#1
So I mainly like to play my acoustic guitar in front of friends and family while I sing. I learned 'Learning To Fly' including the solo but it sounds ridiculous playing the solo because the rhythm stops because I'm the only guitarist. Any advice on how I can play a solo on my acoustic without really stopping the beat?
#2
Quote by GordonLightfoot
So I mainly like to play my acoustic guitar in front of friends and family while I sing. I learned 'Learning To Fly' including the solo but it sounds ridiculous playing the solo because the rhythm stops because I'm the only guitarist. Any advice on how I can play a solo on my acoustic without really stopping the beat?
Well dude, off the top of my head I'd say, either buy a battery powered looper and amp, or bring along another guitar player. (It's best if you find one that's willing to strum for protracted periods of time, in case your solo(s) run into overtime).

Another possibility is to scrap the recorded solo, and try working some of the song's melody notes into the strum pattern.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Aug 2, 2014,
#3
Arrange it so that you're playing some root notes from the chord progression while doing the solo.
#4
Don't even bother learning the solo note for note. If you want to spice your songs up, try learning the intro's note perfect, add some arpeggios. Just keep your audience interested.
Are you trying to entertain your friends or are you trying to show them how good your not.
Cheers
#5
Quote by tuxs
...[ ].... are you trying to show them how good your not.
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Last edited by Captaincranky at Aug 3, 2014,
#6
Correct Cranky. If I had a strong point it wasn't english.Cheers
#7
Like you said, playing the solo from a song when it's just you and an acoustic guitar doesn't work.

I fix this by not playing the solo. Shorten the song, if a bridge is needed strum your way through it to the next section (shorten this if it's a long solo you're removing from the song) and just get on with the next verse.

Sometimes it may work if you sing the melody of the solo (lots of Na Na Na's), but more often than not it's better to just cut that section out of the song when you're on your own.
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#8
Depends on how you're playing it, your level of talent, and your audience I think.

Are you playing fingerstyle or are you using a pick? Unless you're pretty talented with fingerstyle/pick combinations, this would be easiest to do if you played the whole song fingerstyle. Like somebody else said, you could arrange it so that you keep the structure of the background voice or chord progression and add some bits from the solo over it, so it's not an obvious solo. It'd just be bits of the solo layered over a continuation of the main theme.

Also depends on your audience though. If they aren't particularly musical and won't care about or appreciate the arrangement, I would just entirely leave it out because even if you pull it off well, it might still be useless
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