#1
I've been wanting a bass guitar for a very long time now. But never really got around saving up money to actually buy one. So I am starting to save up once I turn 18 and using the money I get from my birthday to save up.

So basically, I already got my mind set on what bass I want. A squier precision or jazz.

Now I need an amp to accompany it. I was thinking about a cheap little amp which will provide just a simple bass tone for slap and normal bass. I like to play classic rock. But I never remember hearing a distorted bass sound. Only thing I remember is that sometimes in heavier music. The bass will typically sound really midsy/filthy.

Buget: As cheap as it can get... I already have guitar rig for bass, something to fool around with without a computer.
#2
Looking to gig/jam with friends/drummer in your future bassist career? Or just gonna keep it at home?

for just at home:

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/MAX158V2/ (or even the 10-watt; has gain function)

Wish I could tell you the min amount of watts you'd want if you're gonna jam with drummers and bands. I've only every played/owned 250W+ with gigs/jams so I can't recommend a 50W and say it'll do you good with a drummer. Maybe someone else will comment on behalf of min wattage for those situations
Current Gear:
New York Pro - 5 String Beaut
Some tom delonge green strat my friend made
Boss GT-6
Eden DC210XLT Metro Bass Combo 500W (if anyone else has this model and has any insight about it, do pm me)
#3
Well, bass will be my second instrument. I'm not really sure if I'll ever jam with a drummer. But when I jam I do it in a jamstudio where they already have a bass amp which is powerfull enough ofcourse. It's more something I will have to use if my pc is not within reach, but my bass is. So at home.

But I don't know. Perhaps I will get more interested in bass and I will sooner or later want a good more versatile amp. So perhaps something like a cube would be worth considering?
#4
My Fender BXR is only 60 watts and it does fine in a band setup. I've gigged extensively with it. Watts means nothing when it comes to how lout it gets.
Try to find a used amp at a guitar shop. Get more for your money. Just make sure you play it in the store first. Even if you don't know many licks or riffs, you still know what you want it to sound like.
I would recommend you find something with at least a 10 inch speaker. An 8 is okay for a guitar, but it won't move enough air for a good bass sound in this price range. Peavey makes great practice amps and the Fenders used to be really good. I haven't had much experience with the newer Rumble series, though.
Harmony: Stratocaster
Alvarez: F-200
Schecter: Omen 6
Fender: BXR-60
Dean: Metalman Z Bass (Betty)
Egnator: Tweaker 15
Pearl: Maximum
ESP/LTD: EXP-300
Custom: Harley Quinn Bass
Custom: TK-421 Explorer
A steadily growing supply of pedals
#5
The new Fender Rumbles I've played sound really good. I played a Rumble 100 once, and it suprised me how loud it was considering how small it was. I have a Rumble 30 from the generation (I guess that's the word to use) before these new ones out, and I love it. I had to play a recital once in high school for a project I did on learning blues bass, and the 30 watts was loud enough to be heard in the back of the auditorium with a backing track playing. You can look at the Fender Rumble amps, and another suggestion I could give is the Ampeg BA series. They make a 1x8 (25W) for $100, and a 1x10 (35W and can be played kicked back like a stage monitor speaker, which I think makes it sound better) for $180. It might be a little expensive, but the Fenders and the Ampegs are my suggestions.

If you can, look at used amps. You can probably get about twice the amp for the money.
Gear:

ESP EC-50
ESP FB-204

MXR '78 Custom Badass Distortion
Dunlop Crybaby
MXR EVH Phase 90
MXR Analog Chorus

"Music is the strongest form of magic." - Marilyn Manson
#7
you might have to get into the 2-300$ budget but if you can find some used trace-elliots in local pawn shops or guitar stores, they're stellar and will last forever. i run 2 of them in tandem for my rig and i couldn't be happier

new, they'll cost an arm and a leg, but a lot of people floated with them in the 80s and 90s and their resale value is dirt because they're relatively unknown
#8
Maybe the Zoom B3 is a good idea? I have a brother who already hates me playing guitar. So I can imagine bass will be a hell.
#9
unless you plan on just recording DI, i'd recommend sticking to a good, cheap amp. speakers and acoustics are just such an important part of the sound of a bass, arguably moreso than guitar
#10
I've recently bought a Fender Rumble 40 v3 for smaller jazz gigs as it is very light and portable. The speaker in it is rated at 8 ohms. Does anyone know if the amp would be able to cope if I replaced the speaker with a 4 ohm one to get a little more volume?
#11
When I decided to pick up the bass again after giving up in frustration for 7 years, I bought a Digitech BP-8 multi effect pedal.

It had the JamAlong thing, which kept me playing and kept things quiet.

That was 1999. In 2004 I had a manager at the car dealership I was working for claimed to play guitar, took me to a music store because I told him I played bass.

