#1
Hello,

I've tried scouring the farthest depths of the internet today in order to try and locate an answer to a question with a couple of parts to it.

First off, I feel as if I need a new guitar. I picked up a nylon string acoustic at a charity shop as I have been playing flamenco guitar on a steel string for quite some time now, tried it out, and it sounds just as Spanish as I would like it to. This brings me to my next point.

I play percussive flamenco guitar, which is really heavy on the percussive side, so much so that I cracked the soundboard on my last guitar and then had to repair the side of it (but it looks awesome now that it's got character). So which wood could handle a battering of that magnitude, and would it be a good idea to get it reinforced? If so, which wood would be best for reinforcing it from the inside of the body?

I am looking for a flamenco guitar specifically, and I know that they are usually made of white cypress, sycamore, or cedar, but I honestly don't know if they could handle the walloping which they would receive.

I'm in the UK, but I am open to anyone that has knowledge of experienced flamenco luthiers. I am just looking at what prices I would need to consider for a guitar with these qualities, and I know that it is an extremely specific area.

Thanks
#3
For a price range, I would seriously consider the $3000-$5000 range, as a sort of minimum
My God, it's full of stars!
#4
Quote by RndyW0
...[ ]....I play percussive flamenco guitar, which is really heavy on the percussive side, so much so that I cracked the soundboard on my last guitar and then had to repair the side of it (but it looks awesome now that it's got character). So which wood could handle a battering of that magnitude, and would it be a good idea to get it reinforced? If so, which wood would be best for reinforcing it from the inside of the body?
"Flamenco Guitarras", usually have a clear plastic, "golpeador" attached to the sound board for protection. So maybe you should be thinking of installing one of those, instead of working inside out . I've been watching R & G videos, trying to find out if they use them, but they're hidden the glare from the lights. Yet I don't see any.

Their Yamahas do have extremely long tails on the bridges, to spread out the impact.

Quote by RndyW0
I am looking for a flamenco guitar specifically, and I know that they are usually made of white cypress, sycamore, or cedar, but I honestly don't know if they could handle the walloping which they would receive.
Maybe you should be earning decent money, "walloping", before you commit to a high end purchase. In any case I strenuously doubt that R & G smack the crap out of the primero stage instruments while they're practicing.

And dude, cedar is incredibly soft.

So, I'm not feeling the sympathy or the pity, because you broke a "thrift shop beater", and think it's a bit foolhardy to believe simply spending a lot more money will solve the problem.

As to woods, you could try 3/4" CDX plywood, or perhaps 3/4" birch, they won't give you much in the way of resonance, but you'll break your hand first.

So, http://www.mundo-flamenco.com/en/infos/gluing-on-a-golpeador.html

http://www.stringdancer.com/home/articles/instrument_maintenance/installing-a-golpeador-on-a-nylon-string-guitar/

https://www.lasonanta.eu/en/guitarras-flamencas-clavijeros-golpeadores-unas-zapatos-para-flamenco/guitar-tap-plate?mode=list
Last edited by Captaincranky at Aug 5, 2014,
#5
Quote by Captaincranky
"Flamenco Guitarras", usually have a clear plastic, "golpeador" attached to the sound board for protection. So maybe you should be thinking of installing one of those, instead of working inside out . I've been watching R & G videos, trying to find out if they use them, but they're hidden the glare from the lights. Yet I don't see any.

Their Yamahas do have extremely long tails on the bridges, to spread out the impact.

Maybe you should be earning decent money, "walloping", before you commit to a high end purchase. In any case I strenuously doubt that R & G smack the crap out of the primero stage instruments while they're practicing.

And dude, cedar is incredibly soft.

So, I'm not feeling the sympathy or the pity, because you broke a "thrift shop beater", and think it's a bit foolhardy to believe simply spending a lot more money will solve the problem.

As to woods, you could try 3/4" CDX plywood, or perhaps 3/4" birch, they won't give you much in the way of resonance, but you'll break your hand first.

So, http://www.mundo-flamenco.com/en/infos/gluing-on-a-golpeador.html

http://www.stringdancer.com/home/articles/instrument_maintenance/installing-a-golpeador-on-a-nylon-string-guitar/

https://www.lasonanta.eu/en/guitarras-flamencas-clavijeros-golpeadores-unas-zapatos-para-flamenco/guitar-tap-plate?mode=list


"Guitarras flamencas" or "flamenco guitars". Don't thank me, just send a money order.

I also would stay away from expensive and cedar. You can't get the flamenco sound and have it strong enough to take a severe beating. Golpe is about control, not heavy-handed bashing.Just out of interest, I went to see Paco Pena the other week. He and his group don't do golpe any more, they have a cajon player instead. A step backwards, IMO.
#6
Quote by Tony Done
...[ ]....I also would stay away from expensive and cedar. You can't get the flamenco sound and have it strong enough to take a severe beating. Golpe is about control, not heavy-handed bashing...[ ]....
And in the case of R & G, most likey contact mics under the sound board. Then there's the cabinet behind her, with a least two 18" sub-woofers.
Quote by Tony Done
"Guitarras flamencas" or "flamenco guitars". Don't thank me, just send a money order..
...Wull ah,mine was close enough for "Espanglish". At least I didn't call them, "guitarros flamencos".
Last edited by Captaincranky at Aug 5, 2014,