? I've got XXL glove size hands. My preference is for fairly wide string spacing, and flat fretboard radii. Both of the guitars I'm using most right now have 16" radius fretboards and jumbo frets. Both are 1 3/4" wide at the nut, and Floyd Rose makes a locking nut for that width. The bridges are standard width, however, so you lose any extra string spacing as you move that direction, but since bridges are wider than nuts, it's not a big deal.

You mentioned "thicker/faster neck" -- generally that's antithetical.

Thicker is not something you usually hear mentioned with faster. If you find yourself playing with your thumb joint locked open (rather than rounded), you've got a technique issue you should probably address immediately, or you're going to end up looking for baseball bats. Generally speaking, thicker necks go to folks who have "rock and roll" technique (thumb wrap) and weak, small, or arthritic hands.

They're essentially using the big muscle in the palm of their hand under their thumb to gain enough strength for deep bends, etc. They'll also be playing with the treble side of the guitar neck touching the pads on the palm of their hand just under the fingers. They're fast within a four-fret box and usually not using their little finger much, but don't often extend beyond that.

If you have large hands, you have the same advantage large-handed piano players have -- range and potential strength. You really shouldn't be feeling the guitar neck in the palm of your hand at all (rarely), and your thumb should be spending most of its time near the center of the back of the neck, and the rest of the thumb shouldn't be on the guitar. Thus, a thin neck shouldn't cause you pain in your thumb/wrist.

All that said, if you have large hands, and if you were in the US, I'd point you at two of my favorites: Agile makes some guitars in a "wide" neck (with a very comfortable thickness) with a 1 3/4" nut. They will also make you a custom guitar with a Floyd and a wide nut (I have one, with a second on the way). Radius on my custom is 16".

Jim Soloway (Soloway guitars) custom makes a guitar that's out of your budget, but that would be killer. He makes a "Fingerstyle" neck that's got a 1 13/16ths" nut width, and a custom bridge that maintains that 1/8th" width advantage all the way down the neck. It's also got a 16" radius, and can be had with a 27", 25.5" or 24.75" scale (if you have large hands, you may want to stick with 25.5" and up scales for greater fret spacing in the upper frets).

And finally, take a look at the Variax JTV 89 or 89F (Floyd). Again, out of your budget (unless you buy used), and you may or may NOT care about the modeling and alternate tunings built into the guitar, but just as a fast guitar, it's excellent. 16" radius, 24 frets, 25.5" scale, fast neck, satin finish on the back, fairly smooth (for a bolt-on) neck heel, very good pickups. The Floyd version is one of the better guitars I've played for speed.

Yet another guitar that's out of your budget and that's not ordinarily showing up in your location is the Carvin. There are custom radii out to 20" (nearly flat) and custom neck profiles can be had, but their fretwork as delivered from the factory is amazing.

Last thing; find a tech with a PLEK machine. If you're looking for speed, he will become your best friend.
#11
Quote by maddog61
Well, PRS DID just come out with an SE Custom 24 with a Floyd on it, although it may be a bit above his budget. I'm not sure how much it would be in pounds.

Link here's one at £699, froma UK retailer.

Assuming that's the one you mean.