#1
I have an opportunity to trade a 1972 Rickenbacker 4001 bass for a 1976 Gibson SG in Polaris White finish. The SG does not include the original case, but it does appear to be all original. The Rick has a bad neck pup, but does include the ohsc. As a straight trade, does this make sense to you? I can also choose a '59 Melody Maker with a $500~ guitar thrown in. I'm not positive I want to trade the Rick, but those are some tempting offers. Here are some pics of the SG.





#2
i have severe doubts that that is a 76 SG. position markers are wrong for starters. no pic of front of headstock which would help. also don't remember Gibson stamping sg standard on guitars at that time. serial number doesn't seem to read 76 either.
#3
Quote by monwobobbo
i have severe doubts that that is a 76 SG. position markers are wrong for starters. no pic of front of headstock which would help. also don't remember Gibson stamping sg standard on guitars at that time. serial number doesn't seem to read 76 either.

When comparing it to my '73 SG I have every reason to believe it's a genuine '76 SG standard. All the details seem to match up with the year of manufacture.

Between '75 and '76 I think gibson went through a phase of stamping the model name on the guitar for some reason and changed to a serial number format that matches the serial number of this guitar. They switched to the format they still use today in 1977.

But really, I'd question whether exchanging a 1972 Rickenbacker 4001 for a norlin era SG works in your favour in terms of resale value on the vintage market... That seems a little bit too much to pay for a '76 SG, especially one that's had an extra hole drilled in the front to house a mini-toggle switch or something.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#4
70s SGs are perhaps the least collectible due to generally lower build quality. The opposite is true of Ricks from that era. I'd say the SG is worth maybe $1000 and the Rick $2000 depending on condition of course.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#5
I appreciate the input. I figured a 70's era cherry Sg was fairly run-of-the-mill, but the polaris white finish is what had me intrigued. I'll have to see if there are any other options.
#6
I'd not get the SG, but the Melody Maker might be worth it considering the condition.
#7
General consensus seems to be to pass on the SG. I thought the Rick was a step up, but didn't realize quite how much. The Melody maker looked pretty nice. Might have to go that route.
#8
Play it first and see if you want to own it. The Melody Maker was a student guitar so it was somewhat unrefined, but a 59 with sc pickups just sounds killer and has some visual mojo. Tuners and bridge hardware are pretty primitive.

Do you plan to gig with this axe? If so a recent SG Standard is really a pretty nice axe with signature tone and high build quality. It will probably be a better player than either of those vintage guitars. I separate my vintage collectibles from the gig axes cause I don't want someone running off with my Vintage '55 LP while I am in the head or knocking it over onstage. I gig with guitars generally worth less than $800 and save the antiques for the studio..
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Aug 5, 2014,