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#1
I'm looking for a (reasonably) good condenser microphone for recording vocals and acoustic guitar. My budget is around £80, but i can stretch it a bit if the mic is really worth it. Obviously I'm looking for something that's the best possible value for the money. I won't be recording anything else with it apart from vocals and acoustic guitar. Also this is my first mic, so if there's anything important you think I should know about the topic then feel free to lecture me.

Also, I heard that the most important thing about recording is the room. There's only so far I can go with this, as all the music making gear is in my bedroom.

The room is around 2.5 x 3.5 metres (i'm guessing), but a lot of that space is taken up - there's little free space, mostly taken up by furniture, some music gear and a lot of other stuff like computer tv etc (I have no idea if this is important btw ). As for reflective surfaces, I have a carpet so I guess that's a start. Apart from the wardrobe, painting and desks covering some of the walls, they are mainly 'exposed' (one side being covered by posters). There's also a window.

I don't know anything about acoustics, I'm only guessing the sound waves bouncing off the reflective walls and into the mic can only be bad. I've read some tips for this, and I was wondering just how effective is 'hanging a thick blanket over a wall'? How important is soundproofing a room, and how badly does an untreated room affect the recording quality?
Guess I'm just asking for advice on what to do with the room to make the sound quality decent. We are renting out though, so anything like covering the walls with foam is out of the question.

So yeah, any advice? And will 'amateur soundproofing' make any difference, or is this something that has to be done properly, like in studios? Worst case scenario I'll just record the vocals in my wardrobe

EDIT: would this be useful at all? http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=UTeUeRxAS7M
Last edited by mickel_w at Aug 4, 2014,
#2
Do you have an audio interface? It's the device that converts your audio signal to digital, then delivers it to the computer by USB or Firewire. It would also supplyphantom power to the condensor mic.

Half-decent ones start at about $150, but you can find used ones cheaper. What DAW (recording software) are you planning on using?

Blankets can muffle some high reverb, but for a decent recording space, bass trapping is needed - its the build up of low-mid and bass waves that can muddy up recordings.
You cna't really 'soundproof' a room easily, unless you live in a basement! Recording in a closet is going to sound like ... well ... a closet.
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#3
Quote by MikeBmusic
Do you have an audio interface? It's the device that converts your audio signal to digital, then delivers it to the computer by USB or Firewire. It would also supplyphantom power to the condensor mic.

Half-decent ones start at about $150, but you can find used ones cheaper. What DAW (recording software) are you planning on using?

Blankets can muffle some high reverb, but for a decent recording space, bass trapping is needed - its the build up of low-mid and bass waves that can muddy up recordings.
You cna't really 'soundproof' a room easily, unless you live in a basement! Recording in a closet is going to sound like ... well ... a closet.


I have a focusrite scarlett, mainly for my electric. It's also got phantom power for a condenser. I use Logic X.

Is there any way I could get decent recording sound in my room? How could I bass trap (if at all) the lower frequencies in my room (on a budget though)?

From the tips I've read/tried, the most 'ideal' place to record in my room just happens to be near my desk.. I don't know, would placing some bass trapping foam under the desk work? I realise it probably wouldn't, it's just like I said I know nothing about this topic.
#4
Something like this one

http://www.thomann.de/gb/audio_technica_at2020.htm

would do vocals and guitar - excellent quality for price

So, soundproofing is not the same as acoustic treatment. Soundproofing keeps sound getting in or out of the room, acoustic treatment fixes bad echoes (called nodes). (I'm trying to keep this simple). Suggest for acoustic guitar a blanket on the wall behind you, mic points to 12th fret at 12inches distance. Do not have mic or guitar at centre of room.

For voice, blanket of wall or door in corner of room, 2 foot out from corner, you face mic and reflections absorbed by blanket. Pop filter shield is good. Semi-circular absorbers (SE) unnecessary.

Key is to experiment. With furniture in your room it's probably dead enough anyway - add reverb to taste, in your DAW. (Suggest Reaper).
#5
Quote by PSimonR
Something like this one

http://www.thomann.de/gb/audio_technica_at2020.htm

would do vocals and guitar - excellent quality for price

So, soundproofing is not the same as acoustic treatment. Soundproofing keeps sound getting in or out of the room, acoustic treatment fixes bad echoes (called nodes). (I'm trying to keep this simple). Suggest for acoustic guitar a blanket on the wall behind you, mic points to 12th fret at 12inches distance. Do not have mic or guitar at centre of room.

For voice, blanket of wall or door in corner of room, 2 foot out from corner, you face mic and reflections absorbed by blanket. Pop filter shield is good. Semi-circular absorbers (SE) unnecessary.

Key is to experiment. With furniture in your room it's probably dead enough anyway - add reverb to taste, in your DAW. (Suggest Reaper).


thanks. But is this still far from studio quality? Obviously I expect studio quality to be a lot better, but will this be enough to get a reasonably good sound? It just seems from your posts like doing what you described above is sufficient, whereas on other sides i read just how much of a problem recording at home in an untreated room is,and that its by far the most important aspect of recording (even more so than the mic)
#6
If you want to treat your room then do that and get whatever nice condenser or ribbon mic if it's only for acoustic guitars and vocals.

If you don't want to treat your room mind that most condensers will pick up more room than most dynamics, so while you may have heard/seen condenser mics in studios or adverts or whatever, getting an SM57 or 58 might be a better idea.
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#7
Quote by Spambot_2
If you want to treat your room then do that and get whatever nice condenser or ribbon mic if it's only for acoustic guitars and vocals.

If you don't want to treat your room mind that most condensers will pick up more room than most dynamics, so while you may have heard/seen condenser mics in studios or adverts or whatever, getting an SM57 or 58 might be a better idea.


Well are there any cheap and somewhat effective ways I could treat my room to get a decent sound when recording? Also would that booth thing I posted in the OP be effective?
#8
Quote by mickel_w
Well are there any cheap and somewhat effective ways I could treat my room to get a decent sound when recording? Also would that booth thing I posted in the OP be effective?

Buy some Owens Corning 703/705 or some Roxul (Safe 'N Sound should be available at your local Home Depot/Lowes, if you can't find something like RHT80 locally) and build frames out of wood and wrap them yourself. That'll save you a TON of money.

The makeshift booth in the OP can help to isolate the sound from other things, but it won't really work to treat the room. Most microphones utilize a cardioid pickup pattern, which looks like this:



It's not picking up much from the sides or back of the mic, so treatment behind it won't really do anything to mitigate bad frequencies in your room, just reduce reflections back into the microphone, or isolate it from sound that's coming from behind it. I find things like that booth very effective when you're micing a snare drum, because it's very effective at blocking the hi-hats from bleeding into the mic, but I wouldn't use it as a substitute for room treatment on a vocal - only augmentation.
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#9
Do a youtube search for broadband absorbers or bass traps, and you will find some that show you how to build them simply - some 1x4 wood, and the OC705, 705 or Roxul insulation, and some cloth stapled over the frame. You can build half a dozen 2'x4'x4" thk for under $250.00.
Do not buy 'acoustic foam' - it absorbs the highs like moving blankets, etc, but does nothing for the lows. If you use a ton of blankets and things and your room sounds 'dead', try recording, you may find you have a real 'boxy' sound because all the high frequencies have been sucked out.
My reverbnation page


2012 Taylor 310ce
2011 Fender CD140SCE
Ibanez 12 string a/e
73 Epi 6830E
72 Fender Telecaster
Epi Dot Studio
Epi LP Jr
Chinese Strat clone
Washburn Mandolin
Luna 'tatoo' a/e uke
antique banjolin
Squire J bass
#10
Ok. So if I'm looking for a decent vocal sound, I can't just get away with recording in a somewhat dead spot of my room and putting a blanket behind me? If I want results, I should invest in it and go about this properly?

I don't have the room or money to build/buy many bass traps
Last edited by mickel_w at Aug 5, 2014,
#11
Quote by mickel_w
Ok. So if I'm looking for a decent vocal sound, I can't just get away with recording in a somewhat dead spot of my room and putting a blanket behind me? If I want results, I should invest in it and go about this properly?

I don't have the room or money to build/buy many bass traps

You can definitely try - as long as you're not looking for professional results, as long as it's dead enough, it could work.

Honestly, it depends more on what mic you're using and what kind of music you're recording. Plenty of professionally released metal albums were recorded with a hand-held microphone in a corner with blankets all around them
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#12
Quote by MatrixClaw
You can definitely try - as long as you're not looking for professional results, as long as it's dead enough, it could work.

Honestly, it depends more on what mic you're using and what kind of music you're recording. Plenty of professionally released metal albums were recorded with a hand-held microphone in a corner with blankets all around them


Haha, yeah fair enough. And I'll be recording just some standard male and female vocals, as well as some 'rap' (think Massive Attack style?). And acoustic guitar too.

I'm thinking of getting an SE Magneto - it looks/sounds good enough. Would that mic be suitable for both that sort of rapping and standard vocals? (once again, i just like to make music in my bedroom, not a pro producer )
#13
^ I'd take an NT-1A over the magneto, for around that price.
They'd be suitable, yeah, but again, in that setting you're better off picking as little room as possible, so an SM57 might be an idea if you're on the cheap.
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#14
Quote by mickel_w
Haha, yeah fair enough. And I'll be recording just some standard male and female vocals, as well as some 'rap' (think Massive Attack style?). And acoustic guitar too.

I'm thinking of getting an SE Magneto - it looks/sounds good enough. Would that mic be suitable for both that sort of rapping and standard vocals? (once again, i just like to make music in my bedroom, not a pro producer )

I honestly don't have any experience with that mic, so it's hard to say. Generally, mics in that range are fairly poor... but the one (and only) I've used that packed a punch well above its price point is the MXL V67G. It's very much tuned for vocals and might not work as well with some voices as others - but it's a mic that isn't easily replaced until you get into mics 10 times its price.
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#15
Quote by Spambot_2
^ I'd take an NT-1A over the magneto, for around that price

+1
It's the best bang for the buck in a serious condenser mic for vocals.
http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=rode+nt1+a&tag=googhydr-20&index=aps&hvadid=9031998687&hvpos=1t1&hvexid=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=9993608593747036846&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=b&hvdev=c&ref=pd_sl_9io8wdg0zj_b


Room tuning is an art and worthy of some acoustics study so you understand the problems and solutions. You will get much better results this way.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#16
Quote by Cajundaddy

I dunno about that... the NT-1A is just about my least favorite condenser mic ever. Never really understood the love for that mic, I think it sounds terrible... but it works for a lot of people, so I must be missing something
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#17
Quote by MatrixClaw
I dunno about that... the NT-1A is just about my least favorite condenser mic ever. Never really understood the love for that mic, I think it sounds terrible... but it works for a lot of people, so I must be missing something


Gotta go with what works for you and different ears hear different things. This guy still uses the NT-1a so they got somethin'.
http://www.sonnoxplugins.com/pub/plugins/User-Rob_Hoffman.htm
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#18
Quote by Cajundaddy
Gotta go with what works for you and different ears hear different things. This guy still uses the NT-1a so they got somethin'.
http://www.sonnoxplugins.com/pub/plugins/User-Rob_Hoffman.htm

I seriously doubt he uses it often, though
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maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





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#19
Quote by MatrixClaw
I seriously doubt he uses it often, though


Last summer when I was at a session in Northridge. Longhouse studio owned by Wendy Waldman. Rob is a rather brilliant engineer who was handling the ProTools that evening. Still waiting on final production for that album though.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#20
I don't know where you're from but you can get acoustic tiles pretty cheap on Ebay, I think I got 24 tiles about 12 inches across each for less than £30 on there

I also use an SE electronics reflection filter (http://www.seelectronics.com/reflexion-filter-x) and push a mattress up on the wall behind me when I'm recording vocals.

My room used to sound sh*t before i bothered with any of this but now when I'm recording vocals or hand percussion in there it's half decent (the room was never gonna be great haha)

Not that you'd necessarily need any of these, some rooms just sound naturally brilliant, but I'm guessing you're not in an acoustic chamber or cathedral
#21
I don't have the money to treat the room, so apart from doing stuff like hanging blankets around and whatnot there's not much else I can do. Now, does this mean I should get an SM57, as it would pick up less of the room? I've heard that the sm57 is an all round good mic, and many people also use them for vocals.
#22
I can't recommend the Rode NT-1 for rap vocals. The NT-1 is my favorite vocal mic (I like it better than my AKG's or Audio Technica mics on vocals), but for rap I'd recommend a good dynamic like the Shure SM57 or SM58 and a good pop filter. The NT-1 is great for subltle up close vocal work but it doesn't respond well to sharp dynamic peaks that rap is usually loaded with. I also have the Shure Beta 87A condenser which could handle the peaks better but it costs more than double what a new Shure SM57 or 58 will run. Every studio should have a few SM57 mics on hand (they usually do). It's the best $100.00 mic you can get that will handle can just about anything well.
As for recording vocals in a bedroom I suggest the "poor man's" vocal booth...the clothes closet. Part the clothes in the middle (or take some out if it's full), hang a blanket over the inside of the door, close the door as much as possible and you'll get some great isolation for vocal recording.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Aug 6, 2014,
#23
Just out of curiosity, what AKG's and AT's do you have at your disposal to prefer SM57s to them?

