#1
I have an urge to write music lately but feel like my "toolkit" is very incomplete here. I mostly spend my time learning songs I like from tabs, rather than learning theory and stuff because I just play to relax and entertain myself.

Now I want to create some music what are some essentials things I should learn? Maybe a lot of music theory and scales/arpeggios?
#2
Learning music theory will give you the tools to know how to take next logical step when composing songs. Writing a song with only the knowledge you gain from tabs of your favorite songs will limit you to only what you've already played and happy accidents from fiddling with your guitar.
#3
A keyboard for me. Much simpler to compose on a keyboard because everything is in black and white... literally. Know the relative chords in your chosen key. Plan how you intend to lay out a song:
(V1 V2 C V3 C C B C C) for example. Take a whack at it. A whole lot of amazing musicians don't know jack about music theory. They trust their ears.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Aug 4, 2014,
#6
Quote by steven seagull
Ears


Exactly what I was going to say.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#7
I agree with all of the above especially learning some basic chord theory and getting good "ear" training. Start by learning a few songs (that do not have a lot of difficult changes) but do it "by ear" not by tabs or sheet music and as Cajundaddy says it's import to learn the basic relative chords for any key. If you are writing songs you need to be able to play the chords that are abstractly playing in your head. You need to be able to recognize that the sound you want as major or minor or whatever. Without the ability to "play by ear" it's difficult to locate what you want or as Chris said hope to stumble on a "happy accident". (I like that term.)
#8
To create a music Compositional techniques are used. writing musical notation, music theory, instrumentation, and handling musical ensembles (orchestration) are the useful skills involved in composition . improvisation, musical montage, preparing instruments, using non-traditional instruments, and other methods of sound production are the extended techniques in the music creation.
Last edited by richardsnelson at Aug 25, 2014,
#9
Just practice thinking of melodies and work out how to play them on the guitar. The only theory you really need is how to harmonise a melody.
#10
Quote by Jehannum
Just practice thinking of melodies and work out how to play them on the guitar. The only theory you really need is how to harmonise a melody.


Theory also helps with coming up with... you know... all the rest of the instrumentation.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#11
most important is some kind of instrument, you could also only use your voice like that bobby guy
#12
Quote by redd9
I have an urge to write music lately but feel like my "toolkit" is very incomplete here. I mostly spend my time learning songs I like from tabs, rather than learning theory and stuff because I just play to relax and entertain myself.

Now I want to create some music what are some essentials things I should learn? Maybe a lot of music theory and scales/arpeggios?


1 - learn songs and solos by ear. This is absolutely necessary to bridge the gap between what you hear in your head and playing it on guitar ( or any other instrument).

2 - always improvise and play around on the instrument - practice inventing things. Have fun with it and do it everyday.

3- learn some theory : scales, chord progression theory etc. and analyse songs you already know to decipher what is going on and understand.

4 - record yourself improvising and listen back to it critically. Re-learn great improvised phrases so that they become part of your playing style. This is a great way to develop your own style.

5- practice improvising in your head.