#2
I had one step down from that and I used it no problem. Now, a pro recorder might say my stuff sounded like crap, but I thought it sounded fine, and the mixer was cheap.
#3
I'm planning on recording guitar, bass and vocals and having drums recorded at a studio. I just want a decent sounding record that I can listen to and be proud of.
#4
Quote by guitar_dude7877
I'm planning on recording guitar, bass and vocals and having drums recorded at a studio. I just want a decent sounding record that I can listen to and be proud of.

Then read the stickies.
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#6
Quote by guitar_dude7877
I did. But why not try something that hasn't been mentioned on there?


Did you actually read the sticky or just read through it?

Because we answer that question.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#8
If we don't mention it then in general the forum doesn't recommend it. While I wrote the thread the choices of interface made on that thread we ones agreed on for the most part. Also remember this a pretty small forum, we don't have many active posters so the chances of any of us using any random bit of kit you could think of is pretty low. Hence the bit about "limited by experience and bias."
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#9
Because it wasn't mentioned on the forum you wrote it shouldn't be asked about or discussed? Also, how would I know without asking if it's been used by someone on the forum?

I'm sure I'm not the only person who reads these forum's and doesn't often post because I would agree with what other people have posted. Many people can frequent these and have experience with products you didn't include on the forum you wrote, and have a view on them. I understand you spent a lot of time putting that information together and respect that but it should be acceptable to discuss other products.
#10
Also remember, it's Behringer.

That company has the worst reputation for quality and reliability of pretty much any company out there. They are cheap for a reason.

You can do better for the money by following the advice in the sticky.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
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My SoundCloud
#11
Behrigner aren't bad, they give people access to products that are usually twice as expensive, sure you can expect to replace any behrionger gear you get within a couple of years as they aren't particularly well built, but they are great for learning principles of some equipment without breaking the bank!

My first condensor microphone was a behringer, it lasted about 3 years before it started crackling like a b*tch, but it taught me a lot about microphone placement and what can be achieved by combining microphone types, it didn't sound great but it deffinetly served its purpose!

I also have behringer guitar effects pedals which have never broken down that I've had over 7 years, a friend of mine has been using his behringer headphone amp for about 4 years now and it's only just starting to go now (minor crackles on 2 of the channels)

I'd say get it as a starter piece of kit if you just want to experiment, but have the mindset that you'll be wanting to replace it in a year or so, if you want to make one purchase now and expect it to last a long time then try something like an Alesis multimix, they're similair to the behringer you're looking at and will last much longer, I got my multimix 6 years ago and it's never broken down, no deteriation in quality, I did get rid of it a few months ago but only because I upgraded to a Focusrite interface with more channels and better preamps.

http://www.gak.co.uk/en/alesis-multimix-8-usb-fx/42590 - I used one similair to this for a while, but they do have 2 and 4 channel models available aswell as a fairly low cost
Last edited by EatShreddies at Aug 10, 2014,
#12
Quote by EatShreddies
Behrigner aren't bad, they give people access to products that are usually twice as expensive, sure you can expect to replace any behrionger gear you get within a couple of years as they aren't particularly well built, but they are great for learning principles of some equipment without breaking the bank!

This is exactly why they aren't recommended. Obviously some of their stuff is better than others, and you may get lucky with reliability, but realistically you can do much better for the money - you don't have to break the bank to buy much higher quality kit.

Behringer gear will also be pretty worthless if it's still working when you sell it. Buy better quality gear used, and you should be able to sell it for a similar amount to your initial investment.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
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Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
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My SoundCloud
#13
I've used one before, it's not what you want at all. Those are line inputs not instrument inputs, and sure they'll fit and be usable, but you'll get a better sound from a guitar link. And as for vocals you'll usually want a condenser microphone (there are notable exceptions, but if you're going to get 1 mic to record as many vocals as well as possible on a budget it'll probably be a condenser). Those microphone require phantom power, which the behringer lacks IIRC.

If you're going to go super-cheap then I would either get a guitar link (for gtr/bass) and blue icicle (for vox), or a Steinberg CI1. That said I really would recommend that you bite the bullet and get your vocals done in the studio too.
If you're going DI chances are 90% of people won't notice the difference in sound between DI sources. It's there, but most people won't know. Vocals however are really affected by the room and the mic selection much like a drum kit is, so I would highly recommend you pick up a guitar link for your guitar/bass parts, and do the rest in the studio.
#14
I had the UB802 mixer. Not the same thing but close.

It lasted me a few years before I grew out of it. I bought another Behringer mixer... just a bigger one - the UB2442-FX-PRO. It too was fine. My band at the time did our album with it.

I have since grown out of that too, and technology has made it so that I don't need a mixer at all. In most cases, particularly interfaces, I'm not sure it even makes sense to buy something that you'll never outgrow. I love my MR816, but when I was just getting into the recording game, dropping almost a grand on something with 8 inputs was overkill to the point of being absurd. So, my little Behringer 802 and my Delta 44 was just the ticket.

I have had other Behringer gear too, (and still have a pair of ECM8000 mics, a pair of headphone amps, and a DI box) and it has all been varying shades of fine.

Can you get better? Of course you can. Can you get better at their price point? The answer used to be "not even close." Now, there is much more competition, so I'd say the answer is, "sometimes."

I've had no significant gripes about their build quality or reliability. My 2442 mixer came with a channel that died in a week. The store took it back, gave me an identical loaner while mine was off getting fixed (I had already registered it, so a replacement wasn't so simple), and when I got my original back fixed, it worked fine for the time I had it.

I stopped using the V-amp due to reliability, but that wasn't as much Behringer's fault as it was the fault of the technology as a whole. We played a gig where there was dodgy power, and every time the power flickered, the v-amp re-booted and my sound went dead for about 10 seconds while it did so. I'll suggest that any modeller would have done the same.