I wouldn't really recommend the SM57 for the sound, I would either recommend it for the versatility or the fact that it pick up veeery little to no room sound when recording.

While that may be liked among rappers and such, 9 out of 10 I wouldn't take it over a nice condenser for vocals.
Though you can't really get nice condensers for the price of an SM57 so it really boils down to the max money one's willing to spend
Name's Luca.

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#24
No, don't get me wrong. I don't recommend the SM57 or Sm58 over the AKG or Audio Technica's. I like the Rode NT-1 for vocals better than the AKG or Audio Technica's I have. Not by much however and I use them for other things that I think they do better than the NT-1 like acoustic guitar or other instruments (I really like the AKG C3000 on acoustics). The Audio Technica I have is an older AT2035 which is great to record my VOX VT30 amp about a foot away from the speaker (good full sound). They are nice mics but I just like vocals on the Rode NT-1.
#25
I wish I could test a lot of microphones through my own system but all the mics I have were either recommended by someone or from a review I read. I own a couple of relatively inexpensive mics like MXR and M-Audio. Some are pretty good nd some just go back in the box. The M-Audio Nova is really decent $100.00 mic. With a little EQ it is not bad at all. The MXR's are hit and miss. Just my opinion. If I had a choice and money wasn't a factor I'd love to own an AKG 414 but that's a dream.
#26
Quote by Rickholly74
No, don't get me wrong. I don't recommend the SM57 or Sm58 over the AKG or Audio Technica's. I like the Rode NT-1 for vocals better than the AKG or Audio Technica's I have. Not by much however and I use them for other things that I think they do better than the NT-1 like acoustic guitar or other instruments (I really like the AKG C3000 on acoustics). The Audio Technica I have is an older AT2035 which is great to record my VOX VT30 amp about a foot away from the speaker (good full sound). They are nice mics but I just like vocals on the Rode NT-1.

See, my gripe with the NT-1A is, like all of the Chinese-made mics in this price level, it has a really hyped high end, with flatter or rolled off mids, that I just find too abrasive for any of the vocals I'm recording. Don't get me wrong, sometimes these mics can work wonders on a vocalist - especially those who are more of a baritone voice, but the majority of singers in rock music are higher pitched, which these mics tend to accentuate sibilance in their voices too much. Obviously, you can augment with EQ, but I often times find the high end to just be too harsh to tame adequately and it usually turns up sounding really cloudy or I end up compensating by making the overall mix brighter to fit.

In think in this price range, it's honestly hard to find a mic that's going to be much of a keeper in the first place. The only two I've used that I would still use today, being that I have quite a bit of more expensive mics, are the MXL V67G I mentioned earlier and CAD M179. Even if I don't use these on voice - the V67Gs make really great room mics (or overheads, if you like a fatter sound) and the M179s are phenomenal on toms and also sound great for room mics and overheads... The M179 is actually one of the few condensers I've also ever liked on electric guitar, but I'm not a huge fan of it on vocals (it's still probably far better than most others at its price, though). The V67G actually reminds me quite a bit of my Bock Audio 195, which costs 10 times more
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#27
I don't know where my pair of Rode NT-1's were made. Maybe China I don't know. I have had them for more than 10 years now. I know what you are referring to about it sounding different on different singers. It sounds amazing on my partners voice but she has a great voice and vocal control that I don't have. I do like the NT-1 better for vocals than my other mics. I mentioned the AKG 414 because about five years ago I did a session for a band at their home studio and singer was able to borrow an AKG 414. It blew me away. Maybe it just fit him perfectly or whatever but that mic just floored me when I recorded the vocals. At $1,000.00+ plus I can't afford it. )Too many new guitars, keys, PA equipment and other recording gear on my wish list...and two kids in college. Sigh.).
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Aug 6, 2014,
#28
^ I wouldn't use C414's on a lot of vocals if I could choose between that and whatever other mic in the same price range, it sounds too clean and natural and accurate.
I'd use it for rap for example.

For most stuff, was I to choose a $1000 mic for vocals I'd go for a Joly modded 2003A or an MK-012-01 + head.

Anyway, C414's go for $600 or less used on ebay.com, and I didn't spend more than a minute looking - if you want one just sell a mic of yours (or two) you don't find useful and get a used one.

