#1
I was messing around with a couple of modes/scales and usually I am able to guess pretty accurately on what I am playing. I decided raise the third to a major in Aelion, but I can't figure out what scale it becomes. I'd really like to know the name for it if there is a proper name. Thanks
#3
Well, (G A B C D D# F) spells out C Melodic Minor. My knowledge isn't deep enough to know if there's a name for it with G as the tonic, though.
#4
Quote by MrAdrift
I was messing around with a couple of modes/scales and usually I am able to guess pretty accurately on what I am playing. I decided raise the third to a major in Aelion, but I can't figure out what scale it becomes. I'd really like to know the name for it if there is a proper name. Thanks



OK so, the thing is, when you change the third, it's not minor any more.

But you have a b6 and b7 still.

b7 with a major 3rd would indicate Mixolydian

I guess if you want to name it Mixolydian b6?

So... what can you do with it, what chords are you going to use over it? a 7b13?

And to the poster above: it would be G A B C D Eb F. Each note degree has a different letter of the alphabet. A Melodic Minor would be b3 6 and 7 (unless you are descending...traditionally) What you spelled is not melodic minor at all. but kudos for trying to help If it was starting on C it would be, C melodic minor. But on G, even though it has the notes of such, it's not melodic minor because the interval profile starts from G.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jul 31, 2014,
#5
Yeah, I didn't word that very well. I was trying to say that the collective group of notes formed C melodic minor, that's why I went on to say I didn't know what it would be called with G as the root.

About the D D# I'm just gonna chalk that up to me being tired
#6
I'm not exactly sure what it's called, however if I use a random word generator to name the scale it should have the same effect on your music skill so here goes:

Superinducement scale
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#7
Quote by macashmack
Knowing the name of that series of notes will do nothing for you as a musician.


It will help you explain it faster to others if there is a commonly used name.

Edit: ^but if there isn't one, don't just make up one though lol

And I would refer to it as a major scale with a b6 and b7, as it's now major with the inclusion of the nat. 3rd.
Last edited by MapOfYourHead at Jul 31, 2014,
#8
Usually you would refer to the product it produces harmonically, and then just mention any non chord tones. There isn't really a need to name the "scale".
#9
You might choose this scale if you were playing over an "extended plagal cadence" which is iv-I or Cm - G.
#11
Quote by MrAdrift
I was messing around with a couple of modes/scales and usually I am able to guess pretty accurately on what I am playing. I decided raise the third to a major in Aelion, but I can't figure out what scale it becomes. I'd really like to know the name for it if there is a proper name. Thanks

Who cares what it's named?! The important thing is, what key is it in?

Quote by Gman can
Mixolydian b6 would be the most common name for it, for communication purposes.

Or you could throw this kind of silly nonsense right out the window and say it's a major scale with a b6 & b7. And then, you could specify whether the song/piece is major or minor -- since the tonality of the song/piece/riff/progression matters a hell of a lot more than the damn name of a scale used.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Jul 31, 2014,
#12
I do say! BEGONE THY LABELS OF ANTIQUITY! BEGONE THY CONCEPT OF THEORETICAL PREJUDICE! BRING FORTH YE INSTRUMENTS AND CREATIVE BEING THUSLY DEVELOPING SOUNDS WHICH THY MORTAL EARS HATH NOT YET HEARD!

Why use keys? Just tell me what it sounds like based on your aural experience.
#13
Quote by Morphogenesis26
I do say! BEGONE THY LABELS OF ANTIQUITY! BEGONE THY CONCEPT OF THEORETICAL PREJUDICE! BRING FORTH YE INSTRUMENTS AND CREATIVE BEING THUSLY DEVELOPING SOUNDS WHICH THY MORTAL EARS HATH NOT YET HEARD!

Why use keys? Just tell me what it sounds like based on your aural experience.



If we did this, it'd become more of a mess than the people who groan about genre labels.

p1: "Why does Metal/Hardcore/Electronic have so many genres?!"
p2: "So, when I say 'Funeral Doom', other people know what I'm talking about?"
p1: "BUT WHY?! FUNERAL DOOM SOUNDS STUPID! ISN'T IT JUST METAL?!"
p2: /facepalm
#14
Some people would call the G minor scale with a major third degree the G Aeolian Dominant scale but whoop dee doo.
You might could use some double modals.
#15
Quote by AETHERA
Some people would call the G minor scale with a major third degree the G Aeolian Dominant scale but whoop dee doo.

I think the important part of this is the bolded. What I mean is, assuming that's the correct name (I don't give a shit if it is or not, honestly), what does that do for your musical skills? Knowing the "name" of a scale doesn't allow you to use that scale or otherwise enhance your playing or composition.
#17
I'd say G minor with accidentals. I'd argue that raising the Bb to a Bnaturalsign would indicate a modulation to C minor, though it's impossible to say without context.

Knowing the name of it won't help you though. You can get by just fine by saying 'G minor with accidentals' or 'modulation to [INSERT KEY HERE].'
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#18
We don't know the context so it's hard to name the scale. It may be that those accidentals are used over a specific chord and actually don't belong to the scale. But it's hard to tell without context.

For example the intro melody of "Under a Glass Moon" uses this "scale". But it's actually just playing chord tones that happen to fit this scale. The chord progression goes like F# - E - D - F#(sus4 - F#). You need to see the context. In this case I would just call the b7 and b6 accidentals.

You shouldn't just pick all the note of a song and build a scale - or that's just pointless because it doesn't tell anything about how the notes are used. In the Dream Theater song you can see how the major third is used over the I chord, the b7 is used over the bVII chord and the b6 is used over the bVI chord.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Aug 2, 2014,
#19
Quick shortcut to figuring out how to use goofy scales: starting on the root note, rearrange the scale in thirds.

G A B C D Eb F G = G B D F A C Eb G

Look at the first four notes and what chord do you see spelled? That's what chord you'd use this scale over.
#20
Yeah, I'd say it's Mixolydian b13 (or b6, depending on how you look at it) - it's the fifth mode of Melodic Minor.
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#21
Quote by MaggaraMarine
In the Dream Theater song you can see how the major third is used over the I chord, the b7 is used over the bVII chord and the b6 is used over the bVI chord.

See, that is useful!
#22
Hmmm, finding a name for it would help to convey it to someone else. Just because the guy wants a name for it does not mean he may or may not be working on trying to figure out its usage in the interim. Also, the help of some people have made it possible to do just that - finding a use.