#1
Hi! I've been practicing the blues scale for a while and i feel safe playing it but im stuck!! Thats the only scale i know ! Could you recommend me more scales? Or if there is a thread that has them please post the link, i am starting in the "guitar solo" world and i just want some advice, thanks in advance!!
#4
Quote by olix95
what you need is modes


No. No TS does not need modes. Almost no one needs modes.

TS: In what way are you stuck? Feel like you're not getting enough out of the scale or do you just end up playing the same licks over and over? Really the first stage in solving this problem is thinking about the kinds of sounds you want to make, that way getting a clear idea of how to get what you want out of the instrument is much easier.
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#5
I went to the Aeolian mode shape next which is also call the "natural minor" scale or some people just call it the minor scale

The one I mean is the first shape on this image: This is in the key of A minor

http://www.guitar-chords.org.uk/modeimages/aaeolianpatterns.gif

notice that the pentatonic shape is contained within the Aeolian shape.

If u take that shape and move it down and start it on the 2nd fret it becomes an A MAJOR shape
#6
Your problem has nothing to do with scales, shapes, patterns or what things are called. You simply need to do less looking and more thinking and listening.

In other words actually decide what it is you want to play rather than choosing a pattern to follow and hoping something good comes out when you put your fingers somewhere. It'll be slow going at first but you have to start somewhere, and with more experience you get getter at it. At the moment you're pretty much approaching things backward, by just allowing your fingers to wander through a well-drilled pattern on autopilot. That's not really "playing the guitar", that's the guitar playing you.

A musical instrument is a way to express yourself, so when you're playing you really need to decide what it is you're trying to say. It doesn't have to be complicated and you don't necessarily even need to get it right every time but there has to be some kind of goal in mind when you play, there has to be an idea that's giving you at least some direction. The shapes and names if scales don't matter in that respect, what matters is the sounds you're making...how does each note you're choosing work in relation to the one you just played and the one you're going to play next? How do the notes you're using work with the chords you're playing over? What's the best way to articulate those notes to convey whatever it is you're trying to say? Those are the things that really matter when it comes to getting to grips with playing lead and expressing yourself.

Theory is a valuable tool when it comes to understanding those things but it's important to remember that a pattern of dots on the guitar isn't "a scale", a scale is a collection of pitches...it's sounds. And until you understand the sounds contained within that scale and how they work together you haven't really learned anything that's of any great use.
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#7
Quote by MeTAL SOLDIER
Hi! I've been practicing the blues scale for a while and i feel safe playing it but im stuck!! Thats the only scale i know ! Could you recommend me more scales? Or if there is a thread that has them please post the link, i am starting in the "guitar solo" world and i just want some advice, thanks in advance!!


Short and useful/practical answer :

Aoelian (natural Minor) scale, Minor Pentatonic, Harmonic Minor, Dorian Mode, Phrygian Mode - that sums up 99% of heavy metal, along with the blues scale. Learn them all starting with the same root note so that you can see how the intervals differ from each other and how that effects the sound. The chord progression will dictate, to some extent, what is usable or not in a given circumstance.

It's important to learn songs or solos that incorporate those as well so that you have some musical context to make sense out of them.
#8
Ears, really big ears.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#9
Quote by reverb66
Short and useful/practical answer :

Aoelian (natural Minor) scale, Minor Pentatonic, Harmonic Minor, Dorian Mode, Phrygian Mode - that sums up 99% of heavy metal, along with the blues scale. Learn them all starting with the same root note so that you can see how the intervals differ from each other and how that effects the sound. The chord progression will dictate, to some extent, what is usable or not in a given circumstance.

It's important to learn songs or solos that incorporate those as well so that you have some musical context to make sense out of them.


Why should TS learn those if they can't move away from the blues phrasing though? Adding extra notes isn't going to help that much, they're just going to end up playing the same ideas with different tonal qualities rather than actually playing anything substantially different.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

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#10
What I suggest is taking some time to examine intervals, which is just the distance between two different notes. Spend a few days with that and you'll notice that some intervals sound sadder/darker (minor) and some sound happier/brighter (major).

Now, because you can associate these intervals with these feelings and emotions, just consider what you are trying to communicate through your playing and apply those intervals accordingly.

I also suggest learning a few octave shapes to help cement the layout of the fretboard in your mind. If you know what note is where, you can play just about anything you want as long as you land on the octave of whatever key you're playing in. Guitar maestros such as Guthrie Govan have proven over and over that you can play all of the "wrong notes" that are humanly possible to play so long as you draw all the attention towards the right ones (by using accents and playing them on the more important beats in the measure). Flight of the Bumblebee, anyone?
#11
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Why should TS learn those if they can't move away from the blues phrasing though? Adding extra notes isn't going to help that much, they're just going to end up playing the same ideas with different tonal qualities rather than actually playing anything substantially different.


I am assuming he's into metal, from his username. The major scale and major modes aren't going to provide him much use unless he can find a way re-arrange the entire genre.
#12
Quote by reverb66
I am assuming he's into metal, from his username. The major scale and major modes aren't going to provide him much use unless he can find a way re-arrange the entire genre.


Not that this really related to what I said but... there's plenty of major key metal out there, if you can't find it then you're only scratching the surface of what metal really is.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#13
The real short answer is:

Play things you want to/inspires you. Eventually you will find your own way.
Do you feel like I do!?
#14
Quote by EddieHet
The real short answer is:

Play things you want to/inspires you. Eventually you will find your own way.


That is a really short answer. It's also in no way helpful to the OP, who is asking for some specific practical advice.
#15
Thanks!! I think i'll start to wonder in that scales, also i am not that much in to metal i just want to be a more versatile player i mostly play hard rock and 80s rock with my band and im starting a real band so i want to be able to improvise stuff and maybe write some solos


And yes i did my account when i was 16 so metal was my life :p
#16
Thought I'd posted in this thread yesterday. The best thing you can do to make composing your own solos a breeze is to sing your scales as you practice them.

Another great scale to use is the extended blues scale, including the BB Box. There are plenty of guitarists that have made their entire careers from using that scale and that scale only.
#18
Have you thought about creating melodies and lines using chord tones?Find the notes in used in each chord of a progression and improvise over them using the chord tones.When you get that down you can add in chromatic passing tones etc.Also the major scale is invaluable to move on to the next level imo.I was stuck where you are for years until i broke out and discovered a whole new world of opportunities and enthusiasm to play.
#19
Hey - this is what really helped me with playing melodic solos that I liked:

I used to play scales up and down or patterns or random notes and kind of tried to hit the right notes and tried to get the cool sound, but it rarely happened until I changed the philosophy of playing.

Somebody has already said that you should decide to play things before you play them and that you should think more and not just hit random notes and hope then to be right.

I agree with this very much - but my way of doing it is this:

Whenever I practice guitar, I separate some time to specifically practice singing little phrases that just come out of nowhere into my mind and then immediately playing them on guitar. The more that you practice this, the faster you can play phrases and melodies that you hear in your head, instead of just playing random notes in the key. Your playing starts to sound much more interesting, because the melodies and phrases are kind of constructed, and not just randomly played.

I know that you asked for a specific scale that you can learn, but I think this is much easier, much effective and fun thing to do - and you can do it with any scale that you want, so you can start immediately with the blues scale that you already know.