#1
Background knowledge: I've been playing guitar since about february of this year. I play 2 hours a day most days, and it was shitty as first, then I got to a point where I was reading tabs and enjoying playing. As of right now, I'm not great at playing at all honestly and I have a small amount of knowledge on how to play. When I play I kind of just play random chords that sound okay together but I'm not getting better at playing or am I making any music that sounds good. I've tried delving into scales as people at my local guitar center have suggested it, and i've learnt to play a few somewhat fluently, but I'm just not getting better. I'm getting pissed at where I am with it and I'm just not simply getting better for all the work i've put into it. I have friends that play guitar but they usually just give me trollish suggestions then laugh and don't really offer any real advice which kind of just makes it worse honestly. I don't know if anyone will get anything out of this post but I figured it couldn't hurt to try. If anyone can offer any advice in any way shape or form, please do. If anyone is willing to talk to help me, by all means. If anyone wants to try to be a mentor for a short while to show me some things to see if maybe I can find my way, I'd love to try. This isn't a post of me being lazy because I'm not great at guitar, this is me being genuinely confused with what I should do. I've tried learning songs I like, but it's simply not making me any better, and on my cheap ass squier guitar it doesn't sound great. Going to stop the rambling here and see where this goes.
#2
So the question is:

What do you want to be able to do with the guitar? What kind of music do you want to make?
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#3
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
So the question is:

What do you want to be able to do with the guitar? What kind of music do you want to make?

The kind of music I've looked into learning is just kind of like slow 60's music, really calm and melodic I guess. Issue is as much as i've tried to learn that kind of stuff I just always seem to fail and make mistakes and not get any better. I don't want to learn anything hardcore, that's for sure. And well known songs you hear on rock n roll radio stations annoy me because i've been hearing them since I was like 5 anyways. I just more or less have no direction, and with what I do have direction for I have no guidance for it.
#4
In what way do you want to play better?

As this your only post I can only go by what you have written so far.

As I say and have said always practise your weak spots. If something you play is boring to you then practise what you do not practise aka the weak spots. To make it interesting and fun.

Ask your self why is this so boring when you play and the answer will properly come at some point then you know where to go.
#5
What music inspires you? Learn to play that.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#6
Quote by anders.jorgense
In what way do you want to play better?

As this your only post I can only go by what you have written so far.

As I say and have said always practise your weak spots. If something you play is boring to you then practise what you do not practise aka the weak spots. To make it interesting and fun.

Ask your self why is this so boring when you play and the answer will properly come at some point then you know where to go.


I want to be able to understand what I'm actually playing and make music that sounds good together, not random non-sense chords with high pitched sounds. I want to be play songs fluently, but i'm always confused with what to do because I get told there's no set way to learn guitar, then someone turns around and tells me there's a set way. It's just so goddamned confusing because everyone has a different opinion and tries to force it on you, and you keep having to start over and try new things. And even though I'm accumulating some knowledge from it, it's just not appealing or satisfying to not have an understanding of what you're doing but trudge forward at a painstakingly slow rate. It's relying on blind faith; you can pray and hope things go well, but it doesn't mean you're going to get anywhere until you can make your own rationalizations and truly understand what you're trying to do. That's the basis of my confusion and weak spots I suppose, if that's even considered a weak spot.
#7
It sounds like you hit a plateau improving-wise. I don't really know anything else to do to get over it except to keep playing, but keep playing harder stuff than you feel comfortable playing. You won't be bored playing guitar if your brain is working hard to learn new material and techniques
Quote by AlexRussell
The kind of music I've looked into learning is just kind of like slow 60's music, really calm and melodic I guess. Issue is as much as i've tried to learn that kind of stuff I just always seem to fail and make mistakes and not get any better. I don't want to learn anything hardcore, that's for sure. And well known songs you hear on rock n roll radio stations annoy me because i've been hearing them since I was like 5 anyways. I just more or less have no direction, and with what I do have direction for I have no guidance for it.

