#1
How do you guys suggest that i put together a practice schedule to help me focus my playing and help me progress at a quicker rate?

I think having some structure would help me to progress as a player
#2
music is a constantly evolving experience, for you and in general, so there's really no "set path" for you to follow. just learn music you enjoy, by ear, and pursue it aggressively. play through scales/arpeggios/finger exercises to warm up and warm down. use a click track or metronome. stick mostly to learning music, particularly outside your comfort zone, and being able to break it down and understand how it works.

all the "10 minutes scales, 15 minutes theory, 10 minutes rehearsed pieces" crap will get you is a bad taste in your mouth and a poor representation of what music is supposed to be
#3
Quote by alexriffs
How do you guys suggest that i put together a practice schedule to help me focus my playing and help me progress at a quicker rate?

I think having some structure would help me to progress as a player


Look at your goals and skill sets needed to achieve them.

Set up a modest set of things that you want to practice, and put it together like a mini workout. Reps, sets, and proper form, start slow and progress at different speeds. Expect the results to come after, not during the workout. Make an effort to maintain consistency during the week.

Best,

Sean
#4
Quote by Sean0913
Look at your goals and skill sets needed to achieve them.

Set up a modest set of things that you want to practice, and put it together like a mini workout. Reps, sets, and proper form, start slow and progress at different speeds. Expect the results to come after, not during the workout. Make an effort to maintain consistency during the week.

Best,

Sean


I agree. Knowing what your goals are will also help you ask the right questions.
#5
Quote by Hail
music is a constantly evolving experience, for you and in general, so there's really no "set path" for you to follow. just learn music you enjoy, by ear, and pursue it aggressively. play through scales/arpeggios/finger exercises to warm up and warm down. use a click track or metronome. stick mostly to learning music, particularly outside your comfort zone, and being able to break it down and understand how it works.

all the "10 minutes scales, 15 minutes theory, 10 minutes rehearsed pieces" crap will get you is a bad taste in your mouth and a poor representation of what music is supposed to be


Agreed.

Learning tunes and learning them by ear should be the main part of your practice, in my opinion. Then what you do the rest of your time practicing depends on what you want to learn/need to know.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#6
very difficult question IMO and very doubtful that most players ever have a "set" program. Most of us learn and practice by piecemeal

I will say this much, if you are going to do any exercise that will turn your hand to mush, do it LAST or near the end of the routine.

for instance if you were going to do these 3 things: practice a complicated lick, improvise over chord changes, do a heavy workout for the 3-4th fingers....then I would definitely recommend doing the 3-4th finger thing LAST.

U dont want to be trying to learn complicated stuff with your forearm on fire because u will just be training sloppy motor patterns etc. But at the end of your routine it will be fine to push the playing muscles etc farther. There is a point of tiredness and fatigue that once u reach that point u should quit your focused learning and shift into pure "exercise" mode like 3-4 pulloffs blahblah
#7
Quote by JohnProphet
very difficult question IMO and very doubtful that most players ever have a "set" program. Most of us learn and practice by piecemeal

I will say this much, if you are going to do any exercise that will turn your hand to mush, do it LAST or near the end of the routine.

for instance if you were going to do these 3 things: practice a complicated lick, improvise over chord changes, do a heavy workout for the 3-4th fingers....then I would definitely recommend doing the 3-4th finger thing LAST.

U dont want to be trying to learn complicated stuff with your forearm on fire because u will just be training sloppy motor patterns etc. But at the end of your routine it will be fine to push the playing muscles etc farther. There is a point of tiredness and fatigue that once u reach that point u should quit your focused learning and shift into pure "exercise" mode like 3-4 pulloffs blahblah



wait

this post already makes little sense but by "forearm on fire" do you mean you pick with your forearm?

cause that's like really wrong lol
#8
Quote by Hail
wait

this post already makes little sense but by "forearm on fire" do you mean you pick with your forearm?

cause that's like really wrong lol


Indeed, the forearm should not feel anything. Since you should be picking from your wrist.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#9
Quote by Hail
wait

this post already makes little sense but by "forearm on fire" do you mean you pick with your forearm?

cause that's like really wrong lol


well there IS a forearm on the other arm too. Pretty much referring to the fretting hand in the post
#10
i dont think i've ever felt forearm pain from my fretting hand and i play a 6 string bass so idk what you're doing wrong lol
#11
Quote by alexriffs
How do you guys suggest that i put together a practice schedule to help me focus my playing and help me progress at a quicker rate?

I think having some structure would help me to progress as a player



Everyone here gave great advice, but I don't think any one person can really answer this question. The reason being is because every guitar player has different goals we don't really know what you're aiming for or your skill level of playing so this question is pretty much impossible to answer..
#12
Quote by Hail
i dont think i've ever felt forearm pain from my fretting hand and i play a 6 string bass so idk what you're doing wrong lol


yeah, the ol' opponens pollicis, it'll get ya sometimes

go watch Vinnie Moores "Speed, Accuracy, and Articulation" vid at the end of the section on left hand exercises. Maybe Vinnie is doing something wrong too

or go read about the experiences of people in the "try the 21 day method" thread
#13
Your practice time should mainly consist of practicing songs you like (via transcription) and then analyzing the theory of the songs that you are transcribing.

