#1
I'm playing my ESP H-1001 through Focusrite Scarlett 2i4.
Currently using some 2.1 sound system made by Creative.
I'm not sure if its my tone setting sucks or its the speakers.
the sound that come out doesn't sound good.

Is it time to get a pair of monitor speakers ?
Ibanez S570B WH
Peavey vypyr 30
Focusrite Scarlett 2i4
#2
A few questions:

1) What is your signal chain? are you recording with a mic from your amp or are you using amp simulators in your DAW? or any other set up like a POD etc.

2) How long have you had the speakers for? Do commercial recordings sounds good on them?

- If you've had the speakers for a long time you can generally gauge their frequency response without needing professional monitors - so long as you cross reference on different speakers and headphones (after all most people listen to their music on fairly average speakers)

3) How are your speakers positioned and what sort of room are they in?

- Raising them off the floor or off a desk or table can improve the sound so they're at ear level, also removing them from corners of the room can help build of energy from lower frequencies. The room might be worth looking at as well, generally reflective surfaces like wooden flooring and bare walls can effect the sound a lot. A room with thick carpet and furnishings can prevent the sound from bouncing round and creating reflections which exaggerate some frequencies.


I personally use a pair of KRK RP6 monitors, they're quite flattering for a lot of mixes, but from using the same monitors for over 5 years I know the low response is a little exaggerated and the mids aren't as well defined as they could be, in knowing this I can compensate my mix when I'm working and then cross reference with headphones and other speakers I have lying around to check its right.

hope this has been helpful
#3
Quote by EatShreddies
If you've had the speakers for a long time you can generally gauge their frequency response without needing professional monitors - so long as you cross reference on different speakers and headphones (after all most people listen to their music on fairly average speakers)
I respectfully disagree - the frequency response isn't the only reason why to get monitor speakers.
Clarity is important, bass response (extension) is important...
Also it's helpful to know how stuff would sound on a high quality hi-fi system.

It's up to you to decide if a pair of nice monitor's worth the price, and a pair of monitors worth buying won't come that cheap.

If you mostly/only want to play guitar keep the speakers and practice with mixing and sound design, also if you're using guitar rig and/or amplitube ditch them, or at least ditch the cab simulation in favor of something even half decent sounding.
I personally think they suck, but people repeatedly told me the problem's the cab simulation, so if you don't want to ditch them completely have a look at some LeCab or similar.

If you want to mix though, you're a bit experienced already, and you really are interested in keeping up with the thing, I'd get a pair of nice monitors.
Yamy HS8's or Equator D8's if ya ask me.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
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#4
I don't mean frequency response in the literal sense of "these monitors have a flat response between 30hz and 18000kh". I mean more in the reactive sense of getting a feel for how different things sound on particular monitors, for example I know my KRK's are bass heavy and lack in mids somewhat, so I check on a pair of bluetooth speakers I have which exaggerate the mid frequencies and check with different headphones I have too.

I've been thinking of upgrading from my KRK's for a while now, they feel a lot like old friends considering how long I've had them for haha, would love to get a pair of Genelecs but funds are lacking these days
#5
Quote by EatShreddies
A few questions:

1) What is your signal chain? are you recording with a mic from your amp or are you using amp simulators in your DAW? or any other set up like a POD etc.

2) How long have you had the speakers for? Do commercial recordings sounds good on them?

- If you've had the speakers for a long time you can generally gauge their frequency response without needing professional monitors - so long as you cross reference on different speakers and headphones (after all most people listen to their music on fairly average speakers)

3) How are your speakers positioned and what sort of room are they in?

- Raising them off the floor or off a desk or table can improve the sound so they're at ear level, also removing them from corners of the room can help build of energy from lower frequencies. The room might be worth looking at as well, generally reflective surfaces like wooden flooring and bare walls can effect the sound a lot. A room with thick carpet and furnishings can prevent the sound from bouncing round and creating reflections which exaggerate some frequencies.