That's how I see it at least.
Quote by MatrixClaw
See, my gripe with the NT-1A is, like all of the Chinese-made mics in this price level, it has a really hyped high end, with flatter or rolled off mids, *long rest of the message*
Mic placement together with a good pop filter, proximity effect and a dead if not good sounding spot in the room can do wonders in my experience.
Name's Luca.

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#29
Here is a quick comparison between the simple NT-1a and one of the most famous vocal recording mics of all time. Scroll down to use the comparison chart and compare with a U-87 and U-47 (Frank Sinatra mic). A lotta bang for the buck at $230.

http://recordinghacks.com/microphones/Rode/NT1-A
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Aug 6, 2014,
#30
Quote by Cajundaddy
Here is a quick comparison between the simple NT-1a and one of the most famous vocal recording mics of all time. Scroll down to use the comparison chart and compare with a U-87 and U-47 (Frank Sinatra mic). A lotta bang for the buck at $230.

http://recordinghacks.com/microphones/Rode/NT1-A

Looking at a frequency response chart is hardly a valid comparison between two mics.
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maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





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#31
First of all these are the manufacturer-provided specs, that have to be taken with a pinch of salt.

Also the frequency response really doesn't mean that much.
It means stuff but even if the thing had the same frequency response as a c800-g it would not sound like a c800-g in a thousand years.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#32
Quote by MatrixClaw
Looking at a frequency response chart is hardly a valid comparison between two mics.


I tend to agree... unless someone make a sweeping statement like this:

"See, my gripe with the NT-1A is, like all of the Chinese-made mics in this price level, it has a really hyped high end, with flatter or rolled off mids, that I just find too abrasive for any of the vocals I'm recording."

Come to find out the "hyped high end" on an NT-1a is nearly identical to the Neumann U-47 (Sinatra mic). Specs don't answer all questions about performance but they do add perspective.

The NT-1a is a very inexpensive condenser mic that performs well above it's price point and many many project studios lean on them heavily for vocals. It will never be as sweet as a vintage U-47 but it is very good at 1/100th the price. As always, gotta go with what works for you though. Ears rule and dogs drool.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Aug 7, 2014,
#33
Quote by Cajundaddy
I tend to agree... unless someone make a sweeping statement like this:

"See, my gripe with the NT-1A is, like all of the Chinese-made mics in this price level, it has a really hyped high end, with flatter or rolled off mids, that I just find too abrasive for any of the vocals I'm recording."

Come to find out the "hyped high end" on an NT-1a is nearly identical to the Neumann U-47 (Sinatra mic). Specs don't answer all questions about performance but they do add perspective.

The NT-1a is a very inexpensive condenser mic that performs well above it's price point and many many project studios lean on them heavily for vocals. It will never be as sweet as a vintage U-47 but it is very good at 1/100th the price. As always, gotta go with what works for you though. Ears rule and dogs drool.

If you've ever actually used a U47, you'd know it has a much smoother high end and a more middy sound that balances it out and makes it sound significantly fatter than most everything in the sub-$1000 range. There have also been more than 5 different models of the U47 made throughout history.

Even looking at the graph, it's easy to see that the NT1-A does not have a "nearly identical" high end - a "harsh" or "hyped" region in the frequency spectrum is usually categorized by sharp peaks and valleys in the graph. The NT1-A has 5 very steep peaks from 2kHz to about 15kHz in its graph. The Neumann may have a bump in a similar region, but it's a very smooth curve, unlike the jagged line that characterizes the entire response along the NT1-A's 20Hz - 20kHz range.
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#34
Quote by MatrixClaw
Even looking at the graph, it's easy to see that the NT1-A does not have a "nearly identical" high end - a "harsh" or "hyped" region in the frequency spectrum is usually categorized by sharp peaks and valleys in the graph. The NT1-A has 5 very steep peaks from 2kHz to about 15kHz in its graph. The Neumann may have a bump in a similar region, but it's a very smooth curve, unlike the jagged line that characterizes the entire response along the NT1-A's 20Hz - 20kHz range.

This confirms what I've been hearing out of this mic for the past 6 years. The best thing I can think of is that it sounds brittle and glassy. I've posted that here before too. Not my go-to for vocals.
Quote by WCPhils
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#35
I had an NT-1. Not the NT-1A, but the original NT-1, made in Australia. It was a decent mic and served me well for a few years. I did eventually out-grow it though, but would certainly recommend it as an entry-level mic. (can't comment on the NT-1A or any of the other Chinese models....)