For specific exercises and the like, they are sometimes necessary and should be practices slow and even to a metronome.
#14
If i put down my goals then hopefully this might help you to answer the question easier

My main goal is to be able to improvise fluently with other players and backing tracks. Therefore, if i got up to jam with another band then i'd do so confidently.

My secondary goal is to learn solos from Alter Bridge and Tremonti songs as i feel this are challenging for my level of playing
#15
Quote by alexriffs
If i put down my goals then hopefully this might help you to answer the question easier

My main goal is to be able to improvise fluently with other players and backing tracks. Therefore, if i got up to jam with another band then i'd do so confidently.

My secondary goal is to learn solos from Alter Bridge and Tremonti songs as i feel this are challenging for my level of playing


Then incorporate those things into your practice session.

Sit down with tunes from Alter Bridge and Tremonti and figure them out by ear.

Improve your connection between your ear and your instrument, there are multiple ways to do this. The things i do when i practice improvisation is:

1) Listen to the tune/backing track i am going to improvise over, and start imagining/singing lines over it. Then transcribing those lines to the guitar. The more you do that the easier it gets to do it instantly on the spot.

2) Practice following the changes of a tune. If you are going to improvise over a tune that has a (for example) a I - V - vi - IV progression in C (C G Am F) you need to be able to convey that chordprogression, with or without a backing track. Start with only doing chord tones, then adding color tones (7th, 9th, 11th).

3) Try to learn songs by ear that you already have internalized, meaning songs that you (and probably most people) already know by heart from growing up. For example "Happy Birthday" or the theme to a TV show maybe? Something you dont have to listen to to remember. For example i did this not long ago with "Let it go" from Frozen, since it was played all the time when the movie came out i still have it stuck in my head.

But yeah, learning tunes and focusing on improvising is what you should incorporate into your practice with those goals.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#16
Something that really helps me...

I started an excel spreadsheet and laid out the different categories (these can be whatever you feel will help you grow as a musician). For example, singing exercises, pitching games, scales, jamming along to music, practicing tab, songwriting etc. As a singer I also include a box for yoga/physical exercise, diet (to record some of the foods I am eating e.g. dairy / caffeine / sugar as this can affect my voice) and a space for general comments where I can record how I am feeling and my progress.

I also have a box for studying "music business" where I write what I did that day to further my career weather it be working on my professional website, listening to relevant seminars or just reading articles about my favourite musicians...

Rather than force myself to do all of this every day, I go with the feeling, but make sure I fill out at least a couple of these columns every day. I am motivated to do all these throughout the week but sometimes something in particular more than others. I also record how much time I spend in each area... The idea with the spread sheet is to capture a visual representation of your progress to feed your motivation and better understand your strengths and weaknesses. It also reinforces your commitment to your own evolution as a musician through taking inventory and holding yourself accountable for your actions.

I hope this helps!
#17
Quote by alexriffs
How do you guys suggest that i put together a practice schedule to help me focus my playing and help me progress at a quicker rate?

I think having some structure would help me to progress as a player



Play alot, trust your own gut instincts, and don't over-think it.

Take lessons. A teacher can give you proper feedback and give personal guidance that you just can't get from random advice.
#18
Effective guitar practicing routines are boring, it takes all the fun out of playing guitar.

The perfect guitar practice routine schedule should contain the proper ratio of:

1. Exercises for hand strength and flexibility

2. General knowledge of and building of skills in fundamentals,

3. Review of fundamentals

4. Learning of new techniques and practice of those new skills so that they become second nature.

5. Building of your song repertoire.

6. Jamming.

7. Performance.
Last edited by richardsnelson at Aug 25, 2014,
#19
Quote by alexriffs
How do you guys suggest that i put together a practice schedule to help me focus my playing and help me progress at a quicker rate?

I think having some structure would help me to progress as a player


The easiest, simplest and most effective way to progress at a quicker rate is to simply put in more time per day. If you practice one hour a day, then double it. If you practice 2 hours per day, practice 3 or 4 instead. There's no magic formula that will replace putting in the hours, in spite of what every guitar "system" advertisement will try to sell you. Some of the most amazing players practiced 8 or more hours per day.

It's not terrible to get organized, but you can be the most organized person on the planet and you'll still sound like someone who practices 1 hour a day if that's all you're doing.
#20
Quote by richardsnelson
Effective guitar practicing routines are boring, it takes all the fun out of playing guitar.

The perfect guitar practice routine schedule should contain the proper ratio of:

1. Exercises for hand strength and flexibility

2. General knowledge of and building of skills in fundamentals,

3. Review of fundamentals

4. Learning of new techniques and practice of those new skills so that they become second nature.

5. Building of your song repertoire.

6. Jamming.

7. Performance.



They might be boring, but in order to be a great guitar player discipline must be implemented. I hear a lot of people say this crap, and wonder why they can't progress with their skills. Eventually years later they're still stuck on the same beginner- Intermediate skill set because they never "practice".

OP if you want to get ahead practice just remember that it's quality over quantity. I remember someone made a thread about how they wished they were more disciplined in the past with practicing. It's something that really does pay off especially when you learn how to practice properly you'll go far with your playing..