guitar/bass95
Banned
Join date: May 2010
3,041 IQ
#1
I really want to get rid of my Ibanez, since even though it is a reliable and overall nice guitar it doesn't fit my style anymore, with the wizard neck and the locking trem. I do really like fenders, both strats and teles, so I figured that the Fender Blacktop would be a fitting instrument for a good price.

So, I ran into one by accident today at the music store (I wanted to try out a few gibsons), and naturally tried it. It had the comfy strat neck and a cool look, but with one problem: gloss neck. My hands stuck to it like glue, and the summer heat doesn't help.

Now I need a new guitar to save for. I really didn't like the blacktop neck, so that isn't my goal anymore, gloss necks are the bane of my existence. Here's the usual:

Necessary specs: Humbuckers, no locking trem, 6 strings, solid body and apparently no gloss neck.
Preferred specs: 25,5 inch scale, fixed bridge, lightweight.
Genres: Based on metal and rock, but versatile with much room for experimentation.
Budget: Somewhere around 600-800 euros would be ideal.
Location: Finland, I'm okay with online shopping and shipping.
Both used and new are fine

I like fender necks most, and I also tried an SG today and it had a nice neck too. I play through a Peavey 6505+112.

Thanks for your opinions
Last edited by guitar/bass95 at Jul 30, 2014,
guitar/bass95
Banned
Join date: May 2010
3,041 IQ
#3
Oh yes, the lovely Reverends The Bayonet and the Warhawk RT are so beautiful. I'm not sure how it works if I order from the states, but if I find one used here in europe I might seriously consider it. Thanks for reminding me that these exist
guitar/bass95
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Join date: May 2010
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#5
Quote by Duv
I had a gloss neck on a Jag I once had, and with a bit of wet sanding I got it nice and satin-ey...


But I really don't want to sand the neck of my next guitar, if I'm going to spend a lot of my money on a single, reliable guitar I'd rather not start messing with it right away. I appreciate the idea, but it's not what I'm looking for right new.
joshpasson
Registered User
Join date: Jun 2005
118 IQ
#6
Guitar tech here: all necks, glossed or not, get sticky. some 1000 grit, working your way up to 2000/2.5K grit is gonna get a satin'y look, but smooth as melted butter. I treat all of my necks this way, and when a customer requests the service, it's like I handed them a new instrument.

just my two cents.
Multi-Instrumentalists FTW!!!
T00DEEPBLUE
Boba FRETT
Join date: Oct 2010
2,246 IQ
#7
Quote by guitar/bass95
But I really don't want to sand the neck of my next guitar, if I'm going to spend a lot of my money on a single, reliable guitar I'd rather not start messing with it right away. I appreciate the idea, but it's not what I'm looking for right new.

Why not? Satinizing a neck is such an incredibly easy thing to do and it takes no time at all. If the Blacktop ticks all the other boxes, then I think ruling it out just because the neck is finished in gloss would be a mistake. It's just too easy to fix, to not be.

It would be like ruling a guitar out just because the string nut action is a bit high, when that's something that can be easily fixed.

It's not really going to devalue the guitar either because the satin finish will eventually wear off with play and effectively the neck will eventually become glossy again. Just as it does with any guitar that has a satin finish which gets played a lot.
Regarding the furry fandom from the man himself:
Quote by Axelfox
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Jul 30, 2014,
dannyalcatraz
Black Cherry Jello
Join date: Dec 2008
3,265 IQ
#8
Quote by guitar/bass95
Oh yes, the lovely Reverends The Bayonet and the Warhawk RT are so beautiful. I'm not sure how it works if I order from the states, but if I find one used here in europe I might seriously consider it. Thanks for reminding me that these exist

JustRooster is stealing my thunder!

To follow up, there are some European retailers who sell Revs, including at least 1 in Finland.

http://www.reverendguitars.com/dealers-2/

You might also check eBay (I know, I know) and Reverb for used models. I find a lot of decent to good deals on them on both sites, and some of the sellers will ship internationally.

Bonus tip: there's a few older Reverends that were made in the USA* on those sites right now, typically going for @$900-1800. Those are some sweet, fine axes if you find one in your budget.


* as opposed to the current production, which, while excellent, are all made in S. Korea (if that matters to you).
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!


alhaq369
It is very impotent to success a business.
guitar/bass95
Banned
Join date: May 2010
3,041 IQ
#9
Quote by joshpasson
Guitar tech here: all necks, glossed or not, get sticky. some 1000 grit, working your way up to 2000/2.5K grit is gonna get a satin'y look, but smooth as melted butter. I treat all of my necks this way, and when a customer requests the service, it's like I handed them a new instrument.

just my two cents.


Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Why not? Satinizing a neck is such an incredibly easy thing to do and it takes no time at all. If the Blacktop ticks all the other boxes, then I think ruling it out just because the neck is finished in gloss would be a mistake. It's just too easy to fix, to not be.

It would be like ruling a guitar out just because the string nut action is a bit high, when that's something that can be easily fixed.