I'd say to stick with trying to play that music that you've had trouble learning. Try slowing it down more, and playing with a metronome?
In your most recent post, you also said that you wanted to understand the stuff behind what you're playing. Have you tried learning some theory so you can understand how chords are made and so you aren't just playing the shape, but understanding where the notes are coming from?
I also don't think you should be feeling like you need to "start over" whenever someone gives you some new advice, unless that advice involves delving into a whole different genre of music that you never played before, which I would recommend anyways. I hit a plateau myself in the very beginning when I was just playing guitar for strumming along to pop songs and I eventually started learning some rock and I got better because I had a new interest in guitar and I was learning a whole different way to play guitar that involved soloing and such. I just got all my info from personal experience in trying to get over my own frustration when I wasn't improving at playing. I hope it helps you. Good luck!
#8
Quote by yamahaducky8910
It sounds like you hit a plateau improving-wise. I don't really know anything else to do to get over it except to keep playing, but keep playing harder stuff than you feel comfortable playing. You won't be bored playing guitar if your brain is working hard to learn new material and techniques

I'd say to stick with trying to play that music that you've had trouble learning. Try slowing it down more, and playing with a metronome?
In your most recent post, you also said that you wanted to understand the stuff behind what you're playing. Have you tried learning some theory so you can understand how chords are made and so you aren't just playing the shape, but understanding where the notes are coming from?
I also don't think you should be feeling like you need to "start over" whenever someone gives you some new advice, unless that advice involves delving into a whole different genre of music that you never played before, which I would recommend anyways. I hit a plateau myself in the very beginning when I was just playing guitar for strumming along to pop songs and I eventually started learning some rock and I got better because I had a new interest in guitar and I was learning a whole different way to play guitar that involved soloing and such. I just got all my info from personal experience in trying to get over my own frustration when I wasn't improving at playing. I hope it helps you. Good luck!


So, your advice for me is to playing more challenging stuff than I've already tried to learn but failed at, only to play the more challenging stuff slower and to just keep trying? Which I mean it makes sense, but a friend told me to just learn really easy classic rock and go from there. Your logic makes sense, and I know there isn't a magic answer but I guess i'll just keep trying.
#9
Quote by AlexRussell
The kind of music I've looked into learning is just kind of like slow 60's music, really calm and melodic I guess. Issue is as much as i've tried to learn that kind of stuff I just always seem to fail and make mistakes and not get any better. I don't want to learn anything hardcore, that's for sure. And well known songs you hear on rock n roll radio stations annoy me because i've been hearing them since I was like 5 anyways. I just more or less have no direction, and with what I do have direction for I have no guidance for it.


Wait, wait, wait... you're giving up because you make mistakes?

The only way you ever fail is if you give up.

The really important thing, however, is that you find out why you're not improving. Like... what's going wrong when you try and play these songs?
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#10
Quote by AlexRussell
So, your advice for me is to playing more challenging stuff than I've already tried to learn but failed at, only to play the more challenging stuff slower and to just keep trying? Which I mean it makes sense, but a friend told me to just learn really easy classic rock and go from there. Your logic makes sense, and I know there isn't a magic answer but I guess i'll just keep trying.



http://justinguitar.com/ This website should be able to help you out it has structured courses ranging in different styles it even has a beginners, and intermediate course that you can go through if you want to understand the things you're playing.

#11
don't start playing music to impress anyone. play because you feel it in your f-u-c-k-i-n-g bones. learn really easy songs, or just learn chords right now and timing. 1-2-3-4 x4 is a good starter.

G G G G
D D D D
C C C C
C C C C
x4

play this simple little g major progression with down strokes, then once you're comfortable with it, try it in down(1 and 3) and up(2 and 4) strokes. it's one of the most common progressions in music.

once you can do this perfectly without missing a beat, move on to another easy progression. learn your circle of 5ths and chords that compliment each other.

learning a scale is really easy. just start with learning what notes are in it first. you don't need to learn it all over the board at the start, just start with the root note up to the next octave of that note, for example G to the next G. all you need to know is what's in it. and play those chords belonging to that note within that scale.

i suggest the Gmajor to start. it mostly has all the common chords, and if you know that scale, you'll know the Eminor scale too, which is very common also.

Gmaj, Amin, Bmin, Cmaj, Dmaj, Emin, F#maj, Gmaj.

once you got those down, start experimenting and have fun. make up some little tunes. just stick with 4/4 for now and get tight with your timing. forget about learning the harder/"cooler" stuff for now. just master, to the best of your abilities, the basics first. once you do, the rest won't be as tough as you think.


also, if you're gonna get pissed off because you're not making progress(you haven't even been playing a whole year yet, for fvck sakes lol), just put the guitar down, and come back to it when you're in the mood for it. the only time i ever see anyone get mad at playing music is when some poser has "something to prove". get over that attitude and play it for the love of it, because music is something that's supposed to make you feel good. otherwise, you might as well just quit right now. good luck.
Last edited by Manovvar at Jul 27, 2014,
#12
Quote by AlexRussell
So, your advice for me is to playing more challenging stuff than I've already tried to learn but failed at, only to play the more challenging stuff slower and to just keep trying? Which I mean it makes sense, but a friend told me to just learn really easy classic rock and go from there. Your logic makes sense, and I know there isn't a magic answer but I guess i'll just keep trying.