I personally use a pair of KRK RP6 monitors, they're quite flattering for a lot of mixes, but from using the same monitors for over 5 years I know the low response is a little exaggerated and the mids aren't as well defined as they could be, in knowing this I can compensate my mix when I'm working and then cross reference with headphones and other speakers I have lying around to check its right.

hope this has been helpful



I plug my guitar right in to the interface and use pugins on cubase to do effects.
I got this speaker from my cousin awhile ago i would say atleast 5 yrs now. and yes commercial recordings sound good on them (at least for me)
my speakers are pointing towad me right next to rmy computer monitors on the desk.
Ibanez S570B WH
Peavey vypyr 30
Focusrite Scarlett 2i4
#6
If professionally recorded music sounds good on your speakers but your guitar does not... It's not the speakers. Something else in your signal chain is causing the problem. Listen on quality headphones and if the guitar still sounds off, look upstream until you find it. Using very familiar reference tracks to compare your work is a great way to develop recording skill.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#7
Hey if you`re pluging your guitar directly into interface, you might consider getting a direct box, because di box turns your unbalanced signal from guitar to a balanced signal.

But you can only use it if your interface has XLR inputs.

With DI box the noise and distortion are kind of cancelled and the sound becomes fuller and much better.
#8
^ you didn't really get what DI boxes and audio interfaces do, nor how bal lines work.

DI boxes do two things: they turn the signal impedance down and they balance the signal.
That is helpful if you want to send a signal into an input far from the output, so you get less noise, and if you want to send a hi-z signal into an line input.

They are useless in this case though.
Audio interfaces already have hi-z inputs and you wouldn't need to place an audio interface far from the source when recording.

Also balanced lines can run on cables with TRS ends.

Look up "DI box" and "balanced line" on wikipedia for more info.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#9
Maybe I didn`t explain it right - my first language is not english..

BUT - I do use a DI box. How do i do it?

I plug my guitar into DI box. Then I plug the DI box into my interface (E-MU 1616m) into the XLR input.
Before I had the DI box I was connecting my guitar directly with 1/4" instrument cable (also into E-MU).

The difference in sound is quite obvious - without DI box there is a lot of noise and distortion, and the sound is not full...
#10
That's because the DI box's input is of higher quality than the interface's hi-z input.
Bal lines don't have anything to do with that, really.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#11
Hey, as you can see from the pics - this is one of the possible functions of the DI box - you insert your guitar or bass or whatever into DI box, and then plug it into the mixer.

I am definetely not sure how to explain it in technical terms, but I know from my own experience that it makes my sound completely different, much better with much less distortion (the unwanted distortion, the noise).

Look at the pics - the guitar goes into DI box, and from there the XLR cable is plugged into a mixer. If you don`t have a mixer, your interface acts as one, so basicly you get the same thing as if you had a mixer.

Just google "DI box and guitar" and you will find many charts of this kind of connections.
Attachments:
RADIAL+RDL+JDI-3.JPG
jdi-app-1-lrg.jpg
Last edited by Ante Škifić at Aug 13, 2014,
#12
A DI box works fine and is one way to get it done but certainly not the only way. An ADA interface with a high quality "instrument input" is as-good-or-better sound than the same guitar through a DI box.

I ALWAYS use a DI when playing acoustic live or recording through an analog mixer. When recording direct to an ADA interface I trust the "instrument input" that was designed to accept my instrument. For recording acoustic guitar, I get better results with a good mic than any direct method.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#13
Yeah, I guess different methods can get you to the same result, and that is perfectly fine. I definetely didn`t want to make it look like my way is the only one that is right...it`s just that it works for me, but there are multiple ways to get it done.
#14
You will not be able to play sound through both the internal monitor speakers on HDMI and sound card at the same time. Windows does not have the option to use multiple audio sources for audio output. You will have to choose one of them to be your primary audio output.

Also, I don't think you would lose any picture quality going from HDMI to DVI since it is just a monitor and not a 56 inch widescreen TV.
Last edited by hermanwaltz at Sep 4, 2014,