#1
Hey there! I play guitar in a modern metal band and am currently looking around for a live mic for my cab and a set of IEM so that I can hear everything around me a bit clearer.

I currently play out of a line 6pod hd pro + peavey classic 120 power amp through a a custom 2x12 omega cab (loaded with 1 eminence swamp Thang and 1 eminence wizard)

For the mic, (considering buying two mics since my cab has two different speakers. Please tell me what you guys think. If I should stick to one MIC, I will likely mic the swamp thang)

For now I've been thinking of sticking to an sm57 just to play it safe, but I'd like to know if anyone else has had any experience with other mics that might sound better and why. I'm looking for something that can maintain that clarity but still sound punchy and crisp through a decent PA.

As for the iems, I'm not really sure what to look for to be honest. If anyone can please share some experiences they've had with good/bad iems, I would really appreciate it. Or if anyone knows about a 5 person set for the whole band, that would be pretty awesome.

Thanks so much and I really appreciate whatever help I can get!
#2
Personally I would just run the Pod direct and leave the amp home. If you must mic it, an SM57, Sennheiser e906 or similar but mic placement is pretty critical and results in a much longer setup time to get right. If you were running through a vintage Tweed Deluxe, by all means mic it. Since you are already using a Pod, trust the Pod. YMMV
http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/aug07/articles/guitaramprecording.htm

IEMs are about as personal as headphones so one persons trash is another's treasure. I have been using the Shure E2 for a long time and they sound good but are not super comfortable. I only use them for certain venues and don't get too in love with them. Getting a custom molded fit makes a huge difference in comfort and isolation. You will probably want separate transmitters with multiple mixes so you can get a little more guitar in your ears.

Getting a really good mic placement and then a good IEM monitor mix might add 30-60 minutes to your gig setup time so plan ahead. Most players wait until they have a full sound crew with techs to worry about mic placement and IEM mixes so they can just focus on their music.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Jul 31, 2014,
#3
It depends on your budget.

If you have the money for a 441, get a 441.
If you have the money for a 421, get a 421.
If you have the money for an SM57, get an SM57.

That is, if you can't stand gigging without an amp.

I personally would make my best to stand it, and follow cajundaddy's advice of using the pod alone.

Also why would you mic both speakers AND use the pod?
I get you'd like to have a full sound, but a couple different sounds alone will do.
Then you can use other sorts of gimmicks to sound fuller, but picking up the sound from two different speakers being fed from the same amp is gonna make you sound muddy unless you have a good sound guy, and that's not a thing I would count on unless you tour with your trusted sound guy.

As for the IEM, again that greatly depends on your budget.

MDR 7550, Audio Technica M2, Sennheiser EW300...
Name's Luca.

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#4
I'm not using just the pod because the other guitarist I'm working with atm has a 2x12 stack setup as well. Being that most venues ha e different pa systems and such, I'd rather not throw off that balance and possibly have one of us drowning out the other in the mix. When I tried this setup in a rehearsal studio and at our other guitarist' house, I felt like I had to do a lot of work to match our tones so that no one was drowning the other and that I absolutely couldn't count on this being consistent when it comes to traveling and playing different venues. I had the cab already from my previous setup and the power amp wasn't expensive so I figured that I would just stick to this.
#5
Split your pod signal and send 1 to your amp and the other to the PA. Much easier to set up and consistently control your tone than adding 2 mics. From your posts I am guessing you have a bit of guitarist volume wars and stage levels might already be really loud. Wear ear plugs if not IEMs to protect your ears. Once they are gone, they're gone.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Jul 31, 2014,
#6
Now the issue with splitting my signal is that the pod has two different modes. A studio mode and what's basically a live mode which have drastic effects on the tone. Running through my cab, I turn off cab simulation on the pod because I find that it kinda takes away from what have. That alone running into the PA will cause an issue unless I happen to get my hands on a torpedo live or another digital load box for impulse responses. However, I find that the live mode still sounds empty when it's run through frfr speakers. Unless I can somehow split my output so that one signal is the live mode and the other is in studio/direct.
#7
Quote by nor.omar.9
I'm not using just the pod because the other guitarist I'm working with atm has a 2x12 stack setup as well.


I'd use the pod alone as well. Dump the 2x12 and amp and pick up a full-range powered speaker. Something like a Carvin PM15A ($299) or equivalent (and no, a Mackie Thump is not equivalent). http://www.carvinguitars.com/products/PM15A

400W RMS (as opposed to "peak" or "program"). 37 lbs. Because it's a full-range flat response-style speaker, it's pretty much a PA-type speaker.



There's a mini-mixer on the back which makes it handy for emergencies or for playing your CD between sets:



Because of its design and form factor, you can put it up on a speaker stand for better projection. It's easier to cart around. It can also lay down at an angle and work as your personal monitor, etc. This eliminates re-doing your patches for direct into a PA system, it gives you plenty of "balance" to work with another 2x12 player, and likely more bottom end (if you want it) than your 2x12 is currently providing. It eliminates the whole miking issue (you can run direct to a PA *and* to this thing, or have them give you a monitor feed into this, if you prefer, so that the rest of the band can hear you).

And so on.
#8
Quote by nor.omar.9
Now the issue with splitting my signal is that the pod has two different modes. A studio mode and what's basically a live mode which have drastic effects on the tone. Running through my cab, I turn off cab simulation on the pod because I find that it kinda takes away from what have. That alone running into the PA will cause an issue unless I happen to get my hands on a torpedo live or another digital load box for impulse responses. However, I find that the live mode still sounds empty when it's run through frfr speakers. Unless I can somehow split my output so that one signal is the live mode and the other is in studio/direct.


You don't need a digital *load* box. The cab simulations in the Pod are generally adequate, and you can run two different rigs within the Pod itself. That means that you can run a cab mode for output to the PA and a non-cab node for output to your existing amp. Just pan each rig hard right or hard left, depending on which output you're going to take to your existing rig and which will go to the PA.

That said, I'd eliminate the 2x12 and amp altogether and go with the FRFR, above. If you've got any extra money left over, look at the Torpedo C.A.B. I've begun to run that instead of the cab simulations in the Pod (saves me some DSP as well); the IRs in that thing are very very good (and you can load in others). It's a pedal, but it's also MIDI capable, so you can store MIDI in your presets and activate both the Pod and the C.A.B. with a single stomp (assuming an FBV Shortboard or Express).
#10
BTW -- "hearing everything around you a bit clearer" is a good reason to have IEMs, but you really want to reduce stage volume (and that includes your drums). At one point we went to a nearly quiet stage (electronic drums, everything else DI). The benefit (aside from reducing tinnitus likelihood) is that you don't have all that extraneous noise being picked up in the vocal mikes, where it's almost impossible to filter out. That's the key to greater clarity, both in your ears and coming out of the PA. A drummer change screwed that up, but even then we surrounded him with plexiglas and pointed some small monitors at his head.
#12
My band has more of an advanced set up (at least in the sense that we bring our own personal monitor board with our IEM, wirelesses, and such because we run our own sound A LOT) but I just DI my amp to our monitor mix, and presto, I have my own personal mix of everything i need. it helps a LOT and when your in a band that moves constantly it's nice to always be able to hear whats going on. We also go the whole 9 and have custom molds. We can also run our cabs either mic'd or DI whether we do our own sound or not, and I still ahve complete control of whats in my head.
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#13
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I still ahve complete control of whats in my head.


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