#1
Hello,
I have this quick question to ask: If I play a Minor Pentatonic or a Melodic Minor or a Harmonic Minor with the root note C, am I in the key of C or C minor?
Thanks
Last edited by Jayerrr at Aug 8, 2014,
#2
Quote by Jayerrr
Hello,
I have this quick question to ask: If I play a Minor Pentatonic or a Melodic Minor or a Harmonic Minor with the root note C, am I in the key of C or C minor?
Thanks


I dunno like I guess it will forever be a mystery
#3
Sorry if I asked I was not sure...Ok thanks, it's C Minor. But then if I play the C Major on it, am I in the key of C Major right?
#5
If I play a Major Scale and my root note is C, is the key I'm in C or C Major? Sorry I'm a bit confused
#6
Quote by Jayerrr
Hello,
I have this quick question to ask: If I play a Minor Pentatonic or a Melodic Minor or a Harmonic Minor with the root note C, am I in the key of C or C minor?
Thanks


C minor.
#7
Quote by Jayerrr
If I play a Major Scale and my root note is C, is the key I'm in C or C Major? Sorry I'm a bit confused


C Major - however, C and C major are often synonyms. People rarely say the key of C major, or G major etc. in common usage. When it's major you just say the name of the note - C for instance, which implies it's major, but when it's minor, you always specifically mention minor. It's the same with most chord charts, which will just say G or C when dealing with a major chord rather than say C major or G major.
#9
the scale doesn't dictate the key unless that's the only thing playing, and even then it's a pretty weak harmonic support. the key is typically determined by the chord progression and how the song as a whole weaves together, as chords can suggest tension and resolution en masse i.e. 3+ notes at a time creating motion vs. 1 note making suggestions to the tonic relationship
#10
Quote by Hail
the scale doesn't dictate the key unless that's the only thing playing, and even then it's a pretty weak harmonic support. the key is typically determined by the chord progression and how the song as a whole weaves together, as chords can suggest tension and resolution en masse i.e. 3+ notes at a time creating motion vs. 1 note making suggestions to the tonic relationship



Young child: "So, is it true that Fire Engines are red?"

Hail: "Well red can be any number of shades; there's no fixed "red" per se, as red is a primary color at one extreme end of the visible spectrum, an effect of light with a wavelength between 610 and 780 nm"

Young child: "...."



Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Aug 8, 2014,
#11
Notice how all the scales you mentioned are minor scales. That should tell something. You are playing in C minor.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#12
The reason why this is a little confusing is simple that in a lot of rock and pop, major and minor are blended. We see a lot of the b7, b5, and b3 bent up to to the natural 3 notes in "major" songs. We see bVII, bVI, iv, and bIII - minor key chords - in major key songs a lot.

So sometimes - not always, but sometimes - when somebody says "it's in C" they mean the keynote is C but the tonality is ambiguous.

But generally, in absence of somebody saying "major" or "minor" they mean major.
#13
Quote by HotspurJr
The reason why this is a little confusing is simple that in a lot of rock and pop, major and minor are blended. We see a lot of the b7, b5, and b3 bent up to to the natural 3 notes in "major" songs. We see bVII, bVI, iv, and bIII - minor key chords - in major key songs a lot.

So sometimes - not always, but sometimes - when somebody says "it's in C" they mean the keynote is C but the tonality is ambiguous.

But generally, in absence of somebody saying "major" or "minor" they mean major.


I would generally say "im in the key of C" whether its minor or major. For all I know im standing there playing I-IV-V power chords which as we all know isnt telling me major or minor. Maybe somebody comes along later and overdubs a major melody or some minor keyboards. Who knows.

In any case im in the Key of C
#14
Quote by HotspurJr
The reason why this is a little confusing is simple that in a lot of rock and pop, major and minor are blended. We see a lot of the b7, b5, and b3 bent up to to the natural 3 notes in "major" songs. We see bVII, bVI, iv, and bIII - minor key chords - in major key songs a lot.

So sometimes - not always, but sometimes - when somebody says "it's in C" they mean the keynote is C but the tonality is ambiguous.

But generally, in absence of somebody saying "major" or "minor" they mean major.

Yeah, I agree with this. Playing in the key of C doesn't necessarily mean you are playing in C major.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#15
One more thing:

When experienced musicians are playing together, there's a certain assumption (not always accurate) that they can figure out the structure of the song just by listening. This is less true with more complex songs, but with something like a:

I vi IV V

or a

i iv bVII i

I might say, "We're in C" because I'm assuming, rightly or wrongly, that you can hear if the tonic chord is major or minor, so all you need from me is the tonic note and you can sit down and play.
#16
Quote by HotspurJr
One more thing:

When experienced musicians are playing together, there's a certain assumption (not always accurate) that they can figure out the structure of the song just by listening. This is less true with more complex songs, but with something like a:

I vi IV V

or a

i iv bVII i

I might say, "We're in C" because I'm assuming, rightly or wrongly, that you can hear if the tonic chord is major or minor, so all you need from me is the tonic note and you can sit down and play.

Bingo. This often happens with Jazz standards. The band knows the basics of the standard, so they just need the tonic and can go from there. Then, when it's time for, say, the sax player to solo...he knows what to do.
#17
I think it is C minor..Sorry i am not sure..
Last edited by richardsnelson at Aug 25, 2014,