I think the only way anybody improves is by playing stuff that's challenging for them. It doesn't matter if some basic chords are challenging for you, or barre chords, or anything really. As long as it's hard but not impossible, that's what you should be playing to keep improving. That is, if the stuff you are playing right now is all very easy for you, which is the impression I got from your OP. You only just started playing guitar, and it's not quick or easy. Just have patience and have fun! Repeat, have fun!
#13
You're kinda tiptoeing away from the root of the issue OP. Because from what I've gathered after reading your posts, this isn't a guitar technique problem. This is a music theory problem. Basically, your problem is...

You have no idea what you're playing musically.

The answer to that is simple - learn music theory. Start with the basics by learning the notes, intervals, and major scale formula. You say you know how to play some scales fluently, but it really doesn't sound like you actually KNOW what scales are to begin with. If I told you to write out a major scale in the key of A... could you do it? If not, you need to go back and learn the basics of theory.
#14
Quote by Manovvar
don't start playing music to impress anyone. play because you feel it in your f-u-c-k-i-n-g bones. learn really easy songs, or just learn chords right now and timing. 1-2-3-4 x4 is a good starter.

G G G G
D D D D
C C C C
C C C C
x4

play this simple little g major progression with down strokes, then once you're comfortable with it, try it in down(1 and 3) and up(2 and 4) strokes. it's one of the most common progressions in music.

once you can do this perfectly without missing a beat, move on to another easy progression. learn your circle of 5ths and chords that compliment each other.

learning a scale is really easy. just start with learning what notes are in it first. you don't need to learn it all over the board at the start, just start with the root note up to the next octave of that note, for example G to the next G. all you need to know is what's in it. and play those chords belonging to that note within that scale.

i suggest the Gmajor to start. it mostly has all the common chords, and if you know that scale, you'll know the Eminor scale too, which is very common also.

Gmaj, Amin, Bmin, Cmaj, Dmaj, Emin, F#maj, Gmaj.

once you got those down, start experimenting and have fun. make up some little tunes. just stick with 4/4 for now and get tight with your timing. forget about learning the harder/"cooler" stuff for now. just master, to the best of your abilities, the basics first. once you do, the rest won't be as tough as you think.


also, if you're gonna get pissed off because you're not making progress(you haven't even been playing a whole year yet, for fvck sakes lol), just put the guitar down, and come back to it when you're in the mood for it. the only time i ever see anyone get mad at playing music is when some poser has "something to prove". get over that attitude and play it for the love of it, because music is something that's supposed to make you feel good. otherwise, you might as well just quit right now. good luck.


I can already do all of that. I don't know where to go beyond this. I can already play the basic chords without looking at my guitar and I can transition fine. As for getting pissed over it, it's because I don't know what to do, who to talk to, or who to believe for where I'm getting my advice. As for having something to prove, I got myself into guitar and I always play by myself. So, there's nothing to prove for anything and I never play infront of anyone. I just, don't know what to do I guess.
#15
it's understandable, and i never said personally that's the reason why YOU would get mad(it was merely a thought, since it sounds like you're bothered by your friends making fun of you), but regardless, it shouldn't make you mad or should you ever play mad.

the internet is full of information beyond basics, if you're already familiar. i only suggested basics, because from the OP, it sounds like that's where you're struggling. even though you know the chords, you also say that you just play them randomly. i'm just offering you a structure/progression in the key/scale of Gmaj(one of the most common, aside from Cmaj/Amin, Emaj, Amaj, etc). which is basically what you should be working on, instead of random changing chords. i added the other chords belonging to that scale(which is the same in Emin), so that you could structurize your own progressions in an actual scale, rather than blind chords that you have to guess at to make sound good together. random will make you progress very slowly or not at all(if it frustrates you to the point of never picking your guitar up again).

