#1
So I have been learning a few rhythm portions of songs from guitar tab with my guitar instructor. I find it interesting that we'll learn broader strokes for the rhythm portions and then worry about individual notes for solos and the like. So, right now I'm learning Ain't Talking Bout Love by Van Halen, and things like that. So for instance, we'll focus on the gist of the main riff and then really try to get the fills and individual note portions right. Is this a fairly common occurrence? Wouldn't learning the song focus on getting everything note for note? I'm sure it's a personal preference thing, I am just curious what yall think.
A day without sunshine is like, you know, night.
- Steve Martin
#2
I liked learning entire songs note for note, but to each his/her own. Yoru skill level may not be high enough for the entire song, so his approach may make sense in that context.
#4
Quote by reverb66
I liked learning entire songs note for note, but to each his/her own. Yoru skill level may not be high enough for the entire song, so his approach may make sense in that context.


My skill is the highest, he's actually paying me to take lessons! just kidding... You probably have a point there, I just thought it was interesting. To stay on the same song, Ain't Talking Bout Love, we just focused on learning the one riff in one way when its presented in a few different ways in the tab.
A day without sunshine is like, you know, night.
- Steve Martin
#5
It sorta depends, and I imagine everyone is different.

I generally try to get the gist down first and then sort of refine it after that (if I can be bothered ). Not much point in having the first 3 bars off perfectly and not being able to play the rest of the song, being able to play the whole song (even if it's a sort of dumbed-down version) is probably more useful (or at least more fun). In my opinion.

To clarify, that's not to say that I think you shouldn't eventually learn it off 100% or anything like that. I'm totally in favour of learning things properly.
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#6
It's very dependent on the song that you're learning. There are as many different rhythm guitar styles as there are lead guitar styles. Some of my favorites:

Izzy from Guns n Roses - very loose playing, much more about getting the right feel than hitting particular notes; it almost sounds lazy sometimes, but it works perfectly.

Malcolm Young from ACDC - tight chord playing for the most part; no wasted notes; locked-in groove with the bass and drums; the pauses in his playing are just as important as the notes.

Alex Lifeson from Rush (his rhythm playing) - a lot of inversions, suspended chords, and otherwise strange-sounding stuff; as weird as his playing sounds sometimes, I'm quite sure that every note is exactly what he wanted to play; generally Geddy Lee's bass carries the groove/heart of the song, and the guitar sonically fills up the space.

And of course, there's James Hetfield and many other metal guitarists, where the rhythm playing is as exacting (or more) than the soloing; every note is important, and every rhythmic figure is important.

In my opinion, you want to be able to play all of those styles well. I certainly don't claim to do so, but I write very different songs, and some call for a looser playing style, while others call for a tight, metal-riff-master playing style, and some just call for some relaxed strumming. Sometimes it changes in the same song.
#7
Quote by vikkyvik
In my opinion, you want to be able to play all of those styles well. I certainly don't claim to do so, but I write very different songs, and some call for a looser playing style, while others call for a tight, metal-riff-master playing style, and some just call for some relaxed strumming. Sometimes it changes in the same song.


That's some good food for thought, thanks man!
A day without sunshine is like, you know, night.
- Steve Martin