Thanks for the tips, I might consider it then. But trust me, I'd rather not do anything related to carpentry, and I don't want to pay extra for a tech. But well, I will think about it.

Quote by dannyalcatraz
JustRooster is stealing my thunder!

To follow up, there are some European retailers who sell Revs, including at least 1 in Finland.

http://www.reverendguitars.com/dealers-2/

You might also check eBay (I know, I know) and Reverb for used models. I find a lot of decent to good deals on them on both sites, and some of the sellers will ship internationally.

Bonus tip: there's a few older Reverends that were made in the USA* on those sites right now, typically going for @$900-1800. Those are some sweet, fine axes if you find one in your budget.


* as opposed to the current production, which, while excellent, are all made in S. Korea (if that matters to you).


I didn't know that, thanks And nothing against ebay, they have some great deals there, and so does reverb. Thanks for the heads up too
T00DEEPBLUE
Boba FRETT
Join date: Oct 2010
2,246 IQ
#10
Quote by guitar/bass95
Thanks for the tips, I might consider it then. But trust me, I'd rather not do anything related to carpentry, and I don't want to pay extra for a tech. But well, I will think about it.

Just take a piece of 800 grit sandpaper, put a couple of pieces of tape around the area of the neck you want to be satin, and rub the whole area evenly until you get the feel you desire. It's that simple. You really cannot mess it up.

You could use progressively finer grits if you wanted. But for me, a single sheet of 800 is fine.
Regarding the furry fandom from the man himself:
Quote by Axelfox
Please understand how little we as a community care
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Jul 30, 2014,
guitar/bass95
Banned
Join date: May 2010
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#11
Okay, I will definitely consider it, but I really don't feel comfortable with it. I can mess up a whole lot of unmessuppable things when it comes to woodworks. But I really appreciate the tips on how to do it, I know that I have to learn stuff like that in some point of my life, but I'd rather do it with a backup first, not my only instrument.
ryanbwags
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2010
510 IQ
#12
Don't be too worried about screwing anything up. You aren't going to take off too much wood with anything above 800 grit paper. You shouldn't even get all the way through the gloss coat on the neck. A couple passes with barely any pressure will satin up the neck in no time.
I don't know if you can watch this video in Finland, but this is basically what we are talking about.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dxGz6IZ9BFI

I personally wouldn't use the abrasive pads, though.
Harmony: Stratocaster
Alvarez: F-200
Schecter: Omen 6
Fender: BXR-60
Dean: Metalman Z Bass (Betty)
Egnator: Tweaker 15
Pearl: Maximum
ESP/LTD: EXP-300
Custom: Harley Quinn Bass
Custom: TK-421 Explorer
A steadily growing supply of pedals
Last edited by ryanbwags at Jul 30, 2014,
guitar/bass95
Banned
Join date: May 2010
3,041 IQ
#13
I can, thanks you all do a good job of convincing someone though if you're sure that I cannot grind the back of the neck off, maybe I'll just stay with my plans and satin the neck up. But I have to say the the reverends caught my attention too... well, I believe that there is no such thing as too much good options
jfreund
Registered User
Join date: Feb 2012
114 IQ
#14
Just got rid of my Blacktop Strat. Moved up to a Les Paul Studio Deluxe II 60 neck.
Much happier now
guitar/bass95
Banned
Join date: May 2010
3,041 IQ
#15
Quote by jfreund
Just got rid of my Blacktop Strat. Moved up to a Les Paul Studio Deluxe II 60 neck.
Much happier now


Well, we're not the same person funny though, I tried an LP studio on the same trip to the store, and I loved it. But I'm still not sure how I feel about the neck, it might not work for me.
dannyalcatraz
Black Cherry Jello
Join date: Dec 2008
3,265 IQ
#16
Hagstrom guitars- pretty good rep- might also have some good options, though they're a bit more conventional in appearance than my beloved Reverends.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!


alhaq369
It is very impotent to success a business.
guitar/bass95
Banned
Join date: May 2010
3,041 IQ
#17
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Hagstrom guitars- pretty good rep- might also have some good options, though they're a bit more conventional in appearance than my beloved Reverends.


Yeah, they did catch my attention by making LP's with a 25,5'' neck. I'm not sure if I can try one myself which is always a downside, but they're not rare or anything so a store might well have them in stock somewhere.
the_bi99man
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2006
2,035 IQ
#18
Try out some Schecters. They've got great guitars in that price range. Just go to a store that carries them and play some. You'll probably be impressed.
dannyalcatraz
Black Cherry Jello
Join date: Dec 2008
3,265 IQ
#19
Quote by guitar/bass95
Yeah, they did catch my attention by making LP's with a 25,5'' neck. I'm not sure if I can try one myself which is always a downside, but they're not rare or anything so a store might well have them in stock somewhere.

I've checked out a couple of used Hagstroms, and was impressed with the feel of them. Didn't have a chance to plug in, though. I know the Zappas are BIG fans of them, though.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!


alhaq369
It is very impotent to success a business.
guitar/bass95
Banned
Join date: May 2010
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#20
I've heard that Schecters have a really fat neck, so I'm a bit skeptical, but if I can find one I'll try it.