Here is a blog post I did about acoustics and soundproofing. I tried to make it pretty simple and general, but useful and easy to understand.

Included within is a link to how I made my own acoustic panels, and some links to some further reading.

http://greenroommusicblog.blogspot.ca/2013/05/sound-proofing-and-sound-treatment.html

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Aug 8, 2014,
#36
Quote by axemanchris
I had an NT-1. Not the NT-1A, but the original NT-1, made in Australia. It was a decent mic and served me well for a few years. I did eventually out-grow it though, but would certainly recommend it as an entry-level mic. (can't comment on the NT-1A or any of the other Chinese models....)

Here is a blog post I did about acoustics and soundproofing. I tried to make it pretty simple and general, but useful and easy to understand.

Included within is a link to how I made my own acoustic panels, and some links to some further reading.

http://greenroommusicblog.blogspot.ca/2013/05/sound-proofing-and-sound-treatment.html

CT


Thanks, that's useful.

I actually posted this on gearslutz too, and Ethan Winer linked me to his website which explains it in quite a lot of detail. However I think that for now I will just get a decent large condenser mic (within the budget that I've got anyway) and buy some corner bass traps. I'll experiment with duvets and whatnot, and if I want to take it further and achieve a better sound I'll look at some panels to put up on the walls.

Thanks to everyone who posted in the thread, I learned quite a lot
#37
For the price of buying corner traps, you could build your own AND broadband absorbers. Why not do that?

Hell... I have absolutely no aptitude for building things, so if I can do it, pretty well anyone can.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#38
^Sorry, yeah I meant build, not buy. Looking to spend as little money as possible

EDIT: btw, I've decided to go with the SE x1, as I have a very good deal on a brand new bundle with a pop filter, shock mount, cable and a reflexion booth (i know the last one is not great, but I'm basically getting it for free). The mixed reviews about the nt-1a just put me off, it seems it's either love it or absolutely hate it.
Last edited by mickel_w at Aug 8, 2014,
#39
Thanks for the above post. I guess my pair of NT-1 are original modals made in Australia. I know that I have had them for more than 10 years, probably close to 12-13 years. I have never had the luxuary of using a U-47 but they are way out of my price range. The going price on line varies around $3500.00. Comparing a $229.00 Rode NT-1 to a $3,500.00 Neumann U-47 is like comparing a Toyota to a Porsche.

If you can afford a $3,500.oo microphone I say congratulations. You have made better life choices than I have. (And I'm not being sarcastic)
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Aug 8, 2014,
#40
Quote by Rickholly74
Thanks for the above post. I guess my pair of NT-1 are original modals made in Australia. I know that I have had them for more than 10 years, probably close to 12-13 years. I have never had the luxuary of using a U-47 but they are way out of my price range. The going price on line varies around $3500.00. Comparing a $229.00 Rode NT-1 to a $3,500.00 Neumann U-47 is like comparing a Toyota to a Porsche.

If you can afford a $3,500.oo microphone I say congratulations. You have made better life choices than I have. (And I'm not being sarcastic)

Stellar CM-6 is one of the best decisions I made on a mic purchase ever:

http://www.stellarmicdesign.com/Purchase-Here.html

For $500, you're getting A LOT of mic for the money. It's a U47 clone - obviously, it's not using quite the quality of parts as a real U47 does, but with a tube upgrade, it gets surprisingly close to the real thing, for a hell of a lot cheaper.

Just for conversation's sake - I sold my Audio Technica AT4060 to upgrade to a Peluso 2247 LE and then heard about Stellar and decided I'd take a chance a CM-5 and CM-6 I found used for a good price, thinking I could always sell them if they didn't live up to my expectations. I ended up getting both and doing a shootout between both of them and the Peluso, as well as a Neumann U87, at my friend's studio. 60-70% of the time we chose the Stellars over the two others, which cost nearly $2000 more. Needless to say, I decided to just stick with the Stellars and I'm more than happy I did. The other two mics weren't worth the price to me for a 30-40% chance they were going to sound better - I was expecting them to blow the Stellars away in almost everything - not the case!

I ended up taking that money that I saved and bought my Bock Audio 195 as an alternative to a U87, pocketing the rest of the cash. Honestly - I still prefer the Stellars for 95% of the things I'd use the 195 for and, it too, is a far more expensive mic.
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maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





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