beyond that, i have no idea what you're wanting to learn, because that's where the info stops lol.

the only other advice i can offer you is, learn from bands that you like. check out lessons/covers on youtube, get some tabs and just work on them til you get them tight. you'll pick up all sorts of patterns, shapes, phrases, rhythms, etc, etc, and sooner or later stuff will sink in and make sense as to why this note works with that note and why this note doesnt work with that one.
Last edited by Manovvar at Jul 29, 2014,
#16
Posting a video of your playing would really help, i can't really add anything that everyone else hasn't already said but a video would make it easier for us to tell you what you should work on
"Music Without Emotion Is Like Food Without Flavour"
Paul Gilbert
#17
Just do something you haven't done before.

I used to practice Stairway To Heaven back when I was just starting out. I quit practicing it for months, went and did some other things for a while. When I finally remembered it a few nights ago I found that lots of things were easier than I had remembered.

Example: I am now leaving a barre across the fifth fret at the beginning of the intro. I used to try to play every note on the fretboard with my first two fingers.
I don't know if I'm playing it "properly" but I know that i've made it easier on myself and the "secret technique" - the barre - is something that I was practicing a lot because I wanted to use it for practicing funk rhythms.

So in other words practicing Daft Punk and Lenny Kravitz made me better at playing the Stairway to Heaven intro.

I think you'll find that a lot. I'm at about the same point that you are and I also had a 'frustration' thread recently. Teaching myself new things has been fairly effective at keeping me happy.
#18
The best answer you received was from b00m, and you didn't address it.

Quote by AlexRussell
I want to be able to understand what I'm actually playing and make music that sounds good together, not random non-sense chords with high pitched sounds.

Learn music theory.
Quote by AlexRussell
I want to be play songs fluently, but i'm always confused with what to do because I get told there's no set way to learn guitar, then someone turns around and tells me there's a set way.

I'm willing to bet that those who told you that there is a definitive path to learning guitar is talking about learning theory.
Quote by AlexRussell
It's just so goddamned confusing because everyone has a different opinion and tries to force it on you,

I don't think there is a serious guitarist out there who will tell you that you won't benefit from learning music theory.
Quote by AlexRussell
and you keep having to start over and try new things. And even though I'm accumulating some knowledge from it, it's just not appealing or satisfying to not have an understanding of what you're doing but trudge forward at a painstakingly slow rate.

Why do you have to start over at all? You should be building on what you already know, unless what you learned was absolutely wrong somehow.
Quote by AlexRussell
It's relying on blind faith; you can pray and hope things go well, but it doesn't mean you're going to get anywhere until you can make your own rationalizations and truly understand what you're trying to do. That's the basis of my confusion and weak spots I suppose, if that's even considered a weak spot.

I think I've said it enough already, and b00m already said it once before I just did. The fact that you have Internet access allows you to have more than enough resources at your disposal (except maybe time, but you could trade some of that practice time) to, at the very least, get a basic understanding of your what you're doing, e.g. playing chords that sound good in the same progression, knowing how to improvise a lead part... Once you start learning, you'll gain a much better understanding and knowledge of the fretboard and opens up many more possibilities for you. It'll seem boring at first, but if I could go back in time just once, I'd probably make myself learn theory as a beginner.
Last edited by chrismendiola at Jul 29, 2014,
#19
Been playing for the same amount of time just a few months. don't time how long i practice for. But pick up my guitar every day. Can play a few chords GDECEmA and a few songs.Four strong winds Neil young. That sort of thing. Sounds terrible my son and wife say. BUT I love every minute of it. Not going far very fast. but I am hear for the long haul.51 year young and having a go at something i shoud have done years ago.
#20
Quote by chrismendiola
The best answer you received was from b00m, and you didn't address it.


Learn music theory.

I'm willing to bet that those who told you that there is a definitive path to learning guitar is talking about learning theory.

I don't think there is a serious guitarist out there who will tell you that you won't benefit from learning music theory.

Why do you have to start over at all? You should be building on what you already know, unless what you learned was absolutely wrong somehow.

I think I've said it enough already, and b00m already said it once before I just did. The fact that you have Internet access allows you to have more than enough resources at your disposal (except maybe time, but you could trade some of that practice time) to, at the very least, get a basic understanding of your what you're doing, e.g. playing chords that sound good in the same progression, knowing how to improvise a lead part... Once you start learning, you'll gain a much better understanding and knowledge of the fretboard and opens up many more possibilities for you. It'll seem boring at first, but if I could go back in time just once, I'd probably make myself learn theory as a beginner.

I feel you, a lot of people have told me to stay away from it, saying things like "Learning music theory is like trying to learn how to describe colors". I've considered it, and right now for where I am (I've been working at it the past week), I think I might just fine a teacher and stick to it there. I stopped playing for about a week after I made this thread and I feel a tiny bit better I suppose, but everyone's imput has helped a lot and it seems I'm getting a pretty common answer for the most part. If there's anything else anyone would like to add go ahead.
#21
Quote by chrismendiola
The best answer you received was from b00m, and you didn't address it.


Learn music theory.

I'm willing to bet that those who told you that there is a definitive path to learning guitar is talking about learning theory.

I don't think there is a serious guitarist out there who will tell you that you won't benefit from learning music theory.

Why do you have to start over at all? You should be building on what you already know, unless what you learned was absolutely wrong somehow.

I think I've said it enough already, and b00m already said it once before I just did. The fact that you have Internet access allows you to have more than enough resources at your disposal (except maybe time, but you could trade some of that practice time) to, at the very least, get a basic understanding of your what you're doing, e.g. playing chords that sound good in the same progression, knowing how to improvise a lead part... Once you start learning, you'll gain a much better understanding and knowledge of the fretboard and opens up many more possibilities for you. It'll seem boring at first, but if I could go back in time just once, I'd probably make myself learn theory as a beginner.

I really appreciate you pointing out my thick headedness and I agree with you, I guess I'm just hesitating on learning theory because of the stuff i've heard about it. I guess I'm more so worried i'm going to get into it and just find it wasting my time, but it seems a lot of people condone it and a lot of people go against it, so there's only one way to find out and that's trying. Feel free to post any recommendations of where to start? I think I already know the answer but I wouldn't mind your opinion.
#22
Quote by AlexRussell
I feel you, a lot of people have told me to stay away from it, saying things like "Learning music theory is like trying to learn how to describe colors".


Not sure I'd listen to them when it comes to color either

EDIT: regarding where to start, I like the complete idiot's guide to music theory.

musictheory.net is free but doesn't go as slowly (I think).

though if you're thinking of getting a teacher, if you get a good one, that'd be even better.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
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Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Aug 4, 2014,
#23
Quote by AlexRussell
..."Learning music theory is like trying to learn how to describe colors"


Seems accurate to me, but ironically seems to argue against anti-theory guys.
Quote by Jesus
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#24
^ haha yeah that was sort of my point. whether from a basics approach (most schools/preschools/parents teach their children the colours) or scientific (wavelengths) you can certainly learn the colours.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#25
Yeah, all these arguments for "not learning theory" seem to come from a fundamental misunderstanding of what theory actually is. I have witnessed anti-theory guys argue things like they "don't need to read sheet music to make music", and it's like... who said you can't, and what does that have to do with what we're talking about?!

The way I see music theory is basically just any musical idea or method anyone can recreate under similar conditions. We try to organize and name these things so they make more sense, as well as so people have ways to communicate these concepts to eachother more effectively. I don't think I'm hijacking the definition by saying this.


AlexRussell, I would recommend just analyzing songs you enjoy and studying what you like about them for now; a more specific understanding of what you like about music will help you to see what you have to do to deliberately create what you want. Learning about things like intervals and keys will help you organize and combine the things you already know, and you'll be more versatile in the end.
Quote by Jesus
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#26
Quote by AlexRussell
I feel you, a lot of people have told me to stay away from it, saying things like "Learning music theory is like trying to learn how to describe colors". I've considered it, and right now for where I am (I've been working at it the past week), I think I might just fine a teacher and stick to it there. I stopped playing for about a week after I made this thread and I feel a tiny bit better I suppose, but everyone's imput has helped a lot and it seems I'm getting a pretty common answer for the most part. If there's anything else anyone would like to add go ahead.


It sounds like you're getting a lot bad advice from people that don't really know what they're talking about.

Theory doesn't tell you what or what not to play, it simply explains to you what you are playing.
#27
Quote by AlexRussell
I feel you, a lot of people have told me to stay away from it, saying things like "Learning music theory is like trying to learn how to describe colors". I've considered it, and right now for where I am (I've been working at it the past week), I think I might just fine a teacher and stick to it there. I stopped playing for about a week after I made this thread and I feel a tiny bit better I suppose, but everyone's imput has helped a lot and it seems I'm getting a pretty common answer for the most part. If there's anything else anyone would like to add go ahead.

What's wrong with describing colours? To an artist it's important to really understand colours, how they work together, how to use different shades to create depth, how some colours complement each other to soothe the viewer, whilst others will clash and look jarring and unsettling, how to mix colours together to create new ones and, most importantly, how to communicate all that to other artists.

Now replace colours with sounds

To a musician it's important to really understand sounds, how they work together, how to use different pitches to create depth, how some sounds complement each other to soothe the listener, whilst others will clash and sound jarring and unsettling, how to mix sounds together to create new ones and, most importantly, how to communicate all that to other musicians.

Does that make more sense now?
Actually called Mark!

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#28
^ yeah

Quote by JimDawson
Yeah, all these arguments for "not learning theory" seem to come from a fundamental misunderstanding of what theory actually is. I have witnessed anti-theory guys argue things like they "don't need to read sheet music to make music", and it's like... who said you can't, and what does that have to do with what we're talking about?!

The way I see music theory is basically just any musical idea or method anyone can recreate under similar conditions. We try to organize and name these things so they make more sense, as well as so people have ways to communicate these concepts to eachother more effectively. I don't think I'm hijacking the definition by saying this.


yeah pretty much
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#29
Quote by JimDawson
Yeah, all these arguments for "not learning theory" seem to come from a fundamental misunderstanding of what theory actually is. I have witnessed anti-theory guys argue things like they "don't need to read sheet music to make music", and it's like... who said you can't, and what does that have to do with what we're talking about?!

The way I see music theory is basically just any musical idea or method anyone can recreate under similar conditions. We try to organize and name these things so they make more sense, as well as so people have ways to communicate these concepts to eachother more effectively. I don't think I'm hijacking the definition by saying this.


AlexRussell, I would recommend just analyzing songs you enjoy and studying what you like about them for now; a more specific understanding of what you like about music will help you to see what you have to do to deliberately create what you want. Learning about things like intervals and keys will help you organize and combine the things you already know, and you'll be more versatile in the end.

That makes a lot more sense, it seems "Anti theory" people maybe haven't even really tried it or just have a fear of it? In either case, i'm definitely interested in it.
#30
Quote by b00m
It sounds like you're getting a lot bad advice from people that don't really know what they're talking about.

Theory doesn't tell you what or what not to play, it simply explains to you what you are playing.

Yeah, I really don't know if I should be listening to more than half the people I talk to that play guitar, but they seem to play well in their own right.. I guess they're just doing things that they've found that work for them and perhaps I haven't found what works for me yet? Which could very well be theory.
#31
Quote by steven seagull
What's wrong with describing colours? To an artist it's important to really understand colours, how they work together, how to use different shades to create depth, how some colours complement each other to soothe the viewer, whilst others will clash and look jarring and unsettling, how to mix colours together to create new ones and, most importantly, how to communicate all that to other artists.

Now replace colours with sounds

To a musician it's important to really understand sounds, how they work together, how to use different pitches to create depth, how some sounds complement each other to soothe the listener, whilst others will clash and sound jarring and unsettling, how to mix sounds together to create new ones and, most importantly, how to communicate all that to other musicians.

Does that make more sense now?

That makes a lot of sense, and it's funny how the two are so different yet so similar, music and art that is.
#32
Quote by AlexRussell
That makes a lot more sense, it seems "Anti theory" people maybe haven't even really tried it or just have a fear of it? In either case, i'm definitely interested in it.


Yeah.

i'm not saying they're definitely wrong, because (like anything in life) what works for one person doesn't necessarily work for another. They may well have tried it and not got on with it.

But if they haven't tried it, and are just spouting second-hand things which they think sound cool, I'd ignore them.

EDIT: my own rule is "never listen to local guitar playing friends". guitar players are full of it, most of the time.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#33
I too have been playing a short time, and it is rather frustrating at times. Id say if your serious find a teacher that your comfortable with and learn theory. learning guitar is not a sprint its a marathon, at least thats how I approach it. As frustrating as it is the other side of the coin is how rewarding it is. Look for what inspires you play the music you love, find out how the song works be able to break it down like the time chord progression and such. Im 36 and have been playing half a year and this is the most rewarding thing I have ever done.