I checked the Hagström dealers, and the closest one is a two hour drive away. If I have some other business there, I'll check them out at the same time.
T00DEEPBLUE
Boba FRETT
Join date: Oct 2010
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#21
Quote by guitar/bass95
I've heard that Schecters have a really fat neck, so I'm a bit skeptical, but if I can find one I'll try it.

They're not. They're average. They just seem thick from the perspective of kids that have played nothing but Wizard III necks their whole life.
Regarding the furry fandom from the man himself:
Quote by Axelfox
Please understand how little we as a community care
Acϵ♠
UG Board King
Join date: Apr 2006
2,050 IQ
#22
I've sanded down every neck i've ever owned lol. I hate glossy sticky necks too, at least as much as you hate them, and literally 3 minutes with sandpaper fixes the problem altogether. Dont be so close-minded about it, if you ask me it's silly to give up the guitar you really want because you cant be arsed to put a little love into it. we're talking about a few minutes of work here, it's not like it's going to take you hours of work or tons of money.
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guitar/bass95
Banned
Join date: May 2010
3,041 IQ
#23
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
They're not. They're average. They just seem thick from the perspective of kids that have played nothing but Wizard III necks their whole life.


Okay, then there shouldn't be a problem.

Quote by Acϵ♠
I've sanded down every neck i've ever owned lol. I hate glossy sticky necks too, at least as much as you hate them, and literally 3 minutes with sandpaper fixes the problem altogether. Dont be so close-minded about it, if you ask me it's silly to give up the guitar you really want because you cant be arsed to put a little love into it. we're talking about a few minutes of work here, it's not like it's going to take you hours of work or tons of money.


It's not about me having to work, it's about my inherent ability of destroying any wood-based material by botched attempts of carpentry. But since there seems to be a zero margin for error, I might try it. Just don't make it sound like I'm too lazy to do it since that isn't really the case, I'm genuinely afraid that I'd screw the whole thing up.
T00DEEPBLUE
Boba FRETT
Join date: Oct 2010
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#24
Quote by guitar/bass95

It's not about me having to work, it's about my inherent ability of destroying any wood-based material by botched attempts of carpentry. But since there seems to be a zero margin for error, I might try it. Just don't make it sound like I'm too lazy to do it since that isn't really the case, I'm genuinely afraid that I'd screw the whole thing up.

Sanding a neck to a satin finish is not woodwork. All you're doing is putting fine, shallow scratches into the clearcoat of the finish. The only way you could possibly make a mistake, is if you tape the area of the neck to be sanded, but then sand the whole body down instead.

If you have half a braincell, you can do this. There is nothing to be scared of. Nada. Zero.
Regarding the furry fandom from the man himself:
Quote by Axelfox
Please understand how little we as a community care
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Jul 31, 2014,
guitar/bass95
Banned
Join date: May 2010
3,041 IQ
#25
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Sanding a neck to a satin finish is not woodwork. All you're doing is putting fine, shallow scratches into the clearcoat of the finish. The only way you could possibly make a mistake, is if you tape the area of the neck to be sanded, but then sand the whole body down instead.

If you have half a braincell, you can do this. There is nothing to be scared of. Nada. Zero.


Okay okay I believe you. Some of you said that it's a useful thing to do with every guitar, would it make a difference if I sanded my Ibanez for practice? I mean, even if it already has a satin neck.
T00DEEPBLUE
Boba FRETT
Join date: Oct 2010
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#26
It wouldn't do any harm.
Regarding the furry fandom from the man himself:
Quote by Axelfox
Please understand how little we as a community care
guitar/bass95
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#27
Okay, might give it a go. Thanks for all the help everyone, I'll try to find some Reverends, Schecters and Hagströms to try out too.
dspellman
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2012
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#28
Quote by guitar/bass95

It's not about me having to work, it's about my inherent ability of destroying any wood-based material by botched attempts of carpentry. But since there seems to be a zero margin for error, I might try it. Just don't make it sound like I'm too lazy to do it since that isn't really the case, I'm genuinely afraid that I'd screw the whole thing up.


The reason newbs do this is that they don't want to put up with the stickiness for the first few months. Playing it in will eventually eliminate the stickiness all by itself (unless you buy something like a Gibson with that crap "traditional" nitrocellulose lacquer finish), and for the same reasons that you lightly sand the finish (the green Scotchbrite pads seem to be a favorite over sandpaper and 0000 steel wool these days). As you play, over time you introduce microscratches, and that reduces the surface tension (think gecko feet) that keeps you from sliding.

An additional factor here is technique and finger strength. The lighter your fretting hand grips, the less likely you are to stick. I'm usually only touching the back of the neck with a small portion of the pad of my thumb. If you're a thumb wrapper, if you're an occasional player, or if you have small, weak or arthritic hands, you're more likely to be worried about the neck being sticky.