I think it's arrogant to make the claim that "just because we haven't listed it probably means it's not worth listing." Like any of us, or even all of us as a collective, are the gate-keepers of what gear is worth using. Add to the fact that it still somehow seems trendy to crap on the Behringer name and... well...

In short... check reviews for it, but try to find ones done by actual reviewers and not just kids on the net spewing out all the tired rhetoric of "Behringer=crap because everyone says so." Know that if you get it that you will out grow it. Maybe not for a couple years or so, but you will out grow it, IF you stay with this whole recording thing. If you don't, then you've not laid out a ton of money, and you sell it and move on.

It is a point well-taken that the re-sale value of Behringer stuff is lower than the re-sale value of other brands. But when the original price point is lower, then everything is relative. You'll get a lot more for the Soundcraft or the Allen and Heath mixer... but you'll pay a lot more for it.

CT

EDIT: And Chatterbox +1.
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Aug 10, 2014,
#16
Thank you for all the replies. I didn't realize Behringer was so unrespected. My band has a Behringer Eurodesk sx2442fx that we've used for years with no problems. We would run sound for us and other bands. I was already leaning toward an M-Track or something like that I just wanted to see if anyone had tried the Behringer interface.

Thanks.
#17
Quote by EatShreddies
some wise words on here, Behringer just wants to be our friend but the rest of us are too busy fapping to audio porn

Priceless.
#18
It's not so much that people fap to audio porn, more that it's rarely the sensible choice.

Without even considering quality & reliability, you have choices:

1 - Buy Behringer. This will not be your final purchase, it's a safe bet that eventually you will want to upgrade. This means eventually you will want to sell it. With Behringer products, used value is usually between 1/4 & 1/2 the standard retail (based on what I see on eBay UK, no idea how this compares internationally).

2 - Buy a different cheap brand. There are plenty of companies out there making cheap equipment, Zoom make some excellent budget kit that easily competes with rival companies who charge double their prices. Even so, if you buy entry level kit you are likely to upgrade eventually. Again, based on what I see on eBay UK, most other brands will sell used for at least half the standard retail price, often more.

3 - Buy a good brand used. IMO, the most sensible option. You will be getting better quality kit that you are less likely to want to upgrade, and even if you do because you bought it used you will get back most of your initial investment (it's sometimes possible to make a profit, but don't count on it.

To summarise:
1 - Lose most of your money.
2 - Lose some of your money.
3 - Lose hardly any money & risk making profit.

Seems to me the choice is obvious.

I am going to add a disclaimer though: If you find used Behringer kit that is in good working order, it can be a good purchase. Sure, it may not be as high quality as you'll find elsewhere, but it'll be dirt cheap and if it's got through it's first couple of years without breaking, the chances are you've found a good one and it should last you a reasonable amount of time - most things that die due to manufacturing issues do it fairly quickly.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
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My SoundCloud
#19
Quote by GaryBillington

3 - Buy a good brand used. IMO, the most sensible option. You will be getting better quality kit that you are less likely to want to upgrade, and even if you do because you bought it used you will get back most of your initial investment (it's sometimes possible to make a profit, but don't count on


+100

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#20
I have a number of Behringer products and have some stuff that I use every week (mostly PA gear) and it's still going fine years later with no problems. In most cases I have replaced much more expensive gear with new Behringer gear. About eight years ago I replaced a smaller Behringer board with a larger rack mount Mackie and just recently ( a few months ago) replaced the Mackie mixer with a new Behringer board and my band is in love with the Behringer (nice internal effects and more monitor and input options). I keep reading these posts knocking Behringer gear and I just have to say that in my expeience the Behringer gear I have has never broken down or caused me any problems on a job or in my home studio. On top of that it is very cost effective. If money is not a consideration I say go for the higher priced stuff and be happy. If money is a major consideration and Behringer offers a product that fits your needs don't be afarid to try it.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Aug 11, 2014,
#21
The problem here is not so much with Behringer, rather with USB mixers as a whole. They are mixers primarily, and the USB output is a secondary thought. So the decisions made on it's features are intended for live use (as a mixer) rather than for recording.

For example it lacks true instrument inputs (DIs) because when you're playing live, how often are you plugging your instrument directly into the mixer at a live gig? You usually either mic an amp or use a DI box. And condenser mics (the ones that need phantom power) are very sensitive, so their live use is pretty restricted (sometimes as drum overheads, and sometimes to mic jazz/concert/orchestra style bands but that's about it). Because they're not used much in live use, most mixers don't include the phantom power required to run them whereas that's one of the most basic features in a modern interface.

Also although it's not really an issue with a mixer like that, they usually only record two channels regardless of how many mics there are. That's a clear indicator that the intention of the usb output is really to record the output of a live gig, rather than to use it in a studio.
#22
Agreed. My new Behringer mixer has a USB out. Some buyers think this means each channel is accessable by itself through a USB connection. That is not true. The USB gives you a 2 track (stereo) out. I own the board for PA work and don't care about the USB output but I think some people purchase these USB boards with an idea that you can multi track each channel and use this as a 4-8-12 what ever interface with separate channel outputs. No you can't. It's strickly a stereo 2 track output via the USB (which I think is just coming off the two master faders as far as I can tell).

If you are looking for a multi channel interface, don't be confused into thinking an inexpensive mixing board with a USB output will give you 12 separate channels of output via USB. You need a multi channel interface.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Aug 12, 2014,
#23
Yeah they normally are of the master fader, but you can always cheat two mono channels (like any other 'interface') by panning one hard left and one hard right on the board then just tracking channels 1 and 2 as individual mono tracks.