#1
Can any one explain this "blocked 4th" thing from the quote below???

It’s tough to imagine double-stops ever sounding as big as Ritchie Blackmore made them sound on this anthem from the 1972 Deep Purple album Machine Head. Blackmore made rock history by plugging his scalloped-fretboard Strat (set to the neck pickup) into a 200-watt Marshall and, rather than playing power chords on the two low strings, used blocked 4ths with the first diad comprised of D and G.

thanks
#3
Yup, just listen to "Smoke on the Water". The quote explains how he got the tone used in for example the intro of that song.
#4
Quote by cdgraves
It's just an unnecessarily fancy way of saying he played the riff with 4ths. Double-stop means fretting two strings at the time in a melody


fourths as in I-IV as in I-IV-V type of notation? Like D-E-F-G-A?

thanks
#5
Quote by fastforded
fourths as in I-IV as in I-IV-V type of notation? Like D-E-F-G-A?

thanks


He just played the root note and the perfect fourth at the same time as a double stops. If you pluck your guitars A and D strings simultaneously for example, you have achieved the same.
#6
Quote by fastforded
fourths as in I-IV as in I-IV-V type of notation? Like D-E-F-G-A?

thanks

No, 4ths are in:
 
e-------|
B-------|
G-------|
D-5-7-8-|
A-5-7-8-|
E-------|


You can look up the riff to "Smoke on the Water" yourself, but remember that Blackmore played it on the D & A strings. (There are tabs on UG, where it is played on the D & G strings. The notes are the same, but playing it that way wouldn't cause it to sound as "powerful".)

Interesting fact: Deep Purple thought of "Smoke on the Water" as a filler song. Became one of the best known riffs out there.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Aug 3, 2014,
#7
I hear the Smoke on the Water riff as inverted power chords and not as fourths. I mean, I think the "root note" of those diads is the higher note, not the lower note. It would sound pretty much the same if you just doubled the highest note an octave lower.

So if you played the riff with single notes, it would go like G-Bb-C, etc and not like D-F-G etc.

^ Actually that's not the way Ritchie played it. Just look at some live videos. Though he did play it in different positions.

In this video I see him playing it in two ways:

e-----------|
B-----------|
G-----------|
D----8-10---|
A-10-8-10---|
E-10--------|


e-----------|
B-----------|
G-0-3-5-----|
D-0-3-5-----|
A-----------|
E-----------|


Or I'm not sure if the first chord is actually the 5th fret of A and D strings instead of open D and G strings.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nkduiZt3HM0
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Aug 3, 2014,
#8
^ that's how i always imagined it. granted i'm not gonna sit and figure it out, but it sounds like the dude who wrote that is BSing hard. like he was trying to make "he played a different chord" sound so much more absurd and groundbreaking
#9
Quote by MaggaraMarine
I hear the Smoke on the Water riff as inverted power chords and not as fourths. I mean, I think the "root note" of those diads is the higher note, not the lower note. It would sound pretty much the same if you just doubled the highest note an octave lower.

So if you played the riff with single notes, it would go like G-Bb-C, etc and not like D-F-G etc.


I think you're right, they're inverted power chords. But as far as I'm concerned a fourth and an inverted power chord are the same thing. I know that the root note is different, but from a players standpoint there isn't any difference that I'm aware of.
#10
Quote by guitar/bass95
I think you're right, they're inverted power chords. But as far as I'm concerned a fourth and an inverted power chord are the same thing. I know that the root note is different, but from a players standpoint there isn't any difference that I'm aware of.


yeah and there's no difference between a 4 cylinder and a 6 cylinder engine to the driver, right?

at least until the fucker blows up and you don't know how to fix it

(sorry my truck literally caught on fire last week so i've been doing a lot of engine metaphors while i work on it)
#11
It's okay, you get the point through, but as you said there's no difference when you're driving. I know the difference between the fourth and the inverted power chord, but when you play it the shape is the same anyway, that's all I was saying anyway.

And sorry about your truck, is the repair going well?
#12
Quote by MaggaraMarine
I hear the Smoke on the Water riff as inverted power chords and not as fourths. I mean, I think the "root note" of those diads is the higher note, not the lower note. It would sound pretty much the same if you just doubled the highest note an octave lower.

So if you played the riff with single notes, it would go like G-Bb-C, etc and not like D-F-G etc.

The reason it sounds like this is because Roger Glover was playing the notes G, Bb, C, etc.

Actually that's not the way Ritchie played it. Just look at some live videos. Though he did play it in different positions.

The way he played it on record is how I said. Listen to the studio version.
#13
Quote by guitar/bass95

And sorry about your truck, is the repair going well?


i blew out my head gasket so it's at the shop now, praying the head isn't cracked so i can eat this month
#14
Quote by crazysam23_Atax

The way he played it on record is how I said. Listen to the studio version.


Litening to the studio version of Smoke on the Water is something I don't want to do, I'm not saying that it isn't an iconic song and all but tbh, it's also boring as shit. I guess I'll take your word


Quote by Hail
i blew out my head gasket so it's at the shop now, praying the head isn't cracked so i can eat this month



Is your job dependent on the truck? If so, that's a shitty situation
#15
Sure!

It is in fact a bit of stylized writing, and, I happen to agree with it's assessment.

These are diads... 4ths, played on the D and G strings. Sometimes you see it spelled "dyad".

Some people call this particular music grouping a "double stop" but it is also, very much a diad. Two notes played simultaneously.

I agree that these are 4ths. In fact, the first two notes D and G are played with the open 4th and 3rd strings. The term "blocked" may refer to the idea that the two notes in each part of the riff, are stacked or played in a symmetrical, or "block" form. For example after playing the opening two open strings the next part of the riff are played at the 3rd fret, for both notes.

-----------------
-----------------
--0---3---------
--0---3---------
-----------------
-----------------

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Aug 3, 2014,
#16
Quote by guitar/bass95
it's also boring as shit. I guess I'll take your word

If you can't take 5 minutes to listen, then why even bother discussing the topic?

Also, fuck your opinion that it's boring.
#17
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
The reason it sounds like this is because Roger Glover was playing the notes G, Bb, C, etc.


The way he played it on record is how I said. Listen to the studio version.

I would say that it would sound like G Bb C even if the bass wasn't playing. I have written many riffs that use inverted power chords and they always sound like inverted power chords.

Also, your tab of Smoke on the Water was wrong. I mean, it had G5 A5 and Bb5 chords.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#18
the relationship between 5ths and roots is far more prominent than that of 4ths and roots. functionally, you need heavy implication that it is the 4th/11th in context, or it'll default to sounding like an inversion