#1
So I am trying to get my setup louder and I haven't really been using monitors in the past. I am wondering if I ran a distortion pedal into one of the channels if it would work like a clean channel on an amp. I am guessing it would not work well but if it would it might be better than cranking up my amp. This is just for playing at a jam session with our band. If not I will have to run the line out on my amp to a monitor.

Thanks
Raconteurs Fan Guy
#2
What you really need is a new amp.
Also possibly a new cab.

The thing would work if the monitors were active but it would sound pretty damn bad - guitar speakers color the sound a lot, and not having that coloration results in a fairly funny sounds when clean and plain bad when distorted.

Your amp and your cab might be the problem.
What amp and what cab do you have?
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#3
Quote by COREYTAYLOR721
So I am trying to get my setup louder and I haven't really been using monitors in the past. I am wondering if I ran a distortion pedal into one of the channels if it would work like a clean channel on an amp. I am guessing it would not work well but if it would it might be better than cranking up my amp. This is just for playing at a jam session with our band. If not I will have to run the line out on my amp to a monitor.


Consider running a modeler (I use a Pod, but there are tons of options out there). That (or any other preamp) can easily be run into the mixer, and a lot of bands here in LA have been doing that. You've got way more power available in the PA system (usually) than in your personal amp. And it's a LOT lighter weight carting around a Pod than an amp.
#4
The guitar cabinet is a critical part of shaping your tone. You can get a cab simulator, of which a crude implementation (high pass filter) may be part of your amp's line out circuit. You can also get a mic to feed your mixer/PA from your amp's cab. If you like your amp, but it just isn't loud enough the mic is my suggestion. But try the line out for yourself. It might be fine.
#5
Basically yes but if the result would be anything usable that is a different story. Monitors are full-range and they aim to reproduce everything from lows (except for subwoofer territory) to highest highs. What this means is that when you kick in distortion you hear everything uncolored and every nasty treble frequency noise it brings. What you hear is similar to white noise, very unpleasant and piercing. Simply put it sounds horrible.


Guitar cabinets, or the speakers actually, only play a set range of frequency, from upper bass to upper midrange/lower treble, and rest is rolled off fast. And even those frequencies that are played are far from flat, actually its really colored with dips and hills. This makes the distortion sound pleasing.

So you would really need some kind of cabinet simulation or impulse response after the distortion pedal. Buy a Pod or such modeler with different models and cabinet simulations. Those you can plug directly into PA system or monitors and get good results.

ESP LTD F-50 + Tonezone
Cort EVL-Z4 + X2N
Cort EVL-K47B

Marshall Valvestate 8100
Randall RG1503
Bugera 333
Peavey Rockmaster preamp

Line6 Pod X3
Last edited by MaaZeus at Jul 31, 2014,