He was in shock and blurted out to everyone when we got back that it was like an endless Seinfeld segue at the Music store. This guy was the childhood guitarist friend and later pall bearer of Cliff Burton. He told me I had to get an amp and play for people again.

While I settled on a Combo that had a 12" driver and was made out of baltic birch (and just so happens to be the best sounding amp I have ever heard, and stuns audiences), the BP-8 remains in the signal path leaving me driving 4 pre-amps of one form or another.

With the BP-8 you can patch into a powered main speaker from it and be really happy. I had a Drummer in Fort Worth whose brother was a bassist, was looking to upgrade his amp. He came in one day and said he told his brother about the BP-8 so much that he got one and was loving what it did to the rig he already had.

The power of what it will educate you into just by the passive tools, like the notch filter and Noise Gate, cannot be understated. The fact that you have a Tuner at your feet is a handy thing along with the JamAlong function. In the end, the rich Flangers, Phasers, Chorus', compliment the 12AX7 Tube Preamp and a 4 Stage Semi-Parametric (as it has only frequency and level parameters, and no Q adjustment) EQ that allow you to learn much about the sonic and percussive attributes of the instrument.

I have recently picked up a second NeoX400 112t for about $4-500. There is one on Ebay US for $655 right now. That amp and the BP-8 made the Music Director of Dollywood drool in my open audition in 07.

I challenge you to find an inspiring tone. You will play much more.
Ibanez BTB 1006 Fretless and 405 (no Barts)
456 & 455(w/Barts)
Genz Benz NeoX400 112T & NeoX 112T cab.
Digitech BP-8 (x2)
Yamaha PB-1
Boss: SYB-5, PS-2, OD-20, EQ-20, PH-3,BF-3, CE-20, DD-20
Morely A/B
#12
OP, you could look into a "beginner package"... I think squire sells them. Bass and (cheap 10-15 watt) amp in one box for less than separate new. Don't overlook the Bronco bass, either. I picked one up for $90 to my door from GC's used pages and it dethroned the 1991 SR800 I've been playing for 20+ years.

As far as the amp situation, you really should put some serious thought into it. You simply WON'T cut it in a rock band situation with anything smaller than a 10" speaker. I say 100 watts minimum, but with a larger speaker, you can sneak by with less power. Just remember that when it comes to amplifying a bass: cone area is key. 100 watts through a 10 is NOT the same as that same 100 watts through 2-15's. Ask any experienced bass player what they use with their band. I bet few if any go less than 250 watts and 2x10.

If you know for sure you will only be using this amp at home, anything that amplifies sound and has a speaker WILL work. Keep the lower frequencies in check with eq and you'll be ok. IF you put a bass into a guitar amp head with any power, you stand a really good chance of popping guitar speakers. Go above about 50 watts, and you really should use proper bass speakers.

+1 for buying used gear, too. $100 won't get you anywhere near a good rock band rehearsal amp NEW, but can score a decent 1x15 combo used.
#13
Quote by Hail
unless you plan on just recording DI, i'd recommend sticking to a good, cheap amp. speakers and acoustics are just such an important part of the sound of a bass, arguably moreso than guitar


That's what I was taught by my bass players.

They pointed me at building a rig backwards, starting with a speaker cabinet that did what I needed and moving to an amp capable of driving it, then a preamp that gave me the range of tones I wanted, then the guitar.

I had a cheap bass first, of course, to learn on. And because I live in a townhouse, and because a reasonably played bass note here will rattle dinners on both sides of me, I spent most of my bass "learning" time with a used Bass Pod XT (about $80) and a good set of headphones (around $100).
#14
Unless you use front of house support and especially if you play anything other than the quieter styles 200 watt minimum.
At one time you had to have double the amp wattage in speakers now the view is that your speaker will handle Bass frequencies better when they're produced cleanly from the output stage of an amplifier.
A low wattage output stage that is over worked goes into producing square waves which in fact are damaging to a loudspeaker.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#15
Quote by Basscooker
As far as the amp situation, you really should put some serious thought into it. You simply WON'T cut it in a rock band situation with anything smaller than a 10" speaker. I say 100 watts minimum, but with a larger speaker, you can sneak by with less power. Just remember that when it comes to amplifying a bass: cone area is key. 100 watts through a 10 is NOT the same as that same 100 watts through 2-15's. Ask any experienced bass player what they use with their band. I bet few if any go less than 250 watts and 2x10.


Few unless using FOH support get by with a 2x10.
Cone area, voice coil diameter have to come into consideration when stepping up from 2x10 to 2x15.
Producing low frequencies is a different ball game to guitar frequencies and requires more watts to produce those frequencies cleanly.
I gig with a 5 string bass into an Ashdown RPM1 preamp then into a 450 watt powered cab into a 15" 450 watt Neo speaker.
I'm never short on output and if need be I can add a 2x10 cab.

PS my first gig was in 1962, I build my own speaker cabs and have done